2

I have a C# app with all our resources in a single library. This is basically several folders, each having one or more .resx files in it.

For the most part, the .resx files have string resources. A few have file resources.

I have a task to go through these string resources and do something with them. Just the string ones though, not the files.

Currently, I can load the resources from a separate dll:

var asm = System.Reflection.Assembly.LoadFrom("External.Resources.dll");

string[] strings = asm.GetManifestResourceNames();

foreach (var s in strings)
{
    var rm = new ResourceManager(s, asm);

    var rs = rm.GetResourceSet(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, true, true);

    foreach (DictionaryEntry de in rs)
    {
        var val = de.Value.ToString();
        var key = de.Key.ToString();
    }
}

Unfortunately there's no way for me to tell what the resource is. If it's a file, the Value will just contain the text of that file.

How can I check if the value is a string or a file (text) coming from the resource file?

3

If you want to get the original Type of resource, then you will have to access the original resource object. It will have static properties of the specific types; e.g. files will be byte[], strings as string etc.

var asm = System.Reflection.Assembly.LoadFrom("External.Resources.dll");
string[] strings = asm.GetManifestResourceNames();

foreach (var s in strings)
{
    var rm = new ResourceManager(s, asm);

    // Get the fully qualified resource type name
    // Resources are suffixed with .resource
    var rst = s.Substring(0, s.IndexOf(".resource"));
    var type = asm.GetType(rst, false);

    // if type is null then its not .resx resource
    if (null != type)
    {
        var resources = type.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic);
        foreach (var res in resources)
        {
            // collect string type resources
            if (res.PropertyType == typeof(string))
            {
                // get value from static property
                string myResourceString = res.GetValue(null, null) as string;
            }
        }
    }

}  
  • Should files always be byte[]? I used your code and ran it against my resource library and it's still pulling the contents of the text file, so the res PropertyType is still String, and GetValue returns a string (the contents of the file). You can simulate by creating another dll project, adding a resource file, adding a text file and adding it as a file resource to the resx file. – Mike Aug 11 '14 at 17:54
  • 1
    Text files are automatically converted to strings. That's the default behavior, as they may be required for culture based output/conversion. Only way you can differentiate if it is truly a file or not, is by reading the original .resx xml file (which is not directly available within the assembly). Otherwise, it will be problematic for you to assume if string was from a file or from resource text. – loopedcode Aug 11 '14 at 20:47
1

A LINQ version of "loopedcode" code should be the following:

 var asm = System.Reflection.Assembly.LoadFrom("External.Resources.dll");
 string[] strings = asm.GetManifestResourceNames();
 string myResourceString=null;
  foreach (var res in from s in strings
                                select s.Substring(0, s.IndexOf(".resource"))
                                into rst
                                select asm.GetType(rst, false)
                                into type
                                where null != type
                                select type.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic)
                                into resources
                                from res in resources
                                where res.PropertyType == typeof(string)
                                select res)
        {
            myResourceString = res.GetValue(null, null) as string;
        }

Please vote "loopedcode" answer, not mine. My code has been created using Resharper starting from his original code, I just did some changes and removed a not useful instruction:

var rm = new ResourceManager(s, asm);
0

The most direct way, given your code, is to call ResourceSet.GetString(de.Key) and catch an InvalidOperationException for the non-string resources. Not terribly efficient, but I assume you are building up a cache here, so it's a one-time cost.

  • I've got a couple different ways of accessing, but the core of the issue is what you addressed. If (for example)I have a .sql file linked to in my resource file, by time I'm calling on the Value, it's a string. So in this case, ResourceSet.GetString(de.Value) would return the contents of the SQL file. – Mike Aug 11 '14 at 16:10
  • Actually, that should be de.Key. – Clever Neologism Aug 11 '14 at 16:13
  • I know. What I'm saying is the result will be a string, regardless of whether it's a string resource or a file with text in it. It's not throwing any exception, just returning the contents of the file. – Mike Aug 11 '14 at 16:37
  • I did not realize you meant text files (as opposed to images other other non-ascii files). – Clever Neologism Aug 11 '14 at 17:21
  • No worries, thank you for taking the time to help me. – Mike Aug 11 '14 at 17:54

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