196

Question

Apple's docs specify that:

willSet and didSet observers are not called when a property is first initialized. They are only called when the property’s value is set outside of an initialization context.

Is it possible to force these to be called during initialization?

Why?

Let's say I have this class

class SomeClass {
    var someProperty: AnyObject {
        didSet {
            doStuff()
        }
    }

    init(someProperty: AnyObject) {
        self.someProperty = someProperty
        doStuff()
    }

    func doStuff() {
        // do stuff now that someProperty is set
    }
}

I created the method doStuff, to make the processing calls more concise, but I'd rather just process the property within the didSet function. Is there a way to force this to call during initialization?

Update

I decided to just remove the convenience intializer for my class and force you to set the property after initialization. This allows me to know didSet will always be called. I haven't decided if this is better overall, but it suits my situation well.

  • it is honestly best just to "accept this is how swift works". if you put an inline initialization value on the var statement, of course that does not call "didSet". that's why the "init()" situation must also not call "didSet". it all makes sense. – Fattie Oct 29 '17 at 16:41
  • @Logan The question itself answered my question ;) thanks! – AamirR Jun 28 '18 at 10:15
  • 1
    If you want to use the convenience initializer, you can combine it with defer: convenience init(someProperty: AnyObject) { self.init() defer { self.someProperty = someProperty } – Darek Cieśla Oct 25 '18 at 6:11
97

Create an own set-Method and use it within your init-Method:

class SomeClass {
    var someProperty: AnyObject! {
        didSet {
            //do some Stuff
        }
    }

    init(someProperty: AnyObject) {
        setSomeProperty(someProperty)
    }

    func setSomeProperty(newValue:AnyObject) {
        self.someProperty = newValue
    }
}
  • 2
    Why would this differ from self.someProperty = newValue in the init? Have you got a working test case? – user151019 Aug 10 '14 at 17:12
  • 2
    Don't know why it works -- but it does. Directly setting the new value within the init()-Method doesn't call didSet() -- but using the given Method setSomeProperty() does. – Oliver Aug 10 '14 at 17:17
  • 47
    I think I know what's happening here. By declaring someProperty as type: AnyObject! (an implicitly unwrapped optional), you allow self to fully initialize without someProperty being set. When you call setSomeProperty(someProperty) you're calling an equivalent of self.setSomeProperty(someProperty). Normally you wouldn't be able to do this because self hasn't been fully initialized. Since someProperty doesn't require initialization and you are calling a method dependent on self, Swift leaves the initialization context and didSet will run. – Logan Aug 10 '14 at 17:47
  • 3
    It looks like anything that is set outside of the actual init() DOES get didSet called. Literally anything that is not set init() { *HERE* } will have didSet called. Great for this question but using a secondary function to set some values leads to didSet being called. Not great if you want to reuse that setter function. – WCByrne Mar 14 '15 at 2:39
  • 4
    @Mark seriously, trying to apply common sense or logic to Swift is just absurd. But you can trust the upvotes or try it yourself. I just did and it works. And yes, it makes no sense at all. – Dan Rosenstark Apr 8 '16 at 1:34
273

If you use defer inside of an initializer, for updating any optional properties or further updating non-optional properties that you've already initialized and after you've called any super.init() methods, then your willSet, didSet, etc. will be called. I find this to be more convenient than implementing separate methods that you have to keep track of calling in the right places.

For example:

public class MyNewType: NSObject {

    public var myRequiredField:Int

    public var myOptionalField:Float? {
        willSet {
            if let newValue = newValue {
                print("I'm going to change to \(newValue)")
            }
        }
        didSet {
            if let myOptionalField = self.myOptionalField {
                print("Now I'm \(myOptionalField)")
            }
        }
    }

    override public init() {
        self.myRequiredField = 1

        super.init()

        // Non-defered
        self.myOptionalField = 6.28

        // Defered
        defer {
            self.myOptionalField = 3.14
        }
    }
}

Will yield:

I'm going to change to 3.14
Now I'm 3.14
  • 4
    Cheeky little trick, I like it... weird quirk of Swift though. – Chris Hatton Nov 15 '16 at 2:01
  • 4
    Great. You found another useful case of using defer. Thanks. – Ryan Nov 22 '16 at 17:09
  • 1
    Great use of defer! Wish I could give you more than one upvote. – Christian Schnorr Jun 14 '17 at 18:48
  • 3
    very interesting.. I've never seen defer used like this before. It's eloquent and works. – aBikis Jun 27 '17 at 18:49
  • 1
    wonderful, init with defer can trigger didSet – cuimingda May 17 '18 at 5:04
74

As a variation of Oliver's answer, you could wrap the lines in a closure. Eg:

class Classy {

    var foo: Int! { didSet { doStuff() } }

    init( foo: Int ) {
        // closure invokes didSet
        ({ self.foo = foo })()
    }

}

Edit: Brian Westphal's answer is nicer imho. The nice thing about his is that it hints at the intent.

  • 2
    That's clever and does not pollute the class with redundant methods. – pointum Sep 3 '15 at 22:59
  • Very nice indeed =) – CodeMonkey Dec 17 '15 at 15:34
  • 2
    Clever answer! One note: if your class is a subclass of something else, you will need to call super.init() before ({ self.foo = foo })() – kcstricks Apr 6 '16 at 20:47
  • 1
    @Hlung, I don't get a feeling it's more likely to break in future than anything else, but there is still the problem that without commenting the code it's not very clear what it does. At least Brian's "defer" answer gives the reader a hint that we want to perform the code after initialization. – Charlesism Apr 28 '16 at 21:05
  • 1
    Very classy answer, thanks! – meaning-matters Jul 31 '17 at 14:32
10

I had the same problem and this works for me

class SomeClass {
    var someProperty: AnyObject {
        didSet {
            doStuff()
        }
    }

    init(someProperty: AnyObject) {
        defer { self.someProperty = someProperty }
    }

    func doStuff() {
        // do stuff now that someProperty is set
    }
}
  • where did you get it? – Vanya Oct 28 '17 at 2:26
  • 2
    This approach no longer works. The compiler throws two errors: – 'self' used in method call '$defer' before all stored properties are initialized – Return from initializer without initializing all stored properties – Edward B May 10 '18 at 18:35
  • You're right but there's a workaround. You only need to declare someProperty as implicit unwrapped or optional and supply it will a default value with nil coalescing to avoid failures. tldr; someProperty must be an optional type – Mark Apr 10 at 3:18
2

This works if you do this in a subclass

class Base {

  var someProperty: AnyObject {
    didSet {
      doStuff()
    }
  }

  required init() {
    someProperty = "hello"
  }

  func doStuff() {
    print(someProperty)
  }
}

class SomeClass: Base {

  required init() {
    super.init()

    someProperty = "hello"
  }
}

let a = Base()
let b = SomeClass()

In a example, didSet is not triggered. But in b example, didSet is triggered, because it is in the subclass. It has to do something with what initialization context really means, in this case the superclass did care about that

1

While this isn't a solution, an alternative way of going about it would be using a class constructor:

class SomeClass {
    var someProperty: AnyObject {
        didSet {
            // do stuff
        }
    }

    class func createInstance(someProperty: AnyObject) -> SomeClass {
        let instance = SomeClass() 
        instance.someProperty = someProperty
        return instance
    }  
}
  • 1
    This solution would require you to change the optionality of someProperty since it won't have given it a value during initialization. – Mick MacCallum Jan 31 '18 at 14:30
1

In the particular case where you want to invoke willSet or didSet inside init for a property available in your superclass, you can simply assign your super property directly:

override init(frame: CGRect) {
    super.init(frame: frame)
    // this will call `willSet` and `didSet`
    someProperty = super.someProperty
}

Note that Charlesism solution with a closure would always work too in that case. So my solution is just an alternative.

-1

You can solve it in obj-с way:

class SomeClass {
    private var _someProperty: AnyObject!
    var someProperty: AnyObject{
        get{
            return _someProperty
        }
        set{
            _someProperty = newValue
            doStuff()
        }
    }
    init(someProperty: AnyObject) {
        self.someProperty = someProperty
        doStuff()
    }

    func doStuff() {
        // do stuff now that someProperty is set
    }
}
  • 1
    Hi @yshilov, I don't think this really solves the problem I was hoping to since technically, when you call self.someProperty you're leaving initialization scope. I believe the same thing could be accomplished by doing var someProperty: AnyObject! = nil { didSet { ... } }. Still, some might appreciate it as a work around, thanks for the addition – Logan Sep 2 '15 at 18:16
  • @Logan nope, that will not work. didSet will be completely ignored in init(). – yshilov Sep 2 '15 at 19:11
  • Ok, you are correct, just tested! :) – Logan Sep 2 '15 at 19:16

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.