4

I saw %f mostly in tow different occasions. first, in printf which [I think] I know the usage but not the logic:

System.out.printf("%.2f", 3.1415); // will print 2 digits after decimal!

and also for formatting floats like in nextFloat() random generator which I neither know the usage nor the logic behind:

Random random1 = new Random(100);
float g0 = Math.abs(random1.nextFloat()); // 0.7220096
float g1 = Math.abs(random1.nextFloat() %.1f); // 0.0346627
float g2 = Math.abs(random1.nextFloat() %1f); // 0.19497603
float g3 = Math.abs(random1.nextFloat()) %1f; // 0.7158033

I googled to find some explanation but I wasn't sure which category I should search. (is this a regular expression or flag ... ?) Can somebody give me some example and explain how it works exactly?

1
  • 1
    The first % sign in the printf is used for formatting. The second is just the modulus operator. – Thihara Aug 13 '14 at 4:01
3

The random1.nextFloat() %.1f

is basically using the modulo(remainder) operator to the random float. It is not used for formatting.

lets look at the bytecode: of float g0 = Math.abs(random1.nextFloat() % .1f); // 0.7220096

      public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
    Code:
       0: new           #16                 // class java/util/Random
       3: dup
       4: ldc2_w        #18                 // long 100l
       7: invokespecial #20                 // Method java/util/Random."<init>":
(J)V
      10: astore_1
      11: aload_1
      12: invokevirtual #23                 // Method java/util/Random.nextFloat
:()F
      15: ldc           #27                 // float 0.1f
      17: frem
      18: invokestatic  #28                 // Method java/lang/Math.abs:(F)F
      21: fstore_2
      22: return
}

As you can see directly the 0.1f is a float not a String modifier.

Now for System.out.printf("%.2f", 3.1415);

  public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
    Code:
       0: getstatic     #16                 // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/
io/PrintStream;
       3: ldc           #22                 // String %.2f
       5: iconst_1
       6: anewarray     #3                  // class java/lang/Object
       9: dup
      10: iconst_0
      11: ldc2_w        #24                 // double 3.1415d
      14: invokestatic  #26                 // Method java/lang/Double.valueOf:(
D)Ljava/lang/Double;
      17: aastore
      18: invokevirtual #32                 // Method java/io/PrintStream.printf
:(Ljava/lang/String;[Ljava/lang/Object;)Ljava/io/PrintStream;
      21: pop
      22: return
}

Now you can see that it is now a String modifier(// String %.2f) not a type float

1
  • I thought this was a much clearer answer before the bytecode update (documentation of printf, mentioning that the first % was in a string with special format-string meaning, and mentioning that the second % was in an expression might be a more relatable explanation), but +1 anyways. – Jason C Aug 13 '14 at 4:06
4

That's not a formatting issue - you're calculating modulus!

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