34

I'm a bit surprised to find the results of the following code, where I simply want to remove all 3s from a sequence of ints:

var sequence = new [] { 1, 1, 2, 3 };
var result = sequence.SkipWhile(i => i == 3); // Oh noes! Returns { 1, 1, 2, 3 }

Why isn't 3 skipped?

My next thought was, OK, the Except operator will do the trick:

var sequence = new [] { 1, 1, 2, 3 };
var result = sequence.Except(i => i == 3); // Oh noes! Returns { 1, 2 }

In summary,

  • Except removes the 3, but also removes non-distinct elements. Grr.
  • SkipWhile doesn't skip the last element, even if it matches the condition. Grr.

Can someone explain why SkipWhile doesn't skip the last element? And can anyone suggest what LINQ operator I can use to remove the '3' from the sequence above?

0

6 Answers 6

69

It's not broken. SkipWhile will only skip items in the beginning of the IEnumerable<T>. Once that condition isn't met it will happily take the rest of the elements. Other elements that later match it down the road won't be skipped.

int[] sequence = { 3, 3, 1, 1, 2, 3 };
var result = sequence.SkipWhile(i => i == 3); 
// Result: 1, 1, 2, 3
8
  • 10
    i just got burned by this because the MSDN documentation doesn't specify that. what gives? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…
    – Stan R.
    Sep 12, 2012 at 19:28
  • 7
    @StanR. - perhaps you need to read the documentation more carefully? "Bypasses elements in a sequence as long as a specified condition is true and then returns the remaining elements"
    – JDB
    Sep 28, 2012 at 17:05
  • 25
    @Cyborgx37 i'm sorry but that documentation is vague and misleading. Remaining elements does not mean remainder of elements. In this context it means "remaining elements that do not match the specified condition". If the documentation was as clear as you think it is, it wouldn't cause enough confusion to have a question asked about it on SO.
    – Stan R.
    Sep 28, 2012 at 17:21
  • 3
    @StanR. - Not saying that it's the clearest documentation in the world, but it does say exactly what the function does if you read it carefully.
    – JDB
    Sep 28, 2012 at 18:11
  • 5
    @Cyborgx37 yes that is true, but the same could be said for the other case. Basically the documentation is ambiguous.
    – Stan R.
    Sep 28, 2012 at 18:45
23
var result = sequence.Where(i => i != 3);
2
  • 10
    @Nagg TakeWhile would return nothing on a sequence that started with 3, such as {3,1,2,3}. The desired result is to filter out all 3s, which is what Where is for. Mar 26, 2010 at 22:14
  • Uhh, wow, it's Friday alright. Where operator will do the trick, of course. [duh]. Still, doesn't answer why SkipWhile doesn't work as expected. Mar 26, 2010 at 22:20
4

The SkipWhile and TakeWhile operators skip or return elements from a sequence while a predicate function passes (returns True). The first element that doesn’t pass the predicate function ends the process of evaluation.

//Bypasses elements in a sequence as long as a specified condition is true and returns the remaining elements.

3

One solution you may find useful is using List "FindAll" function.

List <int> aggregator = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4 };
List<int> result = aggregator.FindAll(b => b != 3);
1

Ahmad already answered your question, but here's another option:

var result = from i in sequence where i != 3 select i;
-1

Bypasses elements in a sequence as long as a specified condition is true and then returns the remaining elements.

still u want to use skipwhile then do it orderby then apply skipwhile

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