Suppose I want to have REST endpoints which look roughly like this:

/user/
/user/user_id 

/user/user_id/items/
/user/user_id/items/item_id

CRUD on each if makes sense. For example, /user POST creates a new user, GET fetches all users. /user/user_id GET fetches just that one user.

Items are user specific so I put them under user_id, which is a particular user.

Now to make Express routing modular I made a few router instances. There is a router for user, and a router for the item.

var userRouter = require('express').Router();
userRouter.route('/')
  .get(function() {})
  .post(function() {})
userRouter.route('/:user_id')
  .get(function() {})

var itemRouter = require('express').Router();
itemRouter.route('/')
  .get(function() {})
  .post(function() {})
itemRouter.route('/:item_id')
  .get(function() {})

app.use('/users', userRouter);

// Now how to add the next router?
// app.use('/users/', itemRouter);

URL to item is descendents of the URL hierarchy of the user. Now how do I get URL with /users whatever to userRouter but the more specific route of /user/*user_id*/items/ to the itemRouter? And also, I would like user_id to be accessible to itemRouter as well, if possible.

  • Great answers already on using Express to solve this. You could, however, use Loopback (built on Express) to implement a Swagger-based API and add relations between models to perform the CRUD like you asked. Nice thing is after initial learning curve, it is much faster to assemble. loopback.io – Mike S. Aug 26 '15 at 21:04
  • @MikeS. Thanks for sharing – huggie Aug 29 '15 at 5:37
up vote 195 down vote accepted
+50

You can nest routers by attaching them as middleware on an other router, with or without params.

You must pass {mergeParams: true} to the child router if you want to access the params from the parent router.

mergeParams was introduced in Express 4.5.0 (Jul 5 2014)

In this example the itemRouter gets attached to the userRouter on the /:userId/items route

This will result in following possible routes:

GET /user -> hello user
GET /user/5 -> hello user 5
GET /user/5/items -> hello items from user 5
GET /user/5/items/6 -> hello item 6 from user 5

var express = require('express');
var app = express();

var userRouter = express.Router();
// you need to set mergeParams: true on the router,
// if you want to access params from the parent router
var itemRouter = express.Router({mergeParams: true});

// you can nest routers by attaching them as middleware:
userRouter.use('/:userId/items', itemRouter);

userRouter.route('/')
    .get(function (req, res) {
        res.status(200)
            .send('hello users');
    });

userRouter.route('/:userId')
    .get(function (req, res) {
        res.status(200)
            .send('hello user ' + req.params.userId);
    });

itemRouter.route('/')
    .get(function (req, res) {
        res.status(200)
            .send('hello items from user ' + req.params.userId);
    });

itemRouter.route('/:itemId')
    .get(function (req, res) {
        res.status(200)
            .send('hello item ' + req.params.itemId + ' from user ' + req.params.userId);
    });

app.use('/user', userRouter);

app.listen(3003);
  • 2
    Thanks for the answer. The router you uses here is more explicitly nested than the one shared by Jordonias. But does it works the same underneath the hood? I would like to grant you the bounty for comprehensiveness but I cannot do it until a few hours later. – huggie Aug 15 '14 at 5:29
  • Thanks for the answer. Is there a similar way to get from the child route the query params of the parent route? – cwarny Sep 23 '14 at 14:40
  • 1
    It would surprise me if they aren't available on any route, as the query param aren't tied to any route in specific... – Willem D'Haeseleer Sep 23 '14 at 14:42
  • Thanks...saved lot of my time – user850234 Dec 9 '15 at 8:15
  • Very thorough answer! One question: for the sake of encapsulation and separation of knowledge between the user router and the item router is there a declarative way to specify that a subrouter requires a parameter? In other words, is there an explicit way to write the registration or access calls such that the item router lets us know it expects to be passed a user id? Example situation, the item router is in another file altogether, structurally it isn't clear that it requires a user unless you get into its calls and it's only clear in the user router that it would pass a user id – yo.ian.g Sep 10 '16 at 19:09

manageable nested routes...

I wanted a specific example of doing nested routes in a very manageable way in express 4 and this was the top search result for "nested routes in express". Here's an API that would have many routes that would need to be broken up for example.

./index.js:

var app = require('express')();

// anything beginning with "/api" will go into this
app.use('/api', require('./routes/api'));

app.listen(3000);

./routes/api/index.js:

var router = require('express').Router();

// split up route handling
router.use('/products', require('./products'));
router.use('/categories', require('./categories'));
// etc.

module.exports = router;

./routes/api/products.js:

var router = require('express').Router();

// api/products
router.get('/', function(req, res) {
  res.json({ products: [] });
});

// api/products/:id
router.get('/:id', function(req, res) {
  res.json({ id: req.params.id });
});

module.exports = router;

Nesting example in folder structure

I noticed some comments on "nesting folder structure". It is implied in this however not obvious so I added the section below. Here's a specific example of a nested folder structure for routes.

index.js
/api
  index.js
  /admin
    index.js
    /users
      index.js
      list.js
    /permissions
      index.js
      list.js

This is more a general example of how node works. If you use "index.js" in folders similarly to how "index.html" works in web pages for a directory default, this will be easy to scale your organization based off of recursion without changing your entry points to code. "index.js" is the default document accessed when using require in a directory.

contents of index.js

const express = require('express');
const router = express.Router();
router.use('/api', require('./api'));
module.exports = router;

contents of /api/index.js

const express = require('express');
const router = express.Router();
router.use('/admin', require('./admin'));
module.exports = router;

contents of /api/admin/index.js

const express = require('express');
const router = express.Router();
router.use('/users', require('./users'));
router.use('/permissions', require('./permissions'));
module.exports = router;

contents of /api/admin/users/index.js

const express = require('express');
const router = express.Router();
router.get('/', require('./list'));
module.exports = router;

There is some DRY issues here possibly but it does lend itself well to encapsulation of concerns.

FYI, recently I got into actionhero and have found it to be full featured w/sockets and tasks, more like a true framework all-in-one flipping the REST paradigm on its head. You should probably check it out over going naked w/ express.

  • 11
    I like how readable this code is. – Lucky Soni Jan 6 '16 at 20:51
  • 2
    Exactly what I was looking for. Great answer, Jason. – Jeffpowrs Aug 15 '16 at 18:22
  • 7
    I see how this splits up the routes, but how does it address nesting? – 1252748 Sep 15 '16 at 19:48
  • perfect....and makes sense. This is a scalable option. I would be curious to know how the op will implement versioning (v1, v2 etc) – Kermit_ice_tea Sep 17 '17 at 6:31
  • Exactly what I was looking for. (Y) – Ali Azhar Dec 23 '17 at 9:55
var userRouter = require('express').Router();
var itemRouter = require('express').Router({ mergeParams: true }); 

userRouter.route('/')
  .get(function(req, res) {})
  .post(function(req, res) {})
userRouter.route('/:user_id')
  .get(function() {})

itemRouter.route('/')
  .get(function(req, res) {})
  .post(function(req, res) {})
itemRouter.route('/:item_id')
  .get(function(req, res) {
    return res.send(req.params);
  });

app.use('/user/', userRouter);
app.use('/user/:user_id/item', itemRouter);

The key to the second part of your question is the use of the mergeParams option

var itemRouter = require('express').Router({ mergeParams: true }); 

From /user/jordan/item/cat I get a reponse:

{"user_id":"jordan","item_id":"cat"}
  • Cool. Both yours and Willem's method works for what I wanted. I'll check his for comprehensiveness but I'll mark you up as well. Thanks a lot. Your method doesn't look nested but it pretty much does what I wanted I think I even prefer yours. Thanks. – huggie Aug 15 '14 at 5:26
  • the mergeParams option is key here! – MrE Feb 7 '16 at 3:01

Using @Jason Sebring solution, and adapting for Typescript.

server.ts

import Routes from './api/routes';
app.use('/api/', Routes);

/api/routes/index.ts

import { Router } from 'express';
import HomeRoutes from './home';

const router = Router();

router.use('/', HomeRoutes);
// add other routes...

export default router;

/api/routes/home.ts

import { Request, Response, Router } from 'express';

const router = Router();

router.get('/', (req: Request, res: Response) => {
  res.json({
    message: 'Welcome to API',
  });
});

export default router;
  • Could you provide ./api/routes? – Julian Feb 8 at 8:08
  • 1
    @Julian: I've fixed file locations. ./api/routes has two files index.ts and home.ts. The first one is used by server.ts. Hope it will help you. – Pierre R-A Feb 8 at 11:09

You need only one router, and use it like this:

router.get('/users');
router.get('/users/:user_id');

router.get('/users/:user_id/items');
router.get('/users/:user_id/items/:item_id');

app.use('api/v1', router);
  • Yes but I want to separate the logics between the items and the users, and so I prefer to separate them though. I don't know if it's possible. – huggie Aug 14 '14 at 9:43
  • @huggie items belong to users right, why do you need to seperate that? you can define them in different files still using the same router if you want that. – eguneys Aug 14 '14 at 9:45
  • It belongs to user but I want to be able to easily plug it in or out without effecting user. And currently I have each router for a different URL endpoints. The style seems to be encouraged by express-generator. If it's not possible, then yeah maybe I should send the router instance to different files? But that's not consistent to the original structures. – huggie Aug 14 '14 at 9:51
  • Is it possible to add one router underneath another? Since Express middleware architecture seems to be handled by router underneath (I'm not entirely sure if it is) I think it could be possible. – huggie Aug 14 '14 at 9:55
  • 2
    -1 This is not answering the question that is about nested routers – Willem D'Haeseleer Aug 14 '14 at 10:02

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.