43

To get a local beginning of today time object I extract YMD and reconstruct the new date. That looks like a kludge. Do I miss some other standard library function?

code also runnable at http://play.golang.org/p/OSRl0nxyB7 :

func Bod(t time.Time) time.Time {
    year, month, day := t.Date()
    return time.Date(year, month, day, 0, 0, 0, 0, t.Location())
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(Bod(time.Now()))
}
4
  • 3
    LGTM. That is the correct way to do it. Commented Aug 12, 2014 at 0:35
  • @Stephen Weinberg, feels like a date boundary may be available as an interim result of the Date() function, I wondered if some other function shortcuts re-assembly. OK then... Commented Aug 12, 2014 at 0:38
  • @VladDidenko: The answer that you accepted doesn't do what you asked. See my answer for details.
    – peterSO
    Commented Aug 12, 2014 at 2:33
  • 1
    Note, this doesn't run properly on the Go Playground, as their clock is set to November 2009. Commented Aug 23, 2019 at 15:52

3 Answers 3

75

Both the title and the text of the question asked for "a local [Chicago] beginning of today time." The Bod function in the question did that correctly. The accepted Truncate function claims to be a better solution, but it returns a different result; it doesn't return a local [Chicago] beginning of today time. For example,

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

func Bod(t time.Time) time.Time {
    year, month, day := t.Date()
    return time.Date(year, month, day, 0, 0, 0, 0, t.Location())
}

func Truncate(t time.Time) time.Time {
    return t.Truncate(24 * time.Hour)
}

func main() {
    chicago, err := time.LoadLocation("America/Chicago")
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }
    now := time.Now().In(chicago)
    fmt.Println(Bod(now))
    fmt.Println(Truncate(now))
}

Output:

2014-08-11 00:00:00 -0400 EDT
2014-08-11 20:00:00 -0400 EDT

The time.Truncate method truncates UTC time.

The accepted Truncate function also assumes that there are 24 hours in a day. Chicago has 23, 24, or 25 hours in a day.

4
  • I went through quite a few examples and not seem to be able to see the 23,24,25 hours problem manifest itself. As it calculates in UTC, which does not have daylight savings, it seems to mitigate the issue. I posted some examples around the beginning of CDT on March 9, 2014 at 2AM here: play.golang.org/p/5_wzfsrn-d Commented Aug 12, 2014 at 5:49
  • Thanks Peter, I was fooled by testing quickly a location-specific time in the playground. However about the hours in a day (assuming you're talking about the leap second?), the time.Time value won't represent 25 hours in a day, it will roll over to the next day, so in this regard, the 24*time.Hour truncation should be ok.
    – mna
    Commented Aug 12, 2014 at 12:30
  • A code example which produces the example output and runs at the Golang Playground is posted at play.golang.org/p/fYhsXQeevO . Commented Aug 16, 2014 at 18:12
  • I also edited this answer to reflect it is accepted - but the edit got somehow stuck in reviews. Peter, if you have a chance to look at it and accept/reject it? Commented Aug 16, 2014 at 18:13
9

EDIT: This only works for UTC times (it was tested in the playground, so the location-specific test was probably wrong). See PeterSO's answer for issues of this solution in location-specific scenarios.

You can use the Truncate method on the date, with 24 * time.Hour as duration:

http://play.golang.org/p/zJ8s9-6Pck

func main() {
    // Test with a location works fine too
    loc, _ := time.LoadLocation("Europe/Berlin")
    t1, _ := time.ParseInLocation("2006 Jan 02 15:04:05 (MST)", "2012 Dec 07 03:15:30 (CEST)", loc)
    t2, _ := time.Parse("2006 Jan 02 15:04:05", "2012 Dec 07 00:00:00")
    t3, _ := time.Parse("2006 Jan 02 15:04:05", "2012 Dec 07 23:15:30")
    t4, _ := time.Parse("2006 Jan 02 15:04:05", "2012 Dec 07 23:59:59")
    t5, _ := time.Parse("2006 Jan 02 15:04:05", "2012 Dec 08 00:00:01")
    times := []time.Time{t1, t2, t3, t4, t5}

    for _, d := range times {
        fmt.Printf("%s\n", d.Truncate(24*time.Hour))
    }
}

To add some explanation, it works because truncate "rounds down to a multiple of" the specified duration since the zero time, and the zero time is January 1, year 1, 00:00:00. So truncating to the nearest 24-hour boundary always returns a "beginning of day".

5
  • Thats a neat little trick. Definitely putting this in my snippet library! :) Commented Aug 12, 2014 at 1:24
  • @PuerkitoBio, thank you, that is the kind of thing I was looking for :) Commented Aug 12, 2014 at 1:45
  • I have un-marked this as an answer only to avoid people using it until the Truncate behaviour clarified. The behaviour mentioned by @peterSO looks wrong to me. I have replicated it and will file an issue - either it needs more documentation, or it is a straight out bug. Commented Aug 12, 2014 at 3:05
  • After looking more at it, it does seem that the documentation is complete. It states in the Truncate() doc, that the calculation is performed "since the zero time", and in the Time type docs that "The zero value of type Time is January 1, year 1, 00:00:00.000000000 UTC." The result seems unintuitive at first, but works as documented: Thank you for showing this function, I was unaware of it, but the answer as is does not seem to apply. Applying truncate is interesting and worth examples and awareness in by itself. Some examples: play.golang.org/p/5_wzfsrn-d Commented Aug 12, 2014 at 5:41
  • Interesting, I wasn't sure if it worked only for UTC times, which is why I added a location-specific test, but I didn't test further. That's good to know, you should accept PeterSO's answer.
    – mna
    Commented Aug 12, 2014 at 12:05
2

I needed the implementation to be a bit faster. Here's an example usage cutting down on calls to time.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"

    "github.com/tentorium-trading/api/conf"
)

var (
    NewYorkLocation, _ = time.LoadLocation("America/New_York")
)

func main() {
    fmt.Println(GetStartOfDayNY(1664337601))

    // fmt.Println(GetStartOfDayNY(time.Now().Unix()))
}

func GetStartOfDayNY(unixTS int64) int64 {
    tm := time.Unix(unixTS, 0).In(conf.NewYorkLocation)
    hour, minute, second := tm.Clock()

    return unixTS - int64(hour*3600+minute*60+second)
}

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