19

When i write a function in Go, it should return a value and an error like

func createHashedPassword(password string) string, error {
    //code
}

I want to execute this createHashedPassword in a goroutine and I think to pass data via channel.
But my question is, how can I handle error here or in the goroutine?

33

It's common to bundle multiple outputs into a struct, and return them together over a single channel.

type Result struct {
    Message string
    Error error
}

ch := make(chan Result)
  • Do I pass here a reference type right? I have read somewhere, when it is possible to avoid pass reference type over channel, it is true? – zero_coding Aug 6 '14 at 5:10
  • that's incorrect, and do you mean a pointer? There's no official concept of "reference type', but slices and maps are often called "reference types". You can pass whatever you want through a channel, with the same semantics as any other call or assignment. – JimB Aug 6 '14 at 13:32
  • The Go catchphrase is "Do not communicate by sharing memory; instead, share memory by communicating". Channels give you a way to communicate between threads without needing to protect against accessing the same memory at the same time. So you can share a pointer, but (if I understand right) do so in a way that means you won't have two or more threads accessing that memory at the same time. One thread could receive a pointer, do work on the memory it points to, then stop working on it and pass that pointer on through a channel. Only one thread working on that pointer at any given time. – saward Aug 7 '14 at 0:26
15

You can pass in an error channel as well as a result channel.

errors := make(chan error, 0)
results := make(chan string, 0)

password := "test"

go func() {
    result, err := createHashedPassword(string password)
    if err != nil {
        errors <- err
        return
    }

    results <- result
}()

// do something else

// When you are ready to read from goroutine do this:
select {
    case err := <- errors:
        println(err)
    case res := <- results:
        println(res)
}
7

Here are my two preferred ways:

Two channels, wrapped

This is the "two channels" way, but wrapped into a function to make it look similar to the common pattern:

func createHashedPasswordAsynchronously(password string) (chan string, chan error) {
    resultCh := make(chan string)
    errorCh := make(chan error)

    go func(password string) {
        //code
        if err != nil {
            errorCh <- errors.New("Does not compute")
        } else {
            resultCh <- "8badf00d"
        }
    }(password)

    return resultCh, errorCh
}

And called like this:

resultCh, errorCh := createHashedPasswordAsynchronously("mysecret")
select {
case result := <- resultCh:
  storeHashedPassword(result)
case err := <- errorCh:
  log.Println(err.Error())
}

Anonymous struct

This is the "anonymous struct" way, similar to @saward's answer, but without naming the struct members explicitly:

ch := make(chan struct{string; error})

go func(password string, ch chan struct {string; error}) {
    //code
    if err != nil {
        ch <- struct{string; error}{"", errors.New("Does not compute")}
    } else {
        ch <- struct{string; error}{"8badf00d", nil}
    }
}("mysecret", ch)

r := <-ch
if r.error != nil {
    log.Println(r.error.Error())
} else {
    storeHashedPassword(r.string)
}
4

(since I cannot comment yet...)

I echo what JimB said with:

type Result struct {
    Message string
    Error error
}

ch := make(chan Result)

The trouble with two separate channels, one for the result, and another for the error, is that (as I understand) it won't support concurrent threads out of the box.

You could, for example, have two threads sending data at the same time, where the replies get out of order. That is, you receive the result from thread 1 first, but the error from thread 2 first.

It's easy to create new types like JimB suggested, and should work well with goroutines.

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