I have a .bat file which executes the SQL file as follows.

The aim is that if records are found in a table, nothing will be done, whereas if the table is empty, some records will be inserted.

BEGIN 
  DECLARE rowCount INT; 
  SELECT count(*) FROM `martin1` INTO rowCount;
  IF rowCount <= 5 THEN

  END IF;
END;

But when I execute it, there is an error. I tried to delete the DECLARE, but even for (IF SELECT COUNT(*)...>0) there is still an error.

The error is,

ERROR 1064 (42000) at line 1: You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'DECLARE rowCount INT' at line 2

How can I resolve this?

  • What is the error? – hjpotter92 Aug 11 '14 at 14:59
  • 1
    You can use this if construct only in stored programs. The same goes for SELECT ... INTO variable. Have a look at MySQL Compound-Statement Syntax – VMai Aug 11 '14 at 15:02
  • What @VMai said is absolutely correct. You may want to post what you are actually trying to do? there may be an alternative. – Rahul Aug 11 '14 at 15:07
  • error is "ERROR 1064 (42000) at line 1: You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the ma nual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use n ear 'DECLARE rowCount INT' at line 2" – martinwang1985 Aug 11 '14 at 15:14
  • so is it impossible for a bat file to check select count(*)? thank u – martinwang1985 Aug 11 '14 at 15:15
up vote -1 down vote accepted

try this way

BEGIN 
  DECLARE rowCount INT; 
  SELECT count(*) INTO rowCount FROM `martin1`
  IF rowCount <= 5 THEN

  END IF;
END;

And have a look at this

  • thank u very much for ur kindness reply.but i was told an error with this code "ERROR 1064 (42000) at line 1: You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the ma nual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use n ear 'DECLARE rowCount INT' at line 2" – martinwang1985 Aug 11 '14 at 15:13
  • This is not a correct answer in any sense. – Rahul Aug 11 '14 at 15:16

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