How can I convert NSRange to Range<String.Index> in Swift?

I want to use the following UITextFieldDelegate method:

    func textField(textField: UITextField!,
        shouldChangeCharactersInRange range: NSRange,
        replacementString string: String!) -> Bool {

textField.text.stringByReplacingCharactersInRange(???, withString: string)

enter image description here

  • 53
    Thank you, Apple, for giving us the new Range class, but then not updating of any of the string utility classes, such as NSRegularExpression, to use them! – puzzl Dec 4 '14 at 19:29

12 Answers 12

up vote 243 down vote accepted

The NSString version (as opposed to Swift String) of replacingCharacters(in: NSRange, with: NSString) accepts an NSRange, so one simple solution is to convert String to NSString first. The delegate and replacement method names are slightly different in Swift 3 and 2, so depending on which Swift you're using:

Swift 3.0

func textField(_ textField: UITextField,
               shouldChangeCharactersIn range: NSRange,
               replacementString string: String) -> Bool {

  let nsString = textField.text as NSString?
  let newString = nsString?.replacingCharacters(in: range, with: string)
}

Swift 2.x

func textField(textField: UITextField,
               shouldChangeCharactersInRange range: NSRange,
               replacementString string: String) -> Bool {

    let nsString = textField.text as NSString?
    let newString = nsString?.stringByReplacingCharactersInRange(range, withString: string)
}
  • 10
    This will not work if textField contains multi-code unit unicode characters such as emoji. Since it is an entry field a user may well enter emoji (😂), other page 1 characters of multi code unit characters such as flags (🇪🇸). – zaph Dec 25 '14 at 15:53
  • 2
    @Zaph: since the range comes from the UITextField, which is written in Obj-C against NSString, I suspect that only valid ranges based on the unicode characters in the string would be provided by the delegate callback, and so this is safe to use, but I haven't personally tested it. – Alex Pretzlav Jan 6 '15 at 21:33
  • 2
    @Zaph, that's true, my point is that UITextFieldDelegate's textField:shouldChangeCharactersInRange:replacementString: method won't provide a range which starts or ends inside a unicode character, since the callback is based on a user entering characters from the keyboard, and it's not possible to type only part of an emoji unicode character. Note that if the delegate were written in Obj-C, it would have this same problem. – Alex Pretzlav Jan 7 '15 at 16:28
  • 2
    Not the best answer. Easiest to read code but @martin-r has the correct answer. – Rog Jul 29 '15 at 12:20
  • 3
    Actually you guys should do this (textField.text as NSString?)?.stringByReplacingCharactersInRange(range, withString: string) – Wanbok Choi Mar 16 '16 at 8:04

As of Swift 4 (Xcode 9), the Swift standard library provides methods to convert between Swift string ranges (Range<String.Index>) and NSString ranges (NSRange). Example:

let str = "a👿b🇩🇪c"
let r1 = str.range(of: "🇩🇪")!

// String range to NSRange:
let n1 = NSRange(r1, in: str)
print((str as NSString).substring(with: n1)) // 🇩🇪

// NSRange back to String range:
let r2 = Range(n1, in: str)!
print(str[r2]) // 🇩🇪

Therefore the text replacement in the text field delegate method can now be done as

func textField(_ textField: UITextField,
               shouldChangeCharactersIn range: NSRange,
               replacementString string: String) -> Bool {

    if let oldString = textField.text {
        let newString = oldString.replacingCharacters(in: Range(range, in: oldString)!,
                                                      with: string)
        // ...
    }
    // ...
}

(Older answers for Swift 3 and earlier:)

As of Swift 1.2, String.Index has an initializer

init?(_ utf16Index: UTF16Index, within characters: String)

which can be used to convert NSRange to Range<String.Index> correctly (including all cases of Emojis, Regional Indicators or other extended grapheme clusters) without intermediate conversion to an NSString:

extension String {
    func rangeFromNSRange(nsRange : NSRange) -> Range<String.Index>? {
        let from16 = advance(utf16.startIndex, nsRange.location, utf16.endIndex)
        let to16 = advance(from16, nsRange.length, utf16.endIndex)
        if let from = String.Index(from16, within: self),
            let to = String.Index(to16, within: self) {
                return from ..< to
        }
        return nil
    }
}

This method returns an optional string range because not all NSRanges are valid for a given Swift string.

The UITextFieldDelegate delegate method can then be written as

func textField(textField: UITextField, shouldChangeCharactersInRange range: NSRange, replacementString string: String) -> Bool {

    if let swRange = textField.text.rangeFromNSRange(range) {
        let newString = textField.text.stringByReplacingCharactersInRange(swRange, withString: string)
        // ...
    }
    return true
}

The inverse conversion is

extension String {
    func NSRangeFromRange(range : Range<String.Index>) -> NSRange {
        let utf16view = self.utf16
        let from = String.UTF16View.Index(range.startIndex, within: utf16view) 
        let to = String.UTF16View.Index(range.endIndex, within: utf16view)
        return NSMakeRange(from - utf16view.startIndex, to - from)
    }
}

A simple test:

let str = "a👿b🇩🇪c"
let r1 = str.rangeOfString("🇩🇪")!

// String range to NSRange:
let n1 = str.NSRangeFromRange(r1)
println((str as NSString).substringWithRange(n1)) // 🇩🇪

// NSRange back to String range:
let r2 = str.rangeFromNSRange(n1)!
println(str.substringWithRange(r2)) // 🇩🇪

Update for Swift 2:

The Swift 2 version of rangeFromNSRange() was already given by Serhii Yakovenko in this answer, I am including it here for completeness:

extension String {
    func rangeFromNSRange(nsRange : NSRange) -> Range<String.Index>? {
        let from16 = utf16.startIndex.advancedBy(nsRange.location, limit: utf16.endIndex)
        let to16 = from16.advancedBy(nsRange.length, limit: utf16.endIndex)
        if let from = String.Index(from16, within: self),
            let to = String.Index(to16, within: self) {
                return from ..< to
        }
        return nil
    }
}

The Swift 2 version of NSRangeFromRange() is

extension String {
    func NSRangeFromRange(range : Range<String.Index>) -> NSRange {
        let utf16view = self.utf16
        let from = String.UTF16View.Index(range.startIndex, within: utf16view)
        let to = String.UTF16View.Index(range.endIndex, within: utf16view)
        return NSMakeRange(utf16view.startIndex.distanceTo(from), from.distanceTo(to))
    }
}

Update for Swift 3 (Xcode 8):

extension String {
    func nsRange(from range: Range<String.Index>) -> NSRange {
        let from = range.lowerBound.samePosition(in: utf16)
        let to = range.upperBound.samePosition(in: utf16)
        return NSRange(location: utf16.distance(from: utf16.startIndex, to: from),
                       length: utf16.distance(from: from, to: to))
    }
}

extension String {
    func range(from nsRange: NSRange) -> Range<String.Index>? {
        guard
            let from16 = utf16.index(utf16.startIndex, offsetBy: nsRange.location, limitedBy: utf16.endIndex),
            let to16 = utf16.index(utf16.startIndex, offsetBy: nsRange.location + nsRange.length, limitedBy: utf16.endIndex),
            let from = from16.samePosition(in: self),
            let to = to16.samePosition(in: self)
            else { return nil }
        return from ..< to
    }
}

Example:

let str = "a👿b🇩🇪c"
let r1 = str.range(of: "🇩🇪")!

// String range to NSRange:
let n1 = str.nsRange(from: r1)
print((str as NSString).substring(with: n1)) // 🇩🇪

// NSRange back to String range:
let r2 = str.range(from: n1)!
print(str.substring(with: r2)) // 🇩🇪
  • 7
    That code does not work correctly for characters consisting of more than one UTF-16 code point, e.g. Emojis. – As an example, if the text field contains the text "👿" and you delete that character, then range is (0,2) because NSRange refers to the UTF-16 characters in an NSString. But it counts as one Unicode character in a Swift string. – let end = advance(start, range.length) from the referenced answer does crash in this case with the error message "fatal error: can not increment endIndex". – Martin R Jun 19 '15 at 5:38
  • 8
    @MattDiPasquale: Sure. My intention was to answer the verbatim question "How can I convert NSRange to Range<String.Index> in Swift" in a Unicode-safe way (hoping that someone might find it useful, which is not the case until now :( – Martin R Jun 19 '15 at 14:36
  • 4
    Thank you, once more, for doing Apple's work for them. Without people like you, and Stack Overflow, there's no way I'd be doing iOS/OS X development. Life's too short. – Womble Sep 15 '16 at 0:00
  • 1
    @jiminybob99: Command-click on String to jump to the API reference, read all methods and comments, then try different things until it works :) – Martin R Sep 23 '16 at 13:34
  • 1
    For let from16 = utf16.index(utf16.startIndex, offsetBy: nsRange.location, limitedBy: utf16.endIndex), I think you actually want to limit it by utf16.endIndex - 1. Otherwise, you can start off the end of the string. – Michael Tsai Mar 16 '17 at 15:48

You need to use Range<String.Index> instead of the classic NSRange. The way I do it (maybe there is a better way) is by taking the string's String.Index a moving it with advance.

I don't know what range you are trying to replace, but let's pretend you want to replace the first 2 characters.

var start = textField.text.startIndex // Start at the string's start index
var end = advance(textField.text.startIndex, 2) // Take start index and advance 2 characters forward
var range: Range<String.Index> = Range<String.Index>(start: start,end: end)

textField.text.stringByReplacingCharactersInRange(range, withString: string)

This answer by Martin R seems to be correct because it accounts for Unicode.

However at the time of the post (Swift 1) his code doesn't compile in Swift 2.0 (Xcode 7), because they removed advance() function. Updated version is below:

Swift 2

extension String {
    func rangeFromNSRange(nsRange : NSRange) -> Range<String.Index>? {
        let from16 = utf16.startIndex.advancedBy(nsRange.location, limit: utf16.endIndex)
        let to16 = from16.advancedBy(nsRange.length, limit: utf16.endIndex)
        if let from = String.Index(from16, within: self),
            let to = String.Index(to16, within: self) {
                return from ..< to
        }
        return nil
    }
}

Swift 3

extension String {
    func rangeFromNSRange(nsRange : NSRange) -> Range<String.Index>? {
        if let from16 = utf16.index(utf16.startIndex, offsetBy: nsRange.location, limitedBy: utf16.endIndex),
            let to16 = utf16.index(from16, offsetBy: nsRange.length, limitedBy: utf16.endIndex),
            let from = String.Index(from16, within: self),
            let to = String.Index(to16, within: self) {
                return from ..< to
        }
        return nil
    }
}

Swift 4

extension String {
    func rangeFromNSRange(nsRange : NSRange) -> Range<String.Index>? {
        return Range(nsRange, in: self)
    }
}

This is similar to Emilie's answer however since you asked specifically how to convert the NSRange to Range<String.Index> you would do something like this:

func textField(textField: UITextField, shouldChangeCharactersInRange range: NSRange, replacementString string: String) -> Bool {

     let start = advance(textField.text.startIndex, range.location) 
     let end = advance(start, range.length) 
     let swiftRange = Range<String.Index>(start: start, end: end) 
     ...

}
  • 2
    The characters view and UTF16 view of a string may have different lengths. This function is using UTF16 indexes (that's what NSRange speaks, though its components are integers) against the string's characters view, which may fail when used on a string with "characters" that take more than one UTF16 unit to express. – Nate Cook Nov 2 '15 at 19:44

A riff on the great answer by @Emilie, not a replacement/competing answer.
(Xcode6-Beta5)

var original    = "🇪🇸😂This is a test"
var replacement = "!"

var startIndex = advance(original.startIndex, 1) // Start at the second character
var endIndex   = advance(startIndex, 2) // point ahead two characters
var range      = Range(start:startIndex, end:endIndex)
var final = original.stringByReplacingCharactersInRange(range, withString:replacement)

println("start index: \(startIndex)")
println("end index:   \(endIndex)")
println("range:       \(range)")
println("original:    \(original)")
println("final:       \(final)")

Output:

start index: 4
end index:   7
range:       4..<7
original:    🇪🇸😂This is a test
final:       🇪🇸!his is a test

Notice the indexes account for multiple code units. The flag (REGIONAL INDICATOR SYMBOL LETTERS ES) is 8 bytes and the (FACE WITH TEARS OF JOY) is 4 bytes. (In this particular case it turns out that the number of bytes is the same for UTF-8, UTF-16 and UTF-32 representations.)

Wrapping it in a func:

func replaceString(#string:String, #with:String, #start:Int, #length:Int) ->String {
    var startIndex = advance(original.startIndex, start) // Start at the second character
    var endIndex   = advance(startIndex, length) // point ahead two characters
    var range      = Range(start:startIndex, end:endIndex)
    var final = original.stringByReplacingCharactersInRange(range, withString: replacement)
    return final
}

var newString = replaceString(string:original, with:replacement, start:1, length:2)
println("newString:\(newString)")

Output:

newString: !his is a test
func textField(textField: UITextField, shouldChangeCharactersInRange range: NSRange, replacementString string: String) -> Bool {

       let strString = ((textField.text)! as NSString).stringByReplacingCharactersInRange(range, withString: string)

 }

In Swift 2.0 assuming func textField(textField: UITextField, shouldChangeCharactersInRange range: NSRange, replacementString string: String) -> Bool {:

var oldString = textfield.text!
let newRange = oldString.startIndex.advancedBy(range.location)..<oldString.startIndex.advancedBy(range.location + range.length)
let newString = oldString.stringByReplacingCharactersInRange(newRange, withString: string)

Here's my best effort. But this cannot check or detect wrong input argument.

extension String {
    /// :r: Must correctly select proper UTF-16 code-unit range. Wrong range will produce wrong result.
    public func convertRangeFromNSRange(r:NSRange) -> Range<String.Index> {
        let a   =   (self as NSString).substringToIndex(r.location)
        let b   =   (self as NSString).substringWithRange(r)

        let n1  =   distance(a.startIndex, a.endIndex)
        let n2  =   distance(b.startIndex, b.endIndex)

        let i1  =   advance(startIndex, n1)
        let i2  =   advance(i1, n2)

        return  Range<String.Index>(start: i1, end: i2)
    }
}

let s   =   "🇪🇸😂"
println(s[s.convertRangeFromNSRange(NSRange(location: 4, length: 2))])      //  Proper range. Produces correct result.
println(s[s.convertRangeFromNSRange(NSRange(location: 0, length: 4))])      //  Proper range. Produces correct result.
println(s[s.convertRangeFromNSRange(NSRange(location: 0, length: 2))])      //  Improper range. Produces wrong result.
println(s[s.convertRangeFromNSRange(NSRange(location: 0, length: 1))])      //  Improper range. Produces wrong result.

Result.

😂
🇪🇸
🇪🇸
🇪🇸

Details

NSRange from NSString counts UTF-16 code-units. And Range<String.Index> from Swift String is an opaque relative type which provides only equality and navigation operations. This is intentionally hidden design.

Though the Range<String.Index> seem to be mapped to UTF-16 code-unit offset, that is just an implementation detail, and I couldn't find any mention about any guarantee. That means the implementation details can be changed at any time. Internal representation of Swift String is not pretty defined, and I cannot rely on it.

NSRange values can be directly mapped to String.UTF16View indexes. But there's no method to convert it into String.Index.

Swift String.Index is index to iterate Swift Character which is an Unicode grapheme cluster. Then, you must provide proper NSRange which selects correct grapheme clusters. If you provide wrong range like the above example, it will produce wrong result because proper grapheme cluster range couldn't be figured out.

If there's a guarantee that the String.Index is UTF-16 code-unit offset, then problem becomes simple. But it is unlikely to happen.

Inverse conversion

Anyway the inverse conversion can be done precisely.

extension String {
    /// O(1) if `self` is optimised to use UTF-16.
    /// O(n) otherwise.
    public func convertRangeToNSRange(r:Range<String.Index>) -> NSRange {
        let a   =   substringToIndex(r.startIndex)
        let b   =   substringWithRange(r)

        return  NSRange(location: a.utf16Count, length: b.utf16Count)
    }
}
println(convertRangeToNSRange(s.startIndex..<s.endIndex))
println(convertRangeToNSRange(s.startIndex.successor()..<s.endIndex))

Result.

(0,6)
(4,2)
  • In Swift 2, return NSRange(location: a.utf16Count, length: b.utf16Count) must be changed to return NSRange(location: a.utf16.count, length: b.utf16.count) – Elliot Sep 7 '15 at 5:32

I've found the cleanest swift2 only solution is to create a category on NSRange:

extension NSRange {
    func stringRangeForText(string: String) -> Range<String.Index> {
        let start = string.startIndex.advancedBy(self.location)
        let end = start.advancedBy(self.length)
        return Range<String.Index>(start: start, end: end)
    }
}

And then call it from for text field delegate function:

func textField(textField: UITextField, shouldChangeCharactersInRange range: NSRange, replacementString string: String) -> Bool {
    let range = range.stringRangeForText(textField.text)
    let output = textField.text.stringByReplacingCharactersInRange(range, withString: string)

    // your code goes here....

    return true
}
  • I noticed my code was no longer working after the latest Swift2 update. I've updated my answer to work with Swift2. – Danny Bravo Nov 5 '15 at 16:01

The Swift 3.0 beta official documentation has provided its standard solution for this situation under the title String.UTF16View in section UTF16View Elements Match NSString Characters title

In the accepted answer I find the optionals cumbersome. This works with Swift 3 and seems to have no problem with emojis.

func textField(_ textField: UITextField, 
      shouldChangeCharactersIn range: NSRange, 
      replacementString string: String) -> Bool {

  guard let value = textField.text else {return false} // there may be a reason for returning true in this case but I can't think of it
  // now value is a String, not an optional String

  let valueAfterChange = (value as NSString).replacingCharacters(in: range, with: string)
  // valueAfterChange is a String, not an optional String

  // now do whatever processing is required

  return true  // or false, as required
}

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