7

A lot of Java resource usage examples look like this:

Resource r = openResource(); 
try { 
  // use resource
} finally { 
  r.close();
}

The declaration of r has to be outside of the try-clause to be visible in the finally-clause, but this also makes it look like there's a potential race condition: what if there's a thread interruption right between the openResource()-call and entering the try-clause?

Could that mean that the resource doesn't actually get closed in that scenario?

Or does Java guarantee that the try-finally covers r "fully", despite the syntax looking like it wouldn't?

Or do I have to write:

Resource r = null;  
try { 
  r = openResource();
  // use resource
} finally { 
  if (r != null) r.close();
}

in order to protect against thread interruptions?

  • 1
    In theory, yes, there is a problem. In practice, however, so long as there are no intervening statements I doubt that there's a scenario where you could get an interrupt after returning from openResource and before entering the try region. The real exposure would be inside openResource, which would be before r would be set and hence out of the control of the caller anyway. – Hot Licks Aug 11 '14 at 20:17
4

what if there's a thread interruption right between the openResource()-call and entering the try-clause?

Then the thread won't throw an InterruptedException until it hits some blocking call. That can't happen before it gets into the try block, because there aren't any more blocking calls, assuming the method actually returns. From the docs for InterruptedException:

Thrown when a thread is waiting, sleeping, or otherwise occupied, and the thread is interrupted, either before or during the activity. Occasionally a method may wish to test whether the current thread has been interrupted, and if so, to immediately throw this exception.

Note that even if you do put the acquisition inside the try block, that doesn't really prevent any race condition that would otherwise exist - because you'd be relying on the method or constructor returning in the first place. If an exception can happen after the method/constructor returns, why can't it happen just before it returns, but after the resource has been acquired? If that happens, there's nothing you can call close on...

I'd still recommend using the try-with-resources statement in Java 7, but if you look at the JLS section 14.20.3.1 you'll see that the expansion is like your first piece of code:

The meaning of a basic try-with-resources statement:

try ({VariableModifier} R Identifier = Expression ...)
    Block

is given by the following translation to a local variable declaration and a try-catch-finally statement:

{
    final {VariableModifierNoFinal} R Identifier = Expression;
    Throwable #primaryExc = null;

    try ResourceSpecification_tail
        Block
    catch (Throwable #t) {
        ...
        #primaryExc = #t;
        throw #t;
    } finally {
       ...
    }
}
  • The term "race condition" is being misapplied here. – Hot Licks Aug 11 '14 at 20:24
  • @HotLicks: Actually, I'm not sure it is. If it's one thread calling interrupt() on the thread which is handling the resource, the OP believes there's a race between the thread getting interrupted, and it "reaching" the try block. – Jon Skeet Aug 11 '14 at 20:26
  • Ah, you mean: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/… and docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/… - the exception is only raised when sleeping / waiting, not at arbitrary points. – Jxtps Aug 11 '14 at 20:26
  • @Jxtps: That's it, thanks. Will edit it in. – Jon Skeet Aug 11 '14 at 20:28
  • 1
    The point is that we're only concerned about exceptions, and exceptions are entirely synchronous. Yes, the cause of an exception can be some asynchronous event, but that does not in any way affect how you have to handle the exception. And, in theory, an InternalError or some such can occur at any point in any Java program, as a result of internal malfunction or the like. – Hot Licks Aug 11 '14 at 20:34
4

Those Java resource usage examples could be written like the example you give where r is initially set to null, but if they used the Java 7 try-with-resources syntax (Assuming Resource implements AutoCloseable):

try (Resource r = openResource()) {
    // use resource
}

Then they would be equivalent to the first example, where openResource() is called prior to the try block. The Java Language Specification for the try-with-resources statement defines the semantics as equivalent to assigning the variable with the initializer before the block, and then entering the try-catch-finally block.

There appears to be a problem with an exception occurring before the try block is entered. The problem is largely theoretical, though. If openResource() returns normally and there are no intervening statements between the assignment to r and the beginning of the try block, then it is unlikely, though not impossible, that some other thread would get control before the try block began, but even then, when your thread started running again it would enter the try block without incident. If the other thread did something that caused the JVM to shut down, such as calling System.exit, then you typically would not need to worry about closing resources. And even this case is highly unlikely.

If, on the other hand, there was a problem opening the resource, presumably openResource() would throw, which would prevent r from ever being assigned.

  • I don't believe that's the case - see my answer. Obviously try-with-resources is simpler anyway... – Jon Skeet Aug 11 '14 at 20:19
  • 1
    Also, note that the try-with-resources block acquires the resource outside the try/finally too - see docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se8/html/… – Jon Skeet Aug 11 '14 at 20:20
  • I believe that Jon is correct, in this scenario. But using the try-with-resource style is probably more "structured" and avoids several coding pitfalls. – Hot Licks Aug 11 '14 at 20:21
  • @HotLicks: Oh absolutely - I'd always recommend using it. Just not for this reason. – Jon Skeet Aug 11 '14 at 20:23
  • I've updated to take into account the points made by Hot Licks and QuercusMax. I'll update again to include Jon's link. I wasn't aware of that! – David Conrad Aug 11 '14 at 20:25
3

There's no potential race condition. You'd either get an exception during the call to getResource, or it might return null - but there's no race condition. If your thread was interrupted, you may get an InterruptedException, but that would prevent you from entering the try block.

  • And it should be noted that "race condition" should be reserved for two (or more) threads "simultaneously" accessing/updating the same resource. In this scenario any exception will be synchronous to the current thread, even if somehow provoked by another thread. – Hot Licks Aug 11 '14 at 20:23
0

Read this article about try-with-resources http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/exceptions/tryResourceClose.html

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