16

I have a dynamic query that is just too large to put here. Safe to say that in it's current form it utilizes a CLR procedure to dynamically build joins based upon the number of search parameters passed then takes that result and joins it to more detailed tables to bring back attributes important to the end-user. I have converted the entire query into LINQ to Entities and what I have found is that the SQL that it produces is efficient enough to do the job, however running via EF 6, the query timesout. Taking the resulting SQL and running it in SSMS runs in 3 or less seconds. I can only imagine that my problem is parameter sniffing. I have tried updating statistics on every table in the database and this has not solved the problem.

My Question is:

Can I somehow embed options like an "OPTION RECOMPILE" via EF?

1
  • would love to compare notes with you on these types of dynamic sql projects. Mar 26, 2019 at 15:45

5 Answers 5

19

It's possible to use the interception feature of EF6 to manipulate its internal SQL commands before executing them on DB, for instance adding option(recompile) at the end of the command:

public class OptionRecompileHintDbCommandInterceptor : IDbCommandInterceptor
{
    public void NonQueryExecuting(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<Int32> interceptionContext)
    {
    }

    public void NonQueryExecuted(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<int> interceptionContext)
    {
    }

    public void ReaderExecuted(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<DbDataReader> interceptionContext)
    {
    }

    public void ReaderExecuting(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<DbDataReader> interceptionContext)
    {
        addQueryHint(command);
    }

    public void ScalarExecuted(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<object> interceptionContext)
    {
    }

    public void ScalarExecuting(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<object> interceptionContext)
    {
        addQueryHint(command);
    }

    private static void addQueryHint(IDbCommand command)
    {
        if (command.CommandType != CommandType.Text || !(command is SqlCommand))
            return;

        if (command.CommandText.StartsWith("select", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) && !command.CommandText.Contains("option(recompile)"))
        {
            command.CommandText = command.CommandText + " option(recompile)";
        }
    }
}

To use it, add the following line at the beginning of the application:

DbInterception.Add(new OptionRecompileHintDbCommandInterceptor());
6
  • I added: && !command.CommandText.EndsWith("option(recompile)") since multiple queries could cause the option to be written out already.
    – ewahner
    Aug 5, 2014 at 20:33
  • Query is still timing out. I will have to run a profile on it to see what else could be causing it.
    – ewahner
    Aug 5, 2014 at 20:34
  • Can i ask what the !(command is SqlCommand) bit is preventing?
    – Not loved
    Sep 22, 2014 at 23:42
  • @ Luke McGregor, EF works with SQLite and many other DBs as well.
    – VahidN
    Apr 28, 2015 at 8:58
  • While I'm still exploring the path of Interceptors, I notice a trace flag 4136 will turn off all parameter sniffing server wide. And SQL 2016 has it as a Database level option. sqlservergeeks.com/… mssqltips.com/sqlservertip/4286/…
    – Greg
    Jul 18, 2017 at 13:48
10

I like VahidN's solution, do up vote him, but I want more control of when it happens. It turns out that DB Interceptors are very global, and I only wanted this to happen on specific contexts in specific scenarios.

Here we are setting the ground work to also support adding other query hints, that could be turned on and off as desired.

Since I often expose the method for passing a connection string, I also included support for that.

Below would give your context a flag to enable/disable the hint programatically, by extending the partial class EF generates. We also threw the small piece of reused code in the Interceptor into its own method.

Small Interface

public interface IQueryHintable
{
    bool HintWithRecompile { get; set; }
}

DB Command Interceptor

public class OptionHintDbCommandInterceptor : IDbCommandInterceptor
{
    public void NonQueryExecuting(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<Int32> interceptionContext)
    {
        AddHints(command, interceptionContext);
    }

    public void NonQueryExecuted(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<int> interceptionContext)
    {
    }

    public void ReaderExecuted(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<DbDataReader> interceptionContext)
    {
    }

    public void ReaderExecuting(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<DbDataReader> interceptionContext)
    {
        AddHints(command, interceptionContext);
    }

    public void ScalarExecuted(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<object> interceptionContext)
    {
    }

    public void ScalarExecuting(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<object> interceptionContext)
    {
        AddHints(command, interceptionContext);
    }

    private static void AddHints<T>(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<T> interceptionContext)
    {
        var context = interceptionContext.DbContexts.FirstOrDefault();
        if (context is IQueryHintable)
        {
            var hints = (IQueryHintable)context;

            if (hints.HintWithRecompile)
            {
                addRecompileQueryHint(command);
            }
        }
    }

    private static void addRecompileQueryHint(IDbCommand command)
    {
        if (command.CommandType != CommandType.Text || !(command is SqlCommand))
            return;

        if (command.CommandText.StartsWith("select", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) && !command.CommandText.Contains("option(recompile)"))
        {
            command.CommandText = command.CommandText + " option(recompile)";
        }
    }
}

Extending Entity Context to Add IQueryHintable

public partial class SomeEntities : DbContext, IQueryHintable
{
    public bool HintWithRecompile { get; set; }

    public SomeEntities (string connectionString, bool hintWithRecompile) : base(connectionString)
    {
        HintWithRecompile = hintWithRecompile;
    }

    public SomeEntities (bool hintWithRecompile) : base()
    {
        HintWithRecompile = hintWithRecompile;
    }

    public SomeEntities (string connectionString) : base(connectionString)
    {
    }

}

Register DB Command Interceptor (global.asax)

    DbInterception.Add(new OptionHintDbCommandInterceptor());

Enable context wide

    using(var db = new SomeEntities(hintWithRecompile: true) )
    {
    }

Turn On or Off

    db.HintWithRecompile = true;
    // Do Something
    db.HintWithRecompile = false;

I called this HintWithRecompile, because you might also want to implement a HintOptimizeForUnknown , or other query hints.

7
  • This is slightly better than the accepted solution, but you should disable parameter sniffing using OPTION(OPTIMIZE FOR UNKNOWN) Mar 26, 2019 at 15:50
  • 1
    @JohnZabroski Your miles may vary. Optimize for Unknown will save you from the expense of compiling query plans, but will loose you the ability to detect paradoxes and identities, which could cause a more expensive query plan to run. Therefore, some might call "Optimize For Unknown" also "Optimize for Mediocre". But situations can actually be unique. Perhaps try both. Neither recompiling every query, nor using a potentially un-optimal query plan is ideal. Trade offs. brentozar.com/archive/2013/06/…
    – Greg
    Mar 26, 2019 at 17:16
  • Thanks for the link, but cool buzzwords like "Optimize For Mediocre" don't accurately capture what happens. Especially if all you are doing is a clustered index seek, you probably want to consider Optimize For Unknown. Most EF queries are not complex enough to justify WITH recompile or FREEPROCCACHE. Further, if you read the comments by the SAME author you quote the marketing slogan "Optimize For Mediocre", she states: For these two reasons (and I’m really passionate about #2), I’m much more in favor of using an OPTIMIZE FOR hint on some procedures when [...] parameter sniffing [...]" Mar 26, 2019 at 18:12
  • I could write an article titled "OPTION PREMATURE RECOMPILE" and be just as effective. Mar 26, 2019 at 18:29
  • @JohnZabroski I think you'll see in my example I recommend creating all these query hints. I leave it to others, like yourself, to decide when and where to use each. And specifically because no one may trump all, that is why being able to turn them on and off is so useful.
    – Greg
    Mar 26, 2019 at 19:03
8

Same for me as for @Greg, enabling this system wide was not an option, so I wrote this small utility class that can temporary add option(recompile) to queries executed within an OptionRecompileScope.

Example usage

using (new OptionRecompileScope(dbContext))
{
    return dbContext.YourEntities.Where(<YourExpression>).ToList();
}

Implementation

public class OptionRecompileScope : IDisposable
{
    private readonly OptionRecompileDbCommandInterceptor interceptor;

    public OptionRecompileScope(DbContext context)
    {
        interceptor = new OptionRecompileDbCommandInterceptor(context);
        DbInterception.Add(interceptor);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        DbInterception.Remove(interceptor);
    }

    private class OptionRecompileDbCommandInterceptor : IDbCommandInterceptor
    {
        private readonly DbContext dbContext;

        internal OptionRecompileDbCommandInterceptor(DbContext dbContext)
        {
            this.dbContext = dbContext;
        }

        public void NonQueryExecuting(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<int> interceptionContext)
        {
        }

        public void NonQueryExecuted(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<int> interceptionContext)
        {
        }

        public void ReaderExecuting(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<DbDataReader> interceptionContext)
        {
            if (ShouldIntercept(command, interceptionContext))
            {
                AddOptionRecompile(command);
            }
        }

        public void ReaderExecuted(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<DbDataReader> interceptionContext)
        {
        }

        public void ScalarExecuting(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<object> interceptionContext)
        {
            if (ShouldIntercept(command, interceptionContext))
            {
                AddOptionRecompile(command);
            }
        }

        public void ScalarExecuted(DbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext<object> interceptionContext)
        {
        }

        private static void AddOptionRecompile(IDbCommand command)
        {
            command.CommandText += " option(recompile)";
        }

        private bool ShouldIntercept(IDbCommand command, DbCommandInterceptionContext interceptionContext)
        {
            return 
                command.CommandType == CommandType.Text &&
                command is SqlCommand &&
                interceptionContext.DbContexts.Any(interceptionDbContext => ReferenceEquals(interceptionDbContext, dbContext));
        }
    }
}
2
  • 1
    I like the idea of this solution (creating a scope during which inside anything will get pasted with a query hint.)
    – Greg
    Mar 26, 2019 at 19:07
  • Testing this out now. I will report back if I have any problems. Dec 4, 2019 at 22:44
1

I had a similar problem. In the end, I removed the cached query plan with this command:

dbcc freeproccache([your plan handle here])

In order to get your plan handle, you can use the following query:

SELECT qs.plan_handle, a.attrlist, est.dbid, text
FROM   sys.dm_exec_query_stats qs
CROSS  APPLY sys.dm_exec_sql_text(qs.sql_handle) est
CROSS  APPLY (SELECT epa.attribute + '=' + convert(nvarchar(127), epa.value) + '   '
      FROM   sys.dm_exec_plan_attributes(qs.plan_handle) epa
      WHERE  epa.is_cache_key = 1
      ORDER  BY epa.attribute
      FOR    XML PATH('')) AS a(attrlist)
 WHERE  est.text LIKE '%standardHourRate%' and est.text like '%q__7%'and est.text like '%Unit Overhead%'
 AND  est.text NOT LIKE '%sys.dm_exec_plan_attributes%'

replacing the content of the 'like' clauses with appropriate pieces of your query.

You can see my whole issue at:

SQL Query Using Entity Framework Runs Slower, uses bad query plan

2
  • If parameter sniffing is the cause, then what would prevent another bad query plan from eventually being cached... You can temporarily remove the offender this way, and indeed if it was just caused by bad statistics you might be golden... but OP was particularly talking about parameter sniffing ( where different parameter values might cause a high or low selectivity; which may be atypical of other passed parameter values, or etc.)
    – Greg
    Jul 18, 2017 at 18:53
  • My problem was that the EF query did not take new statistics into consideration, so updating statistics did not affect the cached query. I have a weekly job to update the statistics now, so this particular failure mode should not reoccur. I did have to kill the EF plan in order to generate a plan that used the new statistics. Jan 16, 2018 at 21:07
1

Had a similar case in EF Core 2, but it only differs in the Interceptor implementation. Since this thread helped me the most, i want to share my implementation with you, even if the OP asked for EF 6. Furthemore i improved @Oskar Sjöberg and @Greg Solution a bit, to single out the queries that should be extended with the recompile option.

In EF Core 2 the Interceptor is a little tricky and a bit different.

It can be implemented via Package Microsoft.Extensions.DiagnosticAdapter and the following code

var contextDblistener = this.contextDb.GetService<DiagnosticSource>();
(contextDblistener as DiagnosticListener).SubscribeWithAdapter(new SqlCommandListener());

The Interceptor itself then needs its Methods marked with the corresponding DiagnosticName Annotation.

The tweak i gave to the Interceptor was, that it looks for specific tags (sql comments) inside the command to single out the queries that should be extended with the desired option.

To mark a Query to use the recompile option, you simply have to add a .TagWith(Constants.SQL_TAG_QUERYHINT_RECOMPILE) to the query without bothering around with setting a bool to true and back to false.

This way you also don't have a problem with parallel Queries being intercepted and all being extended with a recompile option because of a single bool HintWithRecompile.

The constant tag strings are designed so that they can only be inside of an sql comment and not part of the query itself. I could't find a solution to analyze only the tag part (implementation detail of EF), so the whole sql command is analyzed and you don't want to add a recompile because some text inside of the query matches your flag.

The "Optimize for Unknown" Part can be improved further by using the command parameter property, but i'll leave that up to you.

public class SqlCommandListener
{
    [DiagnosticName("Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Database.Command.CommandExecuting")]
    public void OnCommandExecuting(DbCommand command, DbCommandMethod executeMethod, Guid commandId, Guid connectionId, bool async, DateTimeOffset startTime)
    {
        AddQueryHintsBasedOnTags(command);
    }

    [DiagnosticName("Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Database.Command.CommandExecuted")]
    public void OnCommandExecuted(object result, bool async)
    {
    }

    [DiagnosticName("Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Database.Command.CommandError")]
    public void OnCommandError(Exception exception, bool async)
    {
    }

    private static void AddQueryHintsBasedOnTags(DbCommand command)
    {
        if (command.CommandType != CommandType.Text || !(command is SqlCommand))
        {
            return;
        }

        if (command.CommandText.Contains(Constants.SQL_TAG_QUERYHINT_RECOMPILE) && !command.CommandText.Contains("OPTION (RECOMPILE)", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
        {
            command.CommandText = command.CommandText + "\nOPTION (RECOMPILE)";
        }
        else if (command.CommandText.Contains(Constants.SQL_TAG_QUERYHINT_OPTIMIZE_UNKNOWN_USER) && !command.CommandText.Contains("OPTION (OPTIMIZE FOR (@__SomeUserParam_0 UNKNOWN))", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
        {
            command.CommandText = command.CommandText + "\nOPTION (OPTIMIZE FOR (@__SomeUserParam_0 UNKNOWN))";
        }
    }
}

Edit: Take care if you subscribe to the DiagnosticSource, since it is not a subscription to the context object. The DiagnosticSource has another lifetime (and can be the source for many contexts). So if you subscribe with every scoped context you create, you will eventually create more and more subscriptions. See my answer here here for a solution to create only a single subscription.

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