129

There seem to be a .CFI directive after every line and also there are wide varities of these ex.,.cfi_startproc , .cfi_endproc etc.. more here.

    .file   "temp.c"
    .text
.globl main
    .type   main, @function
main:
.LFB0:
    .cfi_startproc
    pushq   %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    .cfi_offset 6, -16
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 6
    movl    $0, %eax
    leave
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE0:
    .size   main, .-main
.globl func
    .type   func, @function
func:
.LFB1:
    .cfi_startproc
    pushq   %rbp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    .cfi_offset 6, -16
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 6
    movl    %edi, -4(%rbp)
    movl    %esi, %eax
    movb    %al, -8(%rbp)
    leave
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE1:
    .size   func, .-func
    .ident  "GCC: (Ubuntu 4.4.1-4ubuntu9) 4.4.1"
    .section    .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

I didn't get the purpose of these.

2

5 Answers 5

150

To disable these, use the gcc option

-fno-asynchronous-unwind-tables

-fno-dwarf2-cfi-asm may be needed also.

3
  • 14
    -fno-dwarf2-cfi-asm may be needed also Mar 11, 2016 at 18:55
  • 1
    If you're disabling it for human-readable asm output, see How to remove "noise" from GCC/clang assembly output? for other useful options and tricks. Jan 11, 2020 at 4:17
  • 1
    Interesting to note that the answer how to disable them got more upvotes than those which describe what are they :)
    – mathway
    Oct 19, 2021 at 23:27
75

I've got a feeling it stands for Call Frame Information and is a GNU AS extension to manage call frames. From DeveloperWorks:

On some architectures, exception handling must be managed with Call Frame Information directives. These directives are used in the assembly to direct exception handling. These directives are available on Linux on POWER, if, for any reason (portability of the code base, for example), the GCC generated exception handling information is not sufficient.

It looks like these are generated on some platforms depending on need for exception handling.

If you are looking to disable these, please see David's answer.

2
31

The CFI directives are used for debugging. It allows the debugger to unwind a stack. For example: if procedure A calls procedure B which then calls a common procedure C. Procedure C fails. You now want to know who actually called C and then you may want to know who called B.

A debugger can unwind this stack by using the stack pointer (%rsp) and register %rbp, however it needs to know how to find them. That is where the CFI directives come in.

movq    %rsp, %rbp
.cfi_def_cfa_register 6

so the last line here tell it that the "Call frame address" is now in register 6 (%rbp)

4
  • 2
    But exception handling usage of cfi should be more frequent than debugging, I think.
    – osgx
    May 8, 2014 at 23:12
  • 6
    Actually CFA stands for "canonical frame address". See here.
    – Cameron
    Jun 3, 2014 at 16:38
  • 1
    CFI directives allow stack-unwinding even for code compiled with -fomit-frame-pointer, as an alternative to RBP (which is on by default with gcc or clang -O1 and higher). It's used by C++ exception handling as well as debuggers / profilers. In code with traditional RBP frame pointers, the current RBP value always points at a saved RBP value, and that points at the previous one forming a linked list. There's no need for CFI in that case. (Although in functions that use a frame pointer, CFI cfa_register avoids needing more metadata for every RSP change, like you're showing.) Jan 11, 2020 at 4:22
4

To disable these, g++ needs -fno-exceptions along with the previously mentioned -fno-asynchronous-unwind-tables, provided that you don't use exceptions.

0

Well,it just stands for control flow integrity. They are essentially information items passed to debuggers and other tools to describe the intended flow of the program.

6
  • No, it's Call Frame Information. Control Flow Integrity is a general class of technologies (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Control-flow_integrity), including Intel CFE (Control Flow Enforcement) that uses CPU instructions like endbr. I don't think any control-flow integrity stuff uses the stack-unwind metadata generated by .cfi_* directives. Nov 12, 2021 at 9:08
  • In the Learn to Program with Assembly Foundational Learning for New Programmers, chapter 13.6 Annotating Code. "Within functions, a set of directives known as CFI (control flow integrity) directives tell debuggers about where you are within a function. These are rather complicated, but if you see directives starting with .cfi_, they are essentially information items passed to debuggers and other tools to describe the intended flow of the program. "
    – kingkong
    Nov 15, 2021 at 4:09
  • That book is wrong. GAS: Explanation of .cfi_def_cfa_offset cites the DWARF specification, which is the format for debug into, and the .eh_frame unwind info these directives create. See also What are CFI directives in Gnu Assembler (GAS) used for? / What do the CFI directives mean? (and some more questions) (Unfortunately the GAS manual section for them doesn't expand the acronym) Nov 15, 2021 at 4:17
  • (Your book is only partly right about what the directives even do. They create stack unwind info that lets debuggers find the return address given the current RIP. They don't tell a debugger the intended flow of the program, just changes to RSP, or the fact that a function is using RBP as a frame pointer. Probably the author googled CFI and found en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Control-flow_integrity which is another CS / engineering concept that uses the same initials.) Nov 15, 2021 at 4:18
  • Ok, I believe you now.Thanks for correction.
    – kingkong
    Nov 18, 2021 at 2:17

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