2

i am pretty new to perl, and i was trying to set up a web server which runs perl...

i did make it work with another script, but with this one i got this error:

Server error!

The server encountered an internal error and was unable to complete your request.

Error message: End of script output before headers: index.pl

If you think this is a server error, please contact the webmaster.

Error 500

localhost Apache/2.4.9 (Win32) OpenSSL/1.0.1g PHP/5.5.11

This is my script:

#!"C:\xampp\perl\bin\perl.exe"
use strict;
use warnings;

#Open file and define $pcontent as content of body.txt
open(FILE,"body.txt"); 
local $/;
my $pcontent = <FILE>;
close(FILE)

#Open file and define $ptitle as content of title.txt
open(FILE,"title.txt"); 
local $/;
my $ptitle = <FILE>;
close(FILE)

#open html code
print "Content-type: text/html\n\n"; 
print "<html>";

#set html page title
print "<head>";
print "<title>$ptitle</title>";
print "</head>";
print "<body>";

#set the <body> of the html page
if ($pcontent = ""){
 print "
 <H1>ERROR OCCURED!</h1>"
} else{
print $pcontent;
};

#close the html code
print "</body>";
print "</html>";

1 Answer 1

2

The reason it isn't working is because your Perl code has syntax errors which prevent it from compiling. You can check your code for syntax errors by running

perl -c yourscript.pl

And if we do that we find:

syntax error at yourscript.pl line 11, near ")

If we look at line 11, we see that the line before is missing a semicolon at the end of the statement.

close(FILE)     # <--- need semicolon here.

But there are a few other problems with this script:

  • You should avoid the use of global filehandles (FILE) and instead use lexical filehandles. One advantage is that since they are automatically destroyed at the end of their scope (assuming no references) they will be automatically closed for you.
  • You should use the three-argument form of open which will help you catch certain bugs
  • You should check that your open succeeds and report an error if it doesn't
  • You should only localize $/ within a small block, otherwise it will affect other things in your program that you may not want it to
  • If this script grows to be anything other than a trivial example, you should use a templating system rather than printing a bunch of HTML.
  • Your conditional is wrong; you need to use the eq operator for string equality, or == for numerical equality. The = operator is for assignment.

Putting that all together, here is how I would write it:

use strict;
use warnings;

#Open file and define $pcontent as content of body.txt
my $pcontent = do {
    open my $fh, '<', 'body.txt' or die "Can not open body.txt: $!";
    local $/;
    <$fh>;
};

#Open file and define $ptitle as content of title.txt
my $ptitle = do {
    open my $fh, '<', 'title.txt' or die "Can not open title.txt: $!";
    local $/;
    <$fh>;
};

#open html code
print "Content-type: text/html\n\n"; 
print "<html>";

#set html page title
print "<head>";
print "<title>$ptitle</title>";
print "</head>";
print "<body>";

#set the <body> of the html page
if ($pcontent eq ""){
    print "<H1>ERROR OCCURED!</h1>"
} else{
    print $pcontent;
};

#close the html code
print "</body>";
print "</html>";
2
  • All good advice of course. However, what do you think of recommending autodie instead of suggesting that a beginner include manual or die statements? It seems to me that laziness pervades, and so not only does autodie handle the error messages automatically, it also includes a lot more information than the inevitable or die $! that we see so often.
    – Miller
    Aug 8, 2014 at 21:14
  • autodie is also a great choice. I like to make sure people understand what's going on before giving them the shortcut, though. :)
    – friedo
    Aug 8, 2014 at 21:21

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