6

Note: I am NOT asking this question

I looked for information on how to loop over a range of discontiguous numbers such as 0,1,2,4,5,6,7,9,11 without having to put the numbers in by hand and still use the ranges.

The obvious way would be to do this:

for i in 0 1 2 4 5 6 7 9 11; do echo $i; done
  • 1
    My question is: where did these arbitrary sub-ranges come from in the first place? – Barmar Aug 8 '14 at 1:14
  • Barmar -- suppose I want to run something with ssh on multiple machines. When they were initially installed, IT installed them in a one-up fashion. Then a few of them were re-purposed. Now I need to loop over a discontiguous list of numbers. – MrMas Aug 8 '14 at 16:06
  • And you don't have a list of them in a file somewhere, you have to hard-code it into each script that wants to do something with them? – Barmar Aug 8 '14 at 16:17
  • Which means that the next time one of them is repurposed or you add new machines, you'll need to update all the scripts that contain this for loop. Do yourself a favor and make a file. – Barmar Aug 8 '14 at 16:18
  • I just work here. ;-) – MrMas Aug 8 '14 at 18:23
20
for i in {0..2} {4..6} {7..11..2}; do echo $i; done

See the documentation of bash Brace Expansion.

  • Thanks for the search terms. Couldn't think how to look for it. – MrMas Aug 8 '14 at 1:14
2

Edit: oops, didn't realise there were missing numbers.

Updated: Define ranges and then use a while loop for each range. e.g.

ranges="0-2 4-7 9 11"
for range in $ranges
do
    min=${range%-*}
    max=${range#*-}
    i=$min
    while [ $i -le $max ]
    do
        echo $i
        i=$(( $i + 1 ))
    done
done

http://ideone.com/T80tfB

  • This doesn't have the discontinuities I wanted. – MrMas Aug 8 '14 at 1:11
  • Did you miss the word discontiguous in the question? – Barmar Aug 8 '14 at 1:11
  • Yes I did sorry. Fixed it – Sodved Aug 8 '14 at 1:14
  • That's a clever solution, +1 – Barmar Aug 8 '14 at 1:16
2

As others have noted, brace expansion provides a way to select ranges, but you can also assign the results of multiple brace expansions to a variable using echo {..} {..}. This may cut down on the typing in the body of the for loop:

#!/bin/bash

range="`echo {2..6} {31..35} {50..100..10}`"

for i in $range; do echo $i; done

exit 0

output:

2
3
4
5
6
31
32
33
34
35
50
60
70
80
90
100
  • I think the range variable should not have "echo" in it. – MrMas Aug 8 '14 at 15:16
  • 1
    You must, otherwise there is no expansion. – David C. Rankin Aug 8 '14 at 16:00
  • ah -- I understand now. By the time it gets to the for loop, it's just a list of numbers in a string. – MrMas Aug 8 '14 at 16:03
  • I don't see how this cuts down on anything in the body of the loop. However, it's useful if you'll have multiple loops over the same set, since you don't have to repeat the list each time. – Barmar Aug 8 '14 at 16:20
  • I don't know, you count: for i in $range; or for i in $(echo {2..6} {31..35} {50..100..10}); -- which is shorter? – David C. Rankin Aug 8 '14 at 21:29
1
for i in `cat file.txt`; do echo $i; done

where file.txt contains:

0
1
2
4
5
6
7
9
11
  • I didn't say this explicitly in my question, but the point of iterating over something BESIDES a list of numbers would be to save work. up-vote for sheer cheek. – MrMas Aug 8 '14 at 1:12

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