14

I have a class depending on an integer template parameter. At one point in my program I want to use one instantiation of this template, depending on a value of this parameter determined at runtime. Here is a simple example demonstrating how I would go about this currently, using a big switch statement:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template<unsigned A>
struct Wrapper {
    typedef typename std::conditional<A==1, int, float>::type DataType;
    DataType content[A];
    void foo() {
        std::cout << A << std::endl;
    };
};    

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::string arg = argv[1];
    int arg_int = std::stoi(arg);

    switch (arg_int) {
    case 1: {
        Wrapper<1> w;
        w.foo();
        break;
    }
    case 2: {
        Wrapper<2> w;
        w.foo();
        break;
    }
    case 3: {
        Wrapper<3> w;
        w.foo();
        break;
    }
    default:
        return 1;
    };

    return 0;
}

This will quickly get unwieldy once I have not only one parameter A, but multiple template arguments in various combinations. Let's also assume that in reality there is a really good reason to implement A as a template parameter.

Is there a way to replace the huge switch statement with almost identical case statements, e.g. using some metaprogramming magic from Boost or a preprocessor hack?

Ideally I would like to be able write something like the following:

INSTANTIATE_DEPENDING(i, {1, 2, 3},
            {
                Wrapper<i> w;
                w.foo();
            }
    );
  • Seems like either a task to solve using virtual inheritance, or, if the integer really just represents the size of an array, then with std::vector. – The Paramagnetic Croissant Aug 8 '14 at 11:22
  • I would create a separate structure for such params to group them and use it as template parameter – Svitlana Lubenska Aug 8 '14 at 11:26
  • The template class is really more complicated than in the simple example. There is no way to avoid having different template instantiations, I have added some extra complexity to the example. – rerx Aug 8 '14 at 11:35
  • What constraints are there on the valid numbers used in the switch? – Niall Aug 8 '14 at 11:41
  • In this case the valid numbers are {1, 2, 3}. It might be different set. I may be able to arrange that they are always ascending natural numbers, though. – rerx Aug 8 '14 at 11:48
16

You could use a variadic template, maybe like this:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <string>

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    if (argc != 2) { return EXIT_FAILURE; }

    handle_cases<1, 3, 4, 9, 11>(std::stoi(argv[1]));
}

Implementation:

template <int ...> struct IntList {};

void handle_cases(int, IntList<>) { /* "default case" */ }

template <int I, int ...N> void handle_cases(int i, IntList<I, N...>)
{
    if (I != i) { return handle_cases(i, IntList<N...>()); }

    Wrapper<I> w;
    w.foo();
}

template <int ...N> void handle_cases(int i)
{
    handle_cases(i, IntList<N...>());
}
  • This is rather beautiful (for C++ standards) and taught me about variadic templates. I can also see how to extend this to multiple parameters by using tuples as template parameters. – rerx Aug 8 '14 at 12:31
  • Ah, unfortunately extending this is not as straight forward as I thought. typedef std::tuple<int, char> ParamTuple; template <ParamTuple ...> struct ParamTupleList {}; does not compile: ‘class std::tuple<int, char>’ is not a valid type for a template constant parameter – rerx Aug 8 '14 at 12:50
  • @rerx: The final function template is just for convenience. You could also say handle_cases(std::stoi(argv[1]), IntList<1, 2, 3>()) directly. That syntax is straight-forward to extend to multiple parameters: f(x, y, z, IntList<1,2,3>(), IntList<3,4>(), IntList<>()) – Kerrek SB Aug 8 '14 at 13:40
  • I see. But all parameter values would need to be of the same (integer) type? – rerx Aug 8 '14 at 13:51
  • It looks cute but if you have a long list, is handle_cases() going to be O(N) on the length of the list as it recurses through it all? In your case if i == 11 – CashCow Aug 8 '14 at 15:50
6

arg_int is a runtime parameter so there is no way to attach it directly to a template parameter. You could use some kind of handler table which would remove the switch statement here.

You'd use something like lookup_handler( int N ) returning a type handler which might be a lambda invoking one of those template functions.

Registering all your lambdas on the table could be done recursively starting with the highest numbered one you allow.

template< unsigned N > register_lambda()
{
     table.add( Wrapper<N>() );
     register_lambda< N-1 >;
}

and specialise for register_lambda<0>

Then somewhere you call register_lambda<32> say and you have registered all the numbers from 0 to 32.

One way to implement such a table is:

class lambda_table
{
 typedef std::function<void()> lambda_type; 
    public:
        void add( lambda_type );
        bool lookup( size_t key, lambda_type & lambda ) const;
};

From main() or wherever you want to invoke it you have a reference to this table (call it table) then call

lambda_type lambda;
if( table.find( arg_int, lambda ) )
        lanbda();
else
      default_handler();

You might change this to give the table itself a default handler where none has been supplied for this number.

Although lambdas can wrap all kinds of data members you might actually want your templates to be classes in a hierarchy rather than lambdas given the data storage within them.

  • hey, register is keyword >o< – ikh Aug 8 '14 at 11:33
  • yeah I replaced it although it's intended as an illustration, to show how it might be done. – CashCow Aug 8 '14 at 11:37
  • Could you write a more complete answer, explicitly showing how to replace the switch? – rerx Aug 8 '14 at 11:38
  • All of that examples are replacing your switch directly. The key is to put it all into a data structure, where your arg_int is the key and retrieves a pointer to a function, that handles your wrapper-foo-thing. – Stefan Weiser Aug 8 '14 at 11:42
3

just use macros!

template<unsigned A>
struct Wrapper {
    int content[A];
    void foo() { };
};

#define WRAPPER_SWITCH_CASE(i) case i: Wrapper<i>().foo(); break;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::string arg = argv[1];
    int arg_int = std::stoi(arg);

    switch (arg_int) {
        WRAPPER_SWITCH_CASE(1)
        WRAPPER_SWITCH_CASE(2)
        WRAPPER_SWITCH_CASE(3)
        default: return 1;
    };

    return 0;
}

(live example)

But as you know, macros are harmful; I think Wrapper should be allocate content at runtime, not template.

  • I'm definitely in favor of using macros (locally, i.e., with an '#undef' afterwards, which should not be too harmful). Now can we extend this solution by some recursive template trick or something else, so that we get rid of the explicit switch? I would like to have something similar to INSTANTIATE_DEPENDING(i, {1, 2, 3}, ... in the question. – rerx Aug 8 '14 at 11:43
  • Macros are not "harmful" but make the code hard to follow and maintain and can in many cases cause subtle errors. – CashCow Aug 8 '14 at 15:51
  • @rerx Yes, in C++11, there's varidic macro, which is derived fron C99's. – ikh Aug 8 '14 at 16:14
  • 1
    @ikh Replace the "1"s with "i"s in the macro definition – Lan Pac Aug 8 '14 at 20:41
2

a short prof of concept application using a recursive generator for the Wrappers:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct FooProvider
{
    virtual void foo() = 0;
};

template<unsigned A>
struct Wrapper : public FooProvider {
    Wrapper() {std::cout << A << std::endl;}
    int content[A];
    virtual void foo() { std::cout << "call:" << A << std::endl;};
};

static std::vector<FooProvider*> providers;

template <unsigned CTR>
struct Instantiator
{
    Instantiator()
    {
        providers.insert(providers.begin(), new Wrapper<CTR>);
        Instantiator<CTR - 1>();
    }
};

template <>
struct Instantiator<0>
{
    Instantiator() {}
};

int main()
{
    Instantiator<100>();
    providers[4]->foo();

    // do not forget to delete the providers
}
  • You all suggest, that all numbers from 0..N are registered? The core of the question is, how to replace a switch. – Stefan Weiser Aug 8 '14 at 11:39
  • I would prefer a solution without any virtual functions. – rerx Aug 8 '14 at 11:45
  • This is just a more elaborate expansion of what I suggested in recursive registration to a table. You could use a lambda instead of polymorphism through virtual. – CashCow Aug 8 '14 at 11:50
  • How exactly does Wrapper<T> use its array data though? If you want these instances to be generated every time you invoke the class it's fine as it is. If you want exactly one of each of these to exist it's a different issue. If you want this data to persist, the approach of having a class from which they all derive may work better – CashCow Aug 8 '14 at 12:09
2

You could just use a higher-order looping macro that passes the block implementation to a generic loop expander:

#define M_NARGS(...) M_NARGS_(__VA_ARGS__, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0)
#define M_NARGS_(_10, _9, _8, _7, _6, _5, _4, _3, _2, _1, N, ...) N

#define M_CONC(A, B) M_CONC_(A, B)
#define M_CONC_(A, B) A##B
#define M_ID(...) __VA_ARGS__

#define M_FOR_EACH(ACTN, ...) M_CONC(M_FOR_EACH_, M_NARGS(__VA_ARGS__)) (ACTN, __VA_ARGS__)

#define M_FOR_EACH_0(ACTN, E) E
#define M_FOR_EACH_1(ACTN, E) ACTN(E)
#define M_FOR_EACH_2(ACTN, E, ...) ACTN(E) M_FOR_EACH_1(ACTN, __VA_ARGS__)
#define M_FOR_EACH_3(ACTN, E, ...) ACTN(E) M_FOR_EACH_2(ACTN, __VA_ARGS__)
#define M_FOR_EACH_4(ACTN, E, ...) ACTN(E) M_FOR_EACH_3(ACTN, __VA_ARGS__)
#define M_FOR_EACH_5(ACTN, E, ...) ACTN(E) M_FOR_EACH_4(ACTN, __VA_ARGS__)
//...etc


#define INSTANTIATE_DEPENDING(L, C) M_FOR_EACH(C, M_ID L)

//...
#define CASE_BLOCK(n) case n: { Wrapper<n> w; w.foo(); break; }

INSTANTIATE_DEPENDING((1, 2, 3), CASE_BLOCK)

#undef CASE_BLOCK  //if you like, not essential to the concept

Not a lot to say about that: the loop repeats the block for the length of the passed list, passing the items in the list to the macro it is to expand. So you put your implementation in that macro (and #undef it if you want it to be local).

More elegantly (letting you nest the parameterized code to expand inside the expression where it belongs, instead of a second definition), you could use the rather high-end Order metaprogramming library:

#include <order/interpreter.h>

ORDER_PP(    // runs Order code
  8for_each_in_range(8fn(8I,
                         8print( (case) 8I (: { )
                                    (Wrapper<) 8I (> w; w.foo(); break; }) )),
                     1, 4)
)

(Use 8for-each instead of 8for_each_in_range for non-contiguous lists. Order's got full functional programming semantics so such things are minor issues.)

  • +1 for introducing me to Order. Since my problem can be solved rather cleanly just using variadic templates, I will go with that approach, though. – rerx Aug 8 '14 at 12:34
1

As an general alternative to switches, you could use a vector or map of function pointers to remove the switch:

template <int i>
int foo()
{
    Wrapper<i> w;
    w.foo();
    return i;
}

static std::vector<int(*)()> m;

void init()
{
    m.push_back(&foo<0>);
    m.push_back(&foo<1>);
}

void bar(int i)
{
    m[i]();
}

In C++11 you could use an initializer list to initialize the vector or map.

  • That would work! Using an initializer list, it would be nice enough. – rerx Aug 8 '14 at 12:01
  • But then I would still have something like std::map<int, void(*)()> cases = { {1, &wrapper_case<1>}, {2, &wrapper_case<2>}, {3, &wrapper_case<3>} }; cases[arg_int](); , which in the end is not less verbose than a switch with macros. – rerx Aug 8 '14 at 12:24
  • These are the informations, that you at least need, because there is a number arg_int and a method you want to connect to that number. Don't forget, that this approach is also much faster than a switch, that will compile into something comparable to if-else. – Stefan Weiser Aug 8 '14 at 12:43
1

Here's another approach:

template<int N>
void do_foo()
{
    Wrapper<N> w;
    w.foo();
}

template<int N, int... Ns>
struct fn_table : fn_table<N - 1, N - 1, Ns...>
{
};

template<int... Ns>
struct fn_table<0, Ns...>
{
    static constexpr void (*fns[])() = {do_foo<Ns>...};
};

template<int... Ns>
constexpr void (*fn_table<0, Ns...>::fns[sizeof...(Ns)])();

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::string arg = argv[1];
    int arg_int = std::stoi(arg);

    // 4 if you have Wrapper<0> to Wrapper<3>.
    fn_table<4>::fns[arg_int]();
}
1

Inspired by Kerrek SB's answer with variadic templates, here is a solution which can easily be extended to multiple parameters of any type:

template <int param1_>
struct Params
{
    const static int kParam1 = param1_;
    // Add other parameters here if needed
};

// Default case: list is empty
template <typename T>
void handle_cases(const T param1) { }

// Regular case: list is not-empty
template <typename T, typename head, typename ...tail>
void handle_cases(const T param1)
{
    if (head::kParam1 == param1)
    {
        Wrapper<head::kParam1> w;
        w.foo();
    }
    else
    {
        handle_cases<T, tail...>(param1);
    }
}

Note that typename T is just an example of an additional template parameter which is not part of the head/tail list.

And here is how to use it:

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    if (argc != 2) { return EXIT_FAILURE; }
    handle_cases<int, Params<1>, Params<3>, Params<4>, Params<9>, Params<11>>(std::stoi(argv[1]));
}

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