39

I only know how I can generate a random boolean value (true/false). The default probability is 50:50

But how can I generate a true false value with my own probability? Let's say it returns true with a probability of 40:60 or 20:80 etc...

2
  • 3
    Generate a random number between 1 and 100 and compare it to your distribution?
    – David
    Aug 12 '14 at 23:46
  • What you did so far?
    – Lior Elrom
    Aug 12 '14 at 23:59
63

Well, one way is Random.Next(100) <= 20 ? true : false, using the integer value of NextInt to force your own probability. I can't speak to the true 'randomness' of this method though.

More detailed example:

Random gen = new Random();
int prob = gen.Next(100);
return prob <= 20;
3
  • 1
    I would dare to assume that the predictability of these boolean values is just as random as Random.Next() would be. I don't know if that is the same as it's randomness though.
    – oɔɯǝɹ
    Jul 27 '16 at 20:00
  • 1
    For me, in ASP.Net the working syntax turned out a little more elaborate: myRandomBool = new Random().Next(100) <= 50 ? true : false
    – GerardV
    Jul 2 '19 at 19:32
  • 2
    @E. Moffat: ? true : false is redundant code.
    – Alain
    Mar 4 '21 at 12:14
22

You generate a random number up to 100 exclusive and see if it's less than a given percent. Example:

if(random.Next(100) < 40) {
  // will be true 40% of the time
}

More generally, for a probability of X/Y, use an idiom like:

if(random.Next(Y) < X)
15

Here is an extension method that will provide a random bool with specified probability (in percentage) of being true;

public static bool NextBool(this Random r, int truePercentage = 50)
{
    return r.NextDouble() < truePercentage / 100.0;
}

you can use this like

Random r = new Random();
r.NextBool(); // returns true or false with equal probability
r.NextBool(20); // 20% chance to be true;
r.NextBool(100); // always return true
r.NextBool(0); // always return false
8

Assuming your probability is represented as double between 0.0 and 1.0, I would implement it more simply like this:

Random rand = new Random();
...
double trueProbability = 0.2;
bool result = rand.NextDouble() < trueProbability;

result will be true with the probability given by trueProbability

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.random.nextdouble(v=vs.110).aspx

If this isn't "random enough", you can take a look at RNGCryptoServiceProvider:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.security.cryptography.rngcryptoserviceprovider(v=vs.110).aspx

3
  • to be fully representative of the trueProbability shouldn't you do a <= instead of < test? Jun 23 '15 at 22:51
  • 1
    @hubsonbropa No, since NextDouble() returns a value between 0 (inclusive) and 1 (exclusive). If you extrapolate to 100% probability, < 1 is sufficient.
    – Mike
    Jun 23 '15 at 22:57
  • 1
    @hubsonbropa Also, 0% should never be true. The only way to cover that case is to check for < 0.
    – Mike
    Jun 23 '15 at 23:31
3

I think it can help you

Random gen = new Random();
bool result = gen.Next(100) < 50 ? true : false;
1
  • 7
    The expression gen.Next(100) < 50 is boolean expression. No need to use the conditional operator here. Jul 9 '15 at 4:23
0

For future knowledge:

40:60 would be:

var random = new Random();
return random.Next(10) < 4;

20:80 would be:

var random = new Random();
return random.Next(5) == 0

and 1:1 would be:

var random = new Random();
return random.Next(2) == 1;

Note: Just shorten the probability to the shortest variant - as for example: "random.Next(5) == 0" is quicker then "random.Next(100) <= 20 Though - if the probability changes from the user input - then it would look like:

[ModifierByChoice] bool GetProbability(int trueProbability, int falseProbability)
{
var random = new Random();
return random.Next(trueProbability, trueProbability + falseProbability) < trueProbability;
}
1
  • By reducing the fractions, the numbers written in the code suddenly become magical numbers. Unless you can and actually do prove that there is a significant slowdown by using larger numbers, the advice of reducing the fractions is counterproductive. Furthermore it may confuse beginning programmers that you sometimes use the < operator and sometimes the ==, once even comparing to zero and the other time comparing to nonzero. Feb 11 '19 at 18:22
-3
Random gen = new Random();
var boolVal = gen.Next(0, 1)==1? true : false;
1
  • The question was: But how can I generate a true false value with my own probability? Let's say it returns true with a probability of 40:60 or 20:80 etc.... This answer is wrong.
    – Pang
    May 3 '16 at 1:28

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