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This question already has an answer here:

I need to change a date/time from 2014-08-20 15:30:00 to look like 08/20/2014 3:30 pm

Can this be done using javascript's Date object?

marked as duplicate by Peter O., Derek 朕會功夫 javascript Aug 13 '14 at 1:15

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  • 2
    Date() should parse that. Assign that to a variable and then use the methods available to you to construct the format you want. They're here. – vch Aug 12 '14 at 23:29
  • It is better to use Intl.DateTimeFormat in Javascript and set an option for that. it is simple and more flexible. please see my post for more details. link. and online solution for your answer: online answer – Iman Bahrampour Oct 13 '17 at 8:23
99

Yes, you can use the native javascript Date() object and its methods.

For instance you can create a function like:

function formatDate(date) {
  var hours = date.getHours();
  var minutes = date.getMinutes();
  var ampm = hours >= 12 ? 'pm' : 'am';
  hours = hours % 12;
  hours = hours ? hours : 12; // the hour '0' should be '12'
  minutes = minutes < 10 ? '0'+minutes : minutes;
  var strTime = hours + ':' + minutes + ' ' + ampm;
  return date.getMonth()+1 + "/" + date.getDate() + "/" + date.getFullYear() + "  " + strTime;
}

var d = new Date();
var e = formatDate(d);

alert(e);

And display also the am / pm and the correct time.

Remember to use getFullYear() method and not getYear() because it has been deprecated.

DEMO http://jsfiddle.net/a_incarnati/kqo10jLb/4/

  • 2
    I'm the first that use moment.js but in this case the question is very clear: Javascript format date / time. I answered to this a while back, in 2012 and I believe that It's always good to be able to use native js methods. Nowadays these libraries, like moment.js are even better, so it's really up to the developer if to use a library or rely purely on the language. – Alessandro Incarnati Oct 22 '15 at 6:45
  • Well, the answer is technically correct. Also, the question asked how Date object could be used for this, so technically, that's probably the most accurate answer to the question, if taken literally. However, such answer gives many programmers the feeling, that copying&pasting this snippet of code is what they should do, when facing such problem. That's IMO wrong. – Tomas Kulich Oct 23 '15 at 14:03
  • 2
    The month went wrong to me. Just worked fine when i used (), like (date.getMonth()+1). – Tiago Gouvêa Jul 23 '16 at 15:16
  • Why not put "new Date();" into the function, and then just formatDate(somestring)? Then you have one object constructor instead of fifty. – HoldOffHunger Mar 5 '18 at 22:30
64

Please do not reinvent the wheel. There are many open-source & COTS solutions that already exist to solve this problem.

Please take a look at the following JavaScript libraries:


Demo

I wrote a one-liner using Moment.js below. You can check out the demo here: JSFiddle.

moment('2014-08-20 15:30:00').format('MM/DD/YYYY h:mm a'); // 08/20/2014 3:30 pm
  • Had to convert a JSON array to work with a scheduler widget. This solution allowed me to nail it in under 5 minutes. Bravo. – Krafty Apr 26 '15 at 23:44
  • 41
    Wow, 12k just to format a date/time? There are times when reinventing the wheel makes perfect sense. If you are doing a lot of date manipulation then a library is the correct approach. If you need a one off solution with a smaller footprint then you could try stackoverflow.com/q/6312993/132599. – David Clarke Oct 26 '15 at 20:46
  • 4
    Sometimes a library is not an option (for example when using javascript on a couchdb database on a Cloudant server). – mtnpaul Jan 9 '16 at 8:47
  • 3
    "reinventing the wheel" - more like putting on a new tire, maybe a snow tire for more efficient traction! moments.js is like insisting on using 4 wheel drive on dry pavement.... – user2677034 Mar 1 '17 at 21:34
  • 2
    Plain Javascript actually is the wheel, and if people didn't try to reinvent it, great things like Moment.js wouldn't be around. – Dan Chase Oct 15 '18 at 18:21
15

For the date part:(month is 0-indexed while days are 1-indexed)

var date = new Date('2014-8-20');
console.log((date.getMonth()+1) + '/' + date.getDate() + '/' +  date.getFullYear());

for the time you'll want to create a function to test different situations and convert.

11

I don't think that can be done RELIABLY with built in methods on the native Date object. The toLocaleString method gets close, but if I am remembering correctly, it won't work correctly in IE < 10. If you are able to use a library for this task, MomentJS is a really amazing library; and it makes working with dates and times easy. Otherwise, I think you will have to write a basic function to give you the format that you are after.

function formatDate(date) {
    var year = date.getFullYear(),
        month = date.getMonth() + 1, // months are zero indexed
        day = date.getDate(),
        hour = date.getHours(),
        minute = date.getMinutes(),
        second = date.getSeconds(),
        hourFormatted = hour % 12 || 12, // hour returned in 24 hour format
        minuteFormatted = minute < 10 ? "0" + minute : minute,
        morning = hour < 12 ? "am" : "pm";

    return month + "/" + day + "/" + year + " " + hourFormatted + ":" +
            minuteFormatted + morning;
}
  • if (month < 10) month = '0' + month; if (day < 10) day = '0' + day; you can add this before return statement to make the date look more ergonomic. – Sadik anass Aug 13 '18 at 17:47
1

You can do that:

function formatAMPM(date) { // This is to display 12 hour format like you asked
  var hours = date.getHours();
  var minutes = date.getMinutes();
  var ampm = hours >= 12 ? 'pm' : 'am';
  hours = hours % 12;
  hours = hours ? hours : 12; // the hour '0' should be '12'
  minutes = minutes < 10 ? '0'+minutes : minutes;
  var strTime = hours + ':' + minutes + ' ' + ampm;
  return strTime;
}

var myDate = new Date();
var displayDate = myDate.getMonth()+ '/' +myDate.getDate()+ '/' +myDate.getFullYear()+ ' ' +formatAMPM(myDate);
console.log(displayDate);

Fiddle

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