12

I have an argument for a program that is an integer from 1-100 and I just don't like the way that it shows up in the -h help message when using argparse (it literally lists 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,... etc)

Is there any way to change this or have it represented in another way?

Thanks

EDIT:

Here is the code for those who asked:

norse = parser.add_argument_group('Norse')
norse.add_argument('-n', '--norse', required=False, help='Run the Norse IPViking scan.', action='store_true')
norse.add_argument('--threshold', required=False, type=int, choices=range(0,101), help='Threshold (0-100) denoting at what threat level to provide additional data on an IP \
                        address. Default is 49.', default=49)
4
  • Can you post your code example? Aug 13 '14 at 20:29
  • API doesn't suggest anything, may be rather than using choices, you can implement your own check. Aug 13 '14 at 20:32
  • You could try looking at argparse.ArgumentDefaultsHelpFormatter, I haven't used it myself, but it might provide the kind of customization you need. Aug 13 '14 at 20:35
  • Yeah I was thinking about simply ditching the built in check and running my own, but it would be nice if I could keep it within the argparse... oh well. Aug 13 '14 at 20:37
23

Use the metavar parameter of add_argument().

For example:

norse = parser.add_argument_group('Norse')
norse.add_argument('-n', '--norse', required=False, help='Run the Norse IPViking scan.', action='store_true')
norse.add_argument('--threshold', required=False, type=int, choices=range(0,101),
                   metavar="[0-100]", 
                   help='Threshold (0-100) denoting at what threat level to provide additional data on an IP \
                        address. Default is 49.', default=49)

Test:

from argparse import ArgumentParser

norse = ArgumentParser()

norse.add_argument('-n', '--norse', required=False, help='Run the Norse IPViking scan.', action='store_true')
norse.add_argument('--threshold', required=False, type=int, choices=range(0,101), metavar="[0-100]", help='Threshold (0-100) denoting at what threat level to provide additional data on an IP address. Default is 49.', default=49)


norse.print_help()

Results

usage: -c [-h] [-n] [--threshold [0-100]]

optional arguments:
  -h, --help           show this help message and exit
  -n, --norse          Run the Norse IPViking scan.
  --threshold [0-100]  Threshold (0-100) denoting at what threat level to
                       provide additional data on an IP address. Default is
                       49.
2
8

You can customize action, e.g:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import argparse


class Range(argparse.Action):
    def __init__(self, minimum=None, maximum=None, *args, **kwargs):
        self.min = minimum
        self.max = maximum
        kwargs["metavar"] = "[%d-%d]" % (self.min, self.max)
        super(Range, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

    def __call__(self, parser, namespace, value, option_string=None):
        if not (self.min <= value <= self.max):
            msg = 'invalid choice: %r (choose from [%d-%d])' % \
                (value, self.min, self.max)
            raise argparse.ArgumentError(self, msg)
        setattr(namespace, self.dest, value)


norse = argparse.ArgumentParser('Norse')
norse.add_argument('--threshold', required=False, type=int, min=0, max=100,
                   action=Range,
                   help='Threshold [%(min)d-%(max)d] denoting at what threat \
                         level to provide additional data on an IP address. \
                         Default is %(default)s.', default=49)
args = norse.parse_args()
print args

Test it:

~: user$ ./test.py --threshold 10
Namespace(threshold=10)
~: user$ ./test.py --threshold -1
usage: Norse [-h] [--threshold [0-100]]
Norse: error: argument --threshold: invalid choice: -1 (choose from [0-100])
~: user$ ./test.py -h
usage: Norse [-h] [--threshold [0-100]]

optional arguments:
  -h, --help           show this help message and exit
  --threshold [0-100]  Threshold [0-100] denoting at what threat level to
                       provide additional data on an IP address. Default is
                       49.
1
  • 2
    I would customize the type rather than the action.
    – hpaulj
    Aug 14 '14 at 3:44
6

With a custom type, it is easier to control the error message (via the ArgumentTypeError). I still need the metavar to control the usage display.

import argparse

def range_type(astr, min=0, max=101):
    value = int(astr)
    if min<= value <= max:
        return value
    else:
        raise argparse.ArgumentTypeError('value not in range %s-%s'%(min,max))

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
norse = parser.add_argument_group('Norse')
...
norse.add_argument('--range', type=range_type, 
    help='Value in range: Default is %(default)s.',
    default=49, metavar='[0-101]')
parser.print_help()
print parser.parse_args()

producing:

2244:~/mypy$ python2.7 stack25295487.py --ran 102
usage: stack25295487.py [-h] [-n] [--threshold [0:101]] [--range [0-101]]

optional arguments:
  -h, --help           show this help message and exit

Norse:
  ...
  --range [0-101]      Value in range: Default is 49.
usage: stack25295487.py [-h] [-n] [--threshold [0:101]] [--range [0-101]]
stack25295487.py: error: argument --range: value not in range 0-101

I could use functools.partial to customize the range values:

type=partial(range_type, min=10, max=90)
0

Here are a couple ways you can do it instead

def parseCommandArgs():
    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
    parser.add_argument('-i', dest='myDest', choices=range(1,101), type=int, required=True, metavar='INT[1,100]', help='my help message')
    return parser.parse_args()

You can also use action instead, which I highly recommend since it allows more customization

def verify():
    class Validity(argparse.Action):
        def __call__(self, parser, namespace, values, option_string=None):
            if values < 1 or values > 100:
                # do something
                pass
    return Validity

def parseCommandArgs():
    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
    parser.add_argument('-i', dest='myDest', required=True, metavar='INT[1,100]', help='my help message', action=verify())
    return parser.parse_args()

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