57

I'm trying out random things to deepen my understanding of Rust. I just ran into the following error with this code:

struct Person {
    mother: Option<Person>,
    father: Option<Person>,
    partner: Option<Person>,
}

pub fn main() {
    let susan = Person {
        mother: None,
        father: None,
        partner: None,
    };

    let john = Person {
        mother: None,
        father: None,
        partner: Some(susan),
    };
}

The error is:

error[E0072]: recursive type `Person` has infinite size
 --> src/main.rs:1:1
  |
1 | struct Person {
  | ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ recursive type has infinite size
2 |     mother: Option<Person>,
  |     ---------------------- recursive without indirection
3 |     father: Option<Person>,
  |     ---------------------- recursive without indirection
4 |     partner: Option<Person>,
  |     ----------------------- recursive without indirection
  |
  = help: insert indirection (e.g., a `Box`, `Rc`, or `&`) at some point to make `Person` representable

I understand that I can fix it if I put the Person in a Box, so this works:

struct Person {
    mother: Option<Box<Person>>,
    father: Option<Box<Person>>,
    partner: Option<Box<Person>>,
}

pub fn main() {
    let susan = Person {
        mother: None,
        father: None,
        partner: None,
    };

    let john = Person {
        mother: None,
        father: None,
        partner: Some(Box::new(susan)),
    };
}

I would like to understand the full story behind that. I know that boxing means that it will be stored on the heap rather than the stack but I don't get why this indirection is necessary.

98

Data inside structs and enums (and tuples) is stored directly inline inside the memory of the struct value. Given a struct like

struct Recursive {
    x: u8,
    y: Option<Recursive>
}

let's compute the size: size_of::<Recursive>(). Clearly it has 1 byte from the x field, and then the Option has size 1 (for the discriminant) + size_of::<Recursive>() (for the contained data), so, in summary, the size is the sum:

size_of::<Recursive>() == 2 + size_of::<Recursive>()

That is, the size would have to be infinite.

Another way to look at it is just expanding Recursive repeatedly (as tuples, for clarity):

Recursive ==
(u8, Option<Recursive>) ==
(u8, Option<(u8, Option<Recursive>)>) ==
(u8, Option<(u8, Option<(u8, Option<Recursive>)>)>) ==
...

and all of this is stored inline in a single chunk of memory.

A Box<T> is a pointer, i.e. it has a fixed size, so (u8, Option<Box<Recursive>>) is 1 + 8 bytes. (One way to regard Box<T> is that it's a normal T with the guarantee that it has a fixed size.)

| improve this answer | |
  • Brilliant as usual. Thanks :) – Christoph Aug 13 '14 at 21:35
  • Mental note: An instance of the struct would only have infinite size in the case of an infinite family tree. But sizing of types is based on type information only, so if the type has a potential of storing infinite information, it needs infinite bytes allocated (on the stack). Indirection breaks this cycle by only putting the root node on the stack. – Alexander Torstling Jan 10 '19 at 8:33
  • I'm confused: If this type contains only a Option containing a reference (or None) and a u8, why must it be on the Heap? It seems memory size could be derived from reference size plus one byte for the u8 . – Jackalope Sep 17 '19 at 17:27
  • 1
    @Jackalope there's no pointers or references in the Recursive type. Do you mean a variant like struct Recursive<'a> { x: u8, y: Option<&'a Recursive<'a>> }? If so, yes, that type has finite size (the same size as the Box version) and doesn't require heap allocation. Variants using heap allocation (either Box or Rc/Arc) are the most common form of this because it's easiest to use (one can just pass around the values without needing to statically guarantee the lifetimes have the appropriate relationships). – huon Sep 18 '19 at 2:41
20

The Rust Programming Language has this to say about recursive types:

Rust needs to know at compile time how much space a type takes up. One kind of type whose size can’t be known at compile time is a recursive type where a value can have as part of itself another value of the same type. This nesting of values could theoretically continue infinitely, so Rust doesn’t know how much space a value of a recursive type needs. Boxes have a known size, however, so by inserting a box in a recursive type definition, we are allowed to have recursive types.

Basically, the struct would be of infinite size if you don't use boxing. E.g., Susan has a mother, father, and partner, each of which have a mother, father, and partner....etc. Boxing uses a pointer, which is a fixed size, and dynamic memory allocation.

| improve this answer | |
  • Ah, that makes perfect sense! Thank you! – Christoph Aug 13 '14 at 21:22
  • FYI: link is broken, because the tutorial was deprecated a long time ago. – Lukas Kalbertodt Jun 9 '17 at 14:14

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