2

I have an input which can have a 13 long decimal number with cents and thousands separators. So i can have something like this:

13.213.232.132,13

The same field on my database table is configured to be a NUMBER(13,2) column (oracle)

How can i convert from

13.213.232.132,13 to 13213232132,13

and Vice-Versa?

  • 2
    Convert to a string, remove the periods, then convert back, no? – jhobbie Aug 7 '14 at 18:56
  • 1
    Isn't the input already a string, considering it contains coma and periods ? – Chnossos Aug 7 '14 at 19:08
  • What form does it come back to you in when you read it from the database? Is it a String? – David Conrad Aug 7 '14 at 19:10
  • Do you have NLS_LANG set on the database? If so, what is it set to? – David Conrad Aug 7 '14 at 19:32
  • How are you viewing the value now? Are you reading it as a double from the database, and printing it out in your current locale? – David Conrad Aug 7 '14 at 19:38
2

I'd use NumberFormat.parse() -- get an instance of NumberFormat to match your locale, create a string indicating the format expected, then parse the input with it.

2

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SOLUTION 1

You might want to use DecimalFormat

Here's an example on how to use it.

import java.util.*;
import java.text.*;
class NumberConverter {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        double number = 12312312312.31;
        String pattern = "###.##";
        String pattern2 = "###,###.##";
        DecimalFormat myFormatter = new DecimalFormat(pattern);
        System.out.println(myFormatter.format(number));
        myFormatter = new DecimalFormat(pattern2);
        System.out.println(myFormatter.format(number));
    }
}

All you need to do with this example is replace , for . and viceversa. (I mean separators).

The actual output for my example is:

12312312312.31
12,312,312,312.31

SOLUTION 2

Here's another option on how to achieve it, code taken from @JonSkeet answer. Setting locale, but again assuming your number is a double.

import java.util.*;
import java.text.*;
class NumberConverter {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        double number = 13213232132.13;
        NumberFormat f = NumberFormat.getInstance(Locale.GERMANY);
        ((DecimalFormat) f).applyPattern("##0,000.00");
        System.out.println(f.format(number));
    }
}

SOLUTION 3

If your input is a String then this could be another way of solving (Since it's a 13 length number that's why I use those limits).

import java.util.*;
import java.text.*;
import java.lang.StringBuilder;
class NumberConverter {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        String number = "13.213.232.132,13";
        String number1;
        String number2;

        number1 = number.replace(".", "");

        int length;
        int length1;
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

        sb.append(number1.charAt(0));
        sb.append(number1.charAt(1));
        sb.append(".");

        int counter = 0;
        for(int i = 2; i < 11; i++) {
            if(counter == 3) {
                sb.append(".");
                counter = 0;
            }
            sb.append(number1.charAt(i));
            counter++;
        }
        sb.append(",");
        sb.append(number1.charAt(12));
        sb.append(number1.charAt(13));

        number2 = sb.toString();

        System.out.println(number);
        System.out.println(number1);
        System.out.println(number2);
    }
}

SOLUTION 4

As @kaos said in his comment you can also do it by using DecimalFomatSymbols in this way:

import java.util.*;
import java.text.*;
import java.lang.StringBuilder;
class NumberConverter {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        String formatString = "###,###.##";
        double number = 12312312312.31;
        DecimalFormatSymbols otherSymbols = new DecimalFormatSymbols(Locale.getDefault());
        otherSymbols.setDecimalSeparator(',');
        otherSymbols.setGroupingSeparator('.'); 
        DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat(formatString, otherSymbols);

        System.out.println(df.format(number));
    }
}

Hopefuly any of these examples might help you in whatever you're trying to do.

Good Luck

  • This doesn't answer how to parse the number that has . as a thousands separator and , as a decimal point. It presumes the number is already in a double, which seems a bit unlikely. – David Conrad Aug 7 '14 at 19:11
  • @DavidConrad yeah might not be the exact solution, I'm looking for a "custom" decimal format which allows to do that. OP didn't specify if it was a double or a string. Working on another solution. – Frakcool Aug 7 '14 at 19:24
  • If it was a double, it couldn't have thousands separators in it. – David Conrad Aug 7 '14 at 19:30
  • 1
    Maybe it was an example on how it looks like right now (with a decimal format not specified by OP either) – Frakcool Aug 7 '14 at 19:32
  • You can use DecimalFomatSymbols for changing thousand and decimal characters. – kaos Aug 7 '14 at 19:48
1

Use DecimalFormat:

DecimalFormat formatter = (DecimalFormat) DecimalFormat.getInstance(new Locale("pt", "br"));
    formatter.applyPattern("#0.##"); //i guess this is the pattern you need.

    System.out.println(formatter.format(new BigDecimal("13213232132.13")));
0

A very ugly approach, maybe it helps:

public static void main(final String[] args) {
    final String str = "12.345.678.912,13";
    final String improved = str.replaceAll("\\.", "").replaceAll(",", ".");
    System.out.println(improved);
    final double dbl = Double.parseDouble(improved);
    System.out.println("For database: " + dbl);
    // You may even pass a Locale to String::format
    final String str2 = String.format("%,f", dbl);
    System.out.println(str2);

    final String stringResult = str2.substring(0, str2.length() - 4);
    System.out.println(stringResult);
}

You may find, what you want to have.

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