2

I want to get the codepoint for each character in this string "عربى" so I write this code but it always output 63 which is the codepoint of the question mark character "?"

TCHAR   myString[50] = _T("عربى");
int stringLength=_tcslen(_T(myString));

for(int i=0;i<stringLength;i++)
{
   unsigned int number =myString[i];
   cout<<number<<endl;
}

any suggestions ? :)

1

I copied your code, and by removing the _T(myString) cast into simply myString, it worked. Here is the full program.

#include <afxwin.h>

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    using namespace std;

    TCHAR   myString[50] = _T("عربى");
    int stringLength = _tcslen(myString); // <----- edit here

    for(int i=0;i<stringLength;i++)
    {
       unsigned int number =myString[i];
       cout<<number<<endl;
    }
}

Output:

1593
1585
1576
1609
  • This probably doesn't work with code points that consist of more than 2 code units in utf-8. Then again, OP might not need those scripts. – eerorika Aug 8 '14 at 11:33
  • @Nasser : Thank you so much for your help :) user2079303 : Could you plz give an example as I don't understand what you mean and thank you for ur great help :) – Rehab Reda Aug 8 '14 at 11:46
  • @RehabReda: It is my understanding that TCHAR is 16 bits wide (if unicode is enabled). A 32 bit wide code point will be represented by 2 code units in UTF-16. This code still iterates the string by (16 bits wide) code unit rather than code point. For example this character: 𐌂 (isthisthingon.org/unicode/…), the code would print 55296 57090 instead of 66306. (at least I think so, the code doesn't compile in my compiler). I've added an answer that works with all current unicode but requires c++11. – eerorika Aug 8 '14 at 12:05
2

Here's code that uses only the standard library and iterates the string by 32-bit wide code units. In the latest UTF-32 this matches up with code points.

using namespace std;
const auto str = u8"عربى";
wstring_convert<codecvt_utf8<char32_t>, char32_t> cv;
auto str32 = cv.from_bytes(str);
for(auto c : str32)
    cout << uint_least32_t(c) << '\n';

If your standard library hasn't implemented these features yet, you should probably use an external library.

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