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I've been working on a game for quite some time, and I am having a hard time debugging this one. Very, very rarely, for reasons completely unbeknownst to me, box2d "freezes". If I print the box2d profiler after each physics step, the TOI timer looks something like this:

...  
0.01  
0.01  
0.01  
400.00  
27000.00  

So the physics ticks effectively freeze the game. I know for sure that I am not accidentally creating a crazy number of fixtures/bodies.

Due to the seemingly random times it happens, I cant really come up with a reason in my code that would cause this. And since its not a crash or anything, I dont really have a hint where to look. When I pause the process to debug it, the debugger will stop somewhere in the box2d solveTOI function and I do not possess enough understanding of the code to really know what I should trace back in order to get a hint regarding where the error is on my end. What I do notice though is that several values used in the TimeOfImpact function seem to be "-1.#IND0000" according to my debugger.

If someone has an Idea where I might start looking in order to find out why this is happening, I would be incredibly thankful.

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  • Seemingly random?? Pretty hard to make any kind of guess without knowing what type of scene your simulation is running. Is it just one box sitting on the ground? ;) Also tell us which language port you are using. The presence of -1.#IND values often indicates a divide by zero somewhere previously. The -1.#IND will 'infect' any other value it is used with, so you would need to figure out where the invalidity originally started.
    – iforce2d
    Aug 14, 2014 at 11:45
  • Hey, nice to see you are checking this , iforce2d. Your stuff helped me a lot. No, the scenes have gotten rather complex with a lot of static+dynamic bodies with multiple fixtures, both sensor and none sensor. This is why its not easy for me to know where its coming from. I am using C++ with the regular box2d from their website. So, am I suspecting correctly that I could try to backtrace the -1.#IND values to somewhere and find out what is causing them? Have you ever had this problem and remember what caused it?
    – jdokke123
    Aug 15, 2014 at 9:40
  • Box2D is solid enough that I would suspect you are giving it an invalid value to deal with somewhere. In my experience, it is usually where I'm doing ApplyForce etc to control something, and my control code does not consider all possible cases, so it does something that generates a -1.#IND or NaN. You can detect a bad value at runtime by checking if it's equal to itself with the regular == operator. The equality test will return false for invalid values. You could perhaps try putting that check into the functions of the b2Vec2 class, since most values are b2Vec2 that might show it quickest.
    – iforce2d
    Aug 15, 2014 at 10:04
  • Thanks, I was able to trace back the error by setting a breakpoint like you told me to. Im glad the box2d community has you, keep doing what you do!
    – jdokke123
    Aug 15, 2014 at 11:01

1 Answer 1

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Box2D is solid enough that I would suspect you are giving it an invalid value to deal with somewhere. In my experience, it is usually where I'm doing ApplyForce etc to control something, and my control code does not consider all possible cases, so it does something that generates a -1.#IND or NaN. This makes it susceptible to user input and various unlikely-to-repeat states that can make it look random.

An -1.#IND will 'infect' any other value it is used with, so you would need to figure out where the invalidity originally started. You can detect a bad value at runtime by checking if it's equal to itself with the regular == operator. The equality test will return false for invalid values.

You could try putting that equality check into the functions of the b2Vec2 class. Since b2Vec2 is a very commonly used type, that would probably be the easiest way to cover most of the likely points where the 'infection' starts.

Eg.

void operator += (const b2Vec2& v)
{
    b2Assert( v.x == v.x ); // add this
    b2Assert( v.y == v.y ); // add this
    x += v.x; y += v.y;
}

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