14

I'm trying to define a protocol that requires an enum with raw value String to be implemented.

I don't believe that it's currently possible to enforce the use of enum, and I'm not sure I really care as long as somewhere down the line I can call fromRaw() and receive a String.

So, I'm trying to maintain the brevity of the following while restricting Beta to be an enum where the raw value is a String:

protocol Alpha {
    typealias Beta: RawRepresentable
}

struct Gamma: Alpha {
    enum Beta: String {
        case Delta = "delta"
    }
}

struct Eta<T: Alpha, U: RawRepresentable where T.Beta == U> {
    let alpha: T
    let beta: U
    init(alpha: T, beta: U) {
        self.alpha = alpha
        self.beta = beta
        println("beta is: \(beta.toRaw())")
    }
}

let gamma = Gamma()
Eta(alpha: gamma, beta: .Delta) // "beta is delta"

The problem with the above is that other raw values are allowed, and therefore this is valid:

struct Epsilon: Alpha {
    enum Beta: Int {
        case Zeta = 6
    }
}

let epsilon = Epsilon()
Eta(alpha: epsilon, beta: .Zeta) // "beta is 6"

To address that I'm currently doing this:

protocol StringRawRepresentable: RawRepresentable {
    class func fromRaw(raw: String) -> Self?
}

protocol Alpha {
    typealias Beta: StringRawRepresentable
}

struct Gamma: Alpha {
    enum Beta: String, StringRawRepresentable {
        case Delta = "delta"
    }
}

// Type 'Epsilon' does not conform to protocol 'Alpha'
struct Epsilon: Alpha {
    enum Beta: Int {
        case Zeta = 6
    }
}

struct Eta<T: Alpha, U: StringRawRepresentable where T.Beta == U> {
    let alpha: T
    let beta: U
    init(alpha: T, beta: U) {
        self.alpha = alpha
        self.beta = beta
        println("beta is: \(beta.toRaw())")
    }
}

let gamma = Gamma()
Eta(alpha: gamma, beta: .Delta) // "beta is delta"

Is there a way that I can declare the typealias differently in the original example to restrict RawRepresentable to String?


Update

Specifying U: RawRepresentable where U.Raw == String seemed hopeful, so I gave that a try:

protocol Alpha {
    typealias Beta: RawRepresentable
}

struct Gamma: Alpha {
    enum Beta: String {
        case Delta = "delta"
    }
}

struct Eta<T: Alpha, U: RawRepresentable where T.Beta == U, U.Raw == String> {
    let alpha: T
    let beta: U
    init(alpha: T, beta: U) {
        self.alpha = alpha
        self.beta = beta

        // Execution was interrupted, reason: EXC_BAD_ACCESS (code=EXC_I386_GPFLT).
        println("beta is: \(beta.toRaw())")
    }
}

let gamma = Gamma()
Eta(alpha: gamma, beta: .Delta) // "beta is delta"

struct Epsilon: Alpha {
    enum Beta: Int {
        case Zeta = 6
    }
}

let epsilon = Epsilon()
Eta(alpha: epsilon, beta: .Zeta) // Error only occurs when this is executed

While this technically prevents using anything other than a String, I'm looking for a compile-time constraint and this appears to be causing a runtime exception.

I'd also prefer that this be enforced by the protocol if possible rather than consumers needing to check that .Raw == String

2
7

Just to add onto this since it's a bit older, your updated example works in swift 2+ now and will complain at compile time that .Zeta is ambiguous unless it's a String type.

You can also put the check in a pattern match for a protocol extension. As an example:

extension SequenceType where Generator.Element:RawRepresentable,
                         Generator.Element.RawValue == String {
    func toStringArray() -> [String] {
        return self.map { $0.rawValue }
    }
}
1
  • As a side-note, I believe this is how Apple handles CodingKey
    – Ash
    Jun 13 '18 at 10:40
2

This should now be possible. For example, the following protocol allows a class to define its own enumeration of 'input' parameters conforming to string:

protocol AttributeContainer {
   associatedtype InputKey: RawRepresentable where InputKey.RawValue: StringProtocol
   func set(value: Any?, for inputKey: InputKey)
}

This could be used as follows:

class MyClass: AttributeContainer {

    enum AttributeKey: String {
       case attributeA, attributeB, attributeC
    }

    func set(value: Any?, for inputKey: InputKey) {
        // Handle the setting of attributes here
    }

}

This is similar to how Apple handles CodingKey in the Codable protocol. I find it useful when doing things like storing arbitrary class types in a database.

0

Let's look at our options here. First, it's (as of Xcode 6 beta 5) a well known restriction that we cannot specify enum type constraints in the easy and expected way. Second, you need something very clear: to be able to call fromRaw(String). And third, you want a compiler error. I'd say your best bet is to write a protocol to do exactly that, and push down to the consumer the requirement to ensure s/he gives you a fromRaw(String). In this case, here's what I would do, simplifying your second code snippet:

protocol Alpha {
    typealias Beta: RawRepresentable
    func fromRaw(raw: String) -> Beta?
}

struct Gamma: Alpha {
    enum Beta: String {
        case Delta = "delta"
        case Omega = "omega"
    }
    func fromRaw(raw: String) -> Beta? {
        return Beta.fromRaw(raw)
    }
}

struct Eta<T: Alpha, U: RawRepresentable where T.Beta == U> {
    let alpha: T
    let beta: U
    init(alpha: T, beta: U) {
        self.alpha = alpha
        self.beta = beta
        println("beta is: \(beta.toRaw())")
    }
}

let gamma = Gamma()
let a = Eta(alpha: gamma, beta: .Delta) // "beta is delta"
println(gamma.fromRaw("delta"))  // Optional(Enum Value)
println(gamma.fromRaw("omega")!) // Enum Value

Philosophically this is imho more aligned with your needs: You say "I want something not only RawRepresentable, but also a fromRaw(String). Figure out how you give it to me". The Gamma struct is the simplest example, where the consumer specifics his enum, and then says "ok, I can give you my standard fromRaw() because it works.

0

A colleague and I talked this out and in Swift 2.0/2.1, you can do this with a protocol: https://gist.github.com/designatednerd/5645d286df0ce939714b

Tried it out in an app I'm working with, works like a charm. :)

1
  • This isn't as useful because while the enums aren't RawRepresentable, you can't do Wat(rawValue: "Steve")
    – Chilv
    Nov 1 '17 at 12:03

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.