144

Each time I use pushd or popd, it print the stack to standard output. How not to do so?

I don't want to do pushd > /dev/null each time because I have a lot of scripts calling each other.

Maybe a nice override will do it, but I'll need to override these builtins only in my scripts, and then restore the correct behavior.

4
  • 7
    If someone came across this question wanting to silence a single occurrence you can replace pushd and popd with cd and cd ~-. ~- is a tilde expansion that sets to $OLDPWD. Commented Sep 30, 2019 at 19:35
  • @AgustínLado cd - also works. Not sure which version is more compatible with wide range of systems. Commented Jan 27, 2020 at 14:04
  • 2
    @ShipluMokaddim: Without tilde it prints the folder name (at least on Ubuntu 18.04 running on WSL).
    – astraujums
    Commented Feb 5, 2020 at 17:39
  • 5
    If you have a sequence of commands between a cd some/path and a cd - or cd "${return_wd}" or something similar, consider grouping the commands in between into a function and use a subshell like (cd some/path; your_commands_here). The directory navigation back to the old PWD is implied at the end of the subshell. Also works for command substitutions. Commented Aug 23, 2020 at 17:46

3 Answers 3

201

You could add

pushd () {
    command pushd "$@" > /dev/null
}

popd () {
    command popd "$@" > /dev/null
}

to the top of each script. This is probably the minimum amount of work it will take to solve your problem.

12
  • If you want to silence errors (e.g. no such directory) too, then you can use &> instead of > Commented Apr 16, 2017 at 17:36
  • 7
    Be careful when silencing errors: you could create a hard to diagnose failure at a later date. Make sure you check for a not-OK return code and respond to it accordingly. Commented Oct 16, 2019 at 11:21
  • This is the least invasive option. Commented Jan 26, 2020 at 9:08
  • 1
    @xdevs23 || exit $? is equivalent to just || exit. Same for return. Commented Aug 23, 2020 at 17:51
  • 1
    @bmacnaughton It doesn't have any required arguments; it accepts -n and a whole family of -N and +N (for an integer N) arguments.
    – chepner
    Commented Sep 6, 2020 at 18:51
15

In zsh you can setopt PUSHDSILENT. Put this in your ~/.zshrc.

4
  • 4
    Or use popd -q (quiet).
    – rxw
    Commented Dec 18, 2018 at 5:00
  • 6
    popd doesn't have -q option
    – MarekN
    Commented Jan 20, 2019 at 10:03
  • 4
    @MarekN: the previous comment of "popd -q" was referring to zsh, not bash, even though the original question was tagged as wanting bash answers, not zsh.
    – b-jazz
    Commented Feb 19, 2019 at 18:19
  • 5
    This is a nice comment or a tangent to an answer, but it doesn't belong as a standalone answer to a question that isn't asking about zsh.
    – chepner
    Commented Jan 26, 2020 at 14:25
3

In your .profile file (what ever it is called in your system) add:

pushd () {
    command pushd "$@" > /dev/null
}

popd () {
    command popd "$@" > /dev/null
}

export pushd popd
2
  • 21
    This affects entire of the system... personally, I don't recommend this way . .
    – Sean83
    Commented Jul 22, 2017 at 3:53
  • Is it the export that affects the entire system? If you leave that part out, do you lose anything? Commented May 20 at 23:16

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