2978

How do you disable autocomplete in the major browsers for a specific input (or form field)?

2
  • 4
    In some systems where testers have to manually enter a lot of information over and over it might be useful to have the option as configurable so that when testing you can disable it and just hit 'tab > down arrow > tab > down arrow etc...' – Simon_Weaver Nov 22 '09 at 5:15
  • Try github.com/terrylinooo/disableautofill.js , it uses JavaScript the skip the auto-fill function from browser. – Terry Lin Feb 25 at 8:50

89 Answers 89

8

Many modern browsers do not support autocomplete="off" for login fields anymore. autocomplete="new-password" is wokring instead, more information MDN docs

0
6

You can simply put the autocomplete="off" in the HTML fields like following code.

<input type="text" name="" value="" autocomplete="off" />
1
  • How is this different from the previous 50 answers (not a rhetorical question)? – Peter Mortensen Apr 9 at 0:04
6

No fake inputs, no javascript!

There is no way to disable autofill consistently across browsers. I have tried all the different suggestions and none of them work in all browsers. The only way is not using password input at all. Here's what I came up with:

<style type="text/css">
    @font-face {
        font-family: 'PasswordDots';
        src: url('text-security-disc.woff') format('woff');
        font-weight: normal;
        font-style: normal;
    }

    input.password {
        font-family: 'PasswordDots' !important;
        font-size: 8px !important;
    }
</style>

<input class="password" type="text" spellcheck="false" />

Download: text-security-disc.woff

Here's how my final result looks like:

Password Mask

The negative side effect is that it's possible to copy plain text from the input, though it should be possible to prevent that with some JS.

6

Chrome is planning to support this.

For now the best suggestion is to use an input type that is rarely autocompleted.

Chrome discussion

<input type='search' name="whatever" />

To be compatible with Firefox, use normal autocomplete='off'

<input type='search' name="whatever" autocomplete='off' />
6

You can disable autocomplete if you remove the form tag.

The same was done by my bank and I was wondering how they did this. It even removes the value that was already remembered by the browser after you remove the tag.

5

If your issue is having a password field being auto-completed, then you may find this useful...

We had this issue in several areas of our site where the business wanted to re-query the user for their username and password and specifically did not want the password autofill to work for contractual reasons. We found that the easiest way to do this is to put in a fake password field for the browser to find and fill while the real password field remains untouched.

<!-- This is a fake password input to defeat the browser's autofill behavior -->
<input type="password" id="txtPassword" style="display:none;" />
<!-- This is the real password input -->
<input type="password" id="txtThisIsTheRealPassword" />

Note that in Firefox and IE, it was simply enough to put any input of type password before the actual one but Chrome saw through that and forced me to actually name the fake password input (by giving it an obvious password id) to get it to "bite". I used a class to implement the style instead of using an embedded style so try that if the above doesn't work for some reason.

5

I use this TextMode="password" autocomplete="new-password" and in in page load in aspx txtPassword.Attributes.Add("value", '');

5

Google Chrome ignores the autocomplete="off" attribute for certain inputs, including password inputs and common inputs detected by name.

For example, if you have an input with name address, then Chrome will provide autofill suggestions from addresses entered on other sites, even if you tell it not to:

<input type="string" name="address" autocomplete="off">

If you don't want Chrome to do that, then you can rename or namespace the form field's name:

<input type="string" name="mysite_addr" autocomplete="off">

If you don't mind autocompleting values which were previously entered on your site, then you can leave autocomplete enabled. Namespacing the field name should be enough to prevent values remembered from other sites from appearing.

<input type="string" name="mysite_addr" autocomplete="on">
5
<script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">
    $(document).ready(function () {
        try {
            $("input[type='text']").each(
                function(){
                   $(this).attr("autocomplete", "off");
                });
        }
        catch (e) {
        }
    });
</script>
2
  • How is this any different than setting it to autocomplete=off in html, which doesn't work these days? – Andrew Nov 8 '18 at 16:29
  • An explanation would be in order. E.g., what is the idea/gist? What was it tested on (including version information) and under what conditions? – Peter Mortensen Apr 8 at 23:46
5

This is what we called autocomplete of a textbox.

Enter image description here

We can disable autocomplete of a Textbox in two ways:

  1. By Browser Label

  2. By Code

    To disable in a browser, go to the setting

To disable in the browser, go to the setting

Go to Advanced Settings and uncheck the checkbox and then Restore.

Go to Advanced Settings and uncheck the checkbox and then Restore.

If you want to disable in coding label you can do as follows -

Using AutoCompleteType="Disabled":

<asp:TextBox runat="server" ID="txt_userid" AutoCompleteType="Disabled"></asp:TextBox>

By Setting Form autocomplete="off":

<asp:TextBox runat="server" ID="txt_userid" autocomplete="off"></asp:TextBox>

By Setting Form autocomplete="off":

<form id="form1" runat="server" autocomplete="off">
    // Your content
</form>

By using code in the .cs page:

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if(!Page.IsPostBack)
    {
        txt_userid.Attributes.Add("autocomplete", "off");
    }
}

By using jQuery

<head runat="server">
    <title></title>

    <script src="Scripts/jquery-1.6.4.min.js"></script>

    <script type="text/javascript">
        $(document).ready(function () {
            $('#txt_userid').attr('autocomplete', 'off');
        });
    </script>
0
5

The answer dsuess posted with the readonly was very clever and worked.

But as I am using Bootstrap, the readonly input field was - until focused - marked with grey background. While the document loads, you can trick the browser by simply locking and unlocking the input.

So I had an idea to implement this into a jQuery solution:

jQuery(document).ready(function () {
    $("input").attr('readonly', true);
    $("input").removeAttr('readonly');
});
0
5

My problem was mostly autofill with Chrome, but I think this is probably more problematic than autocomplete.

Trick: using a timer to reset the form and set the password fields to blank. The 100 ms duration seems to be the minimum for it to work.

$(document).ready(function() {
    setTimeout(function() {
        var $form = $('#formId');
        $form[0].reset();
        $form.find('INPUT[type=password]').val('');
    }, 100);
});
1
  • Doesnt help with default values, but it is an idea, as you could track & replace the values with the ones that were there originally I suppose. – Andrew Nov 8 '18 at 16:27
4

It doesn't seem to be possible to achieve this without using a combination client side and server side code.

In order to make sure that the user must fill in the form every time without autocomplete I use the following techniques:

  1. Generate the form field names on the server and use hidden input fields to store those names, so that when submitted to the server the server side code can use the generated names to access the field values. This is to stop the user from having the option to auto populate the fields.

  2. Place three instances of each form field on the form and hide the first and last fields of each set using css and then disable them after page load using javascript. This is to prevent the browser from filling in the fields automatically.

Here is a fiddle that demonstrates the javascript, css and html as described in #2 https://jsfiddle.net/xnbxbpv4/

javascript:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $(".disable-input").attr("disabled", "disabled");
});

css:

.disable-input {
  display: none;
}

html:

<form>
<input type="email" name="username" placeholder="username" class="disable-input">
<input type="email" name="username" placeholder="username">
<input type="email" name="username" placeholder="username" class="disable-input">
<br>
<input type="password" name="password" placeholder="password" class="disable-input">
<input type="password" name="password" placeholder="password">
<input type="password" name="password" placeholder="password" class="disable-input">
<br>
<input type="submit" value="submit">
</form>

Here is a rough example of what the server code using asp.net with razor would be to facilitate #1

model:

public class FormModel
{
    public string Username { get; set; }
    public string Password { get; set; }
}

controller:

public class FormController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Form()
    {
        var m = new FormModel();

        m.Username = "F" + Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
        m.Password = "F" + Guid.NewGuid().ToString();

        return View(m);
    }

    public ActionResult Form(FormModel m)
    {
        var u = Request.Form[m.Username];
        var p = Request.Form[m.Password];

        // todo: do something with the form values

        ...

        return View(m);
    }
}

view:

@model FormModel

@using (Html.BeginForm("Form", "Form"))
{
    @Html.HiddenFor(m => m.UserName)
    @Html.HiddenFor(m => m.Password)

    <input type="email" name="@Model.Username" placeholder="username" class="disable-input">
    <input type="email" name="@Model.Username" placeholder="username">
    <input type="email" name="@Model.Username" placeholder="username" class="disable-input">
    <br>
    <input type="password" name="@Model.Password" placeholder="password" class="disable-input">
    <input type="password" name="@Model.Password" placeholder="password">
    <input type="password" name="@Model.Password" placeholder="password" class="disable-input">
    <br>
    <input type="submit" value="submit">
}
4

I tried almost all the answer but the new version of Chrome is smart; if you write

autocomplete="randomstring" or autocomplete="rutjfkde"

it automatically converts it to

autocomplete="off"

when input control receives the focus.

So, I did it using jQuery, my solution is as follows.

$("input[type=text], input[type=number], input[type=email], input[type=password]").focus(function (e) {
    $(this).attr("autocomplete", "new-password");
})

This is the easiest and will do the trick for any number of controls you have on the form.

4

It could be important to know that Firefox (I think only Firefox) uses a value called ismxfilled that basically forces autocomplete.

ismxfilled="0" for OFF

or

ismxfilled="1" for ON

3

Try this :

<input type='text' autocomplete='off' />
3

To solve this problem, I have used some CSS tricks and the following works for me.

input {
    text-security:disc;
    -webkit-text-security:disc;
    -mox-text-security:disc;
}

Please read this article for further detail.

3

To prevent browser auto fill with the user's saved site login credentials, place a text and password input field at the top of the form with non empty values and style "position: absolute; top: -999px; left:-999px" set to hide the fields.

<form>
  <input type="text" name="username_X" value="-" tabindex="-1" aria-hidden="true" style="position: absolute; top: -999px; left:-999px" />
  <input type="password" name="password_X" value="-" tabindex="-1" aria-hidden="true" style="position: absolute; top: -999px; left:-999px" />
  <!-- Place the form elements below here. -->
</form>

It is important that a text field precede the password field. Otherwise the auto fill may not be prevented in some cases.

It is important that the value of both the text and password fields not be empty, to prevent default values from being overwritten in some cases.

It is important that these two fields are before the "real" password type field(s) in the form.

For newer browsers that are html 5.3 compliant the autocomplete attribute value "new-password" should work.

<form>
  <input type="text" name="username" value="" />
  <input type="password" name="password" value="" autocomplete="new-password" />
</form>

A combination of the two methods can be used to support both older and newer browsers.

<form>
  <div style="display:none">
    <input type="text" readonly tabindex="-1" />
    <input type="password" readonly tabindex="-1" />
  </div>
  <!-- Place the form elements below here. -->
  <input type="text" name="username" value="" />
  <input type="password" name="password" value="" autocomplete="new-password" />
</form>
3

If you want to prevent the common browser plug-in LastPass from auto-filling a field as well, you can add the attribute data-lpignore="true" added to the other suggestions on this thread. Note that this doesn't only apply to password fields.

<input type="text" autocomplete="false" data-lpignore="true" />

I was trying to do this same thing a while back, and was stumped because none of the suggestions I found worked for me. Turned out it was LastPass.

3

Most of the answers didn't help as the browser was simply ignoring them. (Some of them were not cross-browser compatible). The fix that worked for me is:

<form autocomplete="off">
    <input type="text" autocomplete="new-password" />
    <input type="password" autocomplete="new-password" />
</form>

I set autofill="off" on the form tag and autofill="new-password" wherever the autofill was not necessary.

3

As of Dec 2019:

Before answering this question let me say, I tried almost all the answers here on SO and from different forums but couldn't find a solution that works for all modern browsers and IE11.

So here is the solution I found, and I believe it's not yet discussed or mentioned in this post.

According to Mozilla Dev Network(MDN) post about how to turn off form autocomplete

By default, browsers remember information that the user submits through fields on websites. This enables the browser to offer autocompletion (that is, suggest possible completions for fields that the user has started typing in) or autofill (that is, pre-populate certain fields upon load)

On same article they discussed the usage of autocmplete property and its limitation. As we know, not all browsers honor this attribute as we desire.

Solution

So at the end of the article they shared a solution that works for all browsers including IE11+Edge. It is basically a jQuery plugin that do the trick. Here is the link to jQuery plugin and how it works.

Code snippet:

$(document).ready(function () {        
    $('#frmLogin').disableAutoFill({
        passwordField: '.password'
    });
});

Point to notice in HTML is that password field is of type text and password class is applied to identify that field:

<input id="Password" name="Password" type="text" class="form-control password">

Hope this would help someone.

3

There are many answers but most of them are hacks or some kind of workaround.

There are three cases here.

Case I: If this is your standard login form. Turning it off by any means is probably bad. Think hard if you really need to do it. Users are accustomed to browsers remembering and storing the passwords. You shouldn't change that standard behaviour in most cases.

In case you still want to do it, see Case III

Case II: When this is not your regular login form but name or id attribute of inputs is not "like" email, login, username, user_name, password.

Use

<input type="text" name="yoda" autocomplete="off">

Case III: When this is not your regular login form but name or id attribute of inputs is "like" email, login, username, user_name, password.

For example: login, abc_login, password, some_password, password_field.

All browsers come with password management features offering to remember them OR suggesting stronger passwords. That's how they do it.

However, suppose you are an admin of a site and can create users and set their passwords. In this case you wouldn't want browsers to offer these features.

In such cases, autocomplete="off" will not work. Use autocomplete="new-password"

<input type="text" name="yoda" autocomplete="new-password">

Helpful Link:

  1. https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/Security/Securing_your_site/Turning_off_form_autocompletion
3

In Chrome, for password type inputs, the autocomplete="new-password" is the only thing working for me.

3

Safari does not change its mind about autocomplete if you set autocomplete="off" dynamically from JavaScript. However, it would respect if you do that on per-field basis.

$(':input', $formElement).attr('autocomplete', 'off');
3

The idea is to create an invisible field with the same name before the original one. That will make the browser auto populate the hidden field.

I use the following jQuery snippet:

// Prevent input autocomplete
$.fn.preventAutocomplete = function() {
    this.each(function () {
        var $el = $(this);
        $el
            .clone(false, false) // Make a copy (except events)
            .insertBefore($el)   // Place it before original field
            .prop('id', '')      // Prevent ID duplicates
            .hide()              // Make it invisible for user
        ;
    });
};

And then just $('#login-form input').preventAutocomplete();

1
  • @mickmackusa thank you for the comment, I've just added more explanation – Oleg Aug 28 '20 at 9:18
2

A workaround is not to insert the password field into the DOM before the user wants to change the password. This may be applicable in certain cases:

In our system we have a password field which in an admin page, so we must avoid inadvertently setting other users' passwords. The form has an extra checkbox that will toggle the password field visibility for this reason.

So in this case, autofill from a password manager becomes a double problem, because the input won't even be visible to the user.

The solution was to have the checkbox trigger whether the password field is inserted in the DOM, not just its visibility.

Pseudo implementation for AngularJS:

<input type="checkbox" ng-model="createPassword">
<input ng-if="changePassword" type="password">
2

You can use autocomplete = off in input controls to avoid auto completion

For example:

<input type=text name="test" autocomplete="off" />

if the above code doesn't works then try to add those attributes also

autocapitalize="off" autocomplete="off"

or

Change input type attribute to type="search". Google doesn't apply auto-fill to inputs with a type of search.

2

I wanted something that took the field management completely out of the browser's hands, so to speak. In this example, there's a single standard text input field to capture a password — no email, user name etc...

<input id='input_password' type='text' autocomplete='off' autofocus>

There's a variable named "input", set to be an empty string...

var input = "";

The field events are monitored by JQuery...

  1. On focus, the field content and the associated "input" variable are always cleared.
  2. On keypress, any alphanumeric character, as well as some defined symbols, are appended to the "input" variable, and the field input is replaced with a bullet character. Additionally, when the Enter key is pressed, the typed characters (stored in the "input" variable) are sent to the server via Ajax. (See "Server Details" below.)
  3. On keyup, the Home, End, and Arrow keys cause the "input" variable and field values to be flushed. (I could have gotten fancy with arrow navigation and the focus event, and used .selectionStart to figure out where the user had clicked or was navigating, but it's not worth the effort for a password field.) Additionally, pressing the Backspace key truncates both the variable and field content accordingly.

$("#input_password").off().on("focus", function(event) {
    $(this).val("");
    input = "";

}).on("keypress", function(event) {
    event.preventDefault();

    if (event.key !== "Enter" && event.key.match(/^[0-9a-z!@#\$%&*-_]/)) {
        $(this).val( $(this).val() + "•" );
        input += event.key;
    }
    else if (event.key == "Enter") {
        var params = {};
        params.password = input;

        $.post(SERVER_URL, params, function(data, status, ajax) {
            location.reload();
        });
    }

}).on("keyup", function(event) {
    var navigationKeys = ["Home", "End", "ArrowLeft", "ArrowRight", "ArrowUp", "ArrowDown"];
    if ($.inArray(event.key, navigationKeys) > -1) {
        event.preventDefault();
        $(this).val("");
        input = "";
    }
    else if (event.key == "Backspace") {
        var length = $(this).val().length - 1 > 0 ? $(this).val().length : 0;
        input = input.substring(0, length);
    }
});

Front-End Summary

In essence, this gives the browser nothing useful to capture. Even if it overrides the autocomplete setting, and/or presents a dropdown with previously entered values, all it has is bullets stored for the field value.


Server Details (optional reading)

As shown above, Javascript executes location.reload() as soon as the server returns a JSON response. (This logon technique is for access to a restricted administration tool. Some of the overkill, related to the cookie content, could be skipped for a more generalized implementation.) Here are the details:

  • When a user navigates to the site, the server looks for a legitimate cookie.
  • If there is no cookie, the logon page is presented. When the user enters a password and it is sent via Ajax, the server confirms the password and also checks to see if the user's IP is in an Authorized IP list.
  • If either the password or IP are not recognized, the server doesn't generate a cookie, so when the page reloads, the user sees the same logon page.
  • If both the password and IP are recognized, the server generates a cookie that has a ten-minute life span, and it also stores two scrambled values that correspond with the time-frame and IP.
  • When the page reloads, the server finds the cookie and verifies that the scrambled values are correct (i.e., that the time-frame corresponds with the cookie's date and that the IP is the same).
  • The process of authenticating and updating the cookie is repeated every time the user interacts with the server, whether they are logging in, displaying data, or updating a record.
  • If at all times the cookie's values are correct, the server presents the full website (if the user is logging in) or fulfills whatever display or update request was submitted.
  • If at any time the cookie's values are not correct, the server removes the current cookie which then, upon reload, causes the logon page to be re-displayed.
2

Easy Hack

Make input read-only

<input type="text" name="name" readonly="readonly">

Remove read-only after timeout

$(function() {
        setTimeout(function() {
            $('input[name="name"]').prop('readonly', false);
        }, 50);
    });
2

unfortunately this option was removed in most browsers, so it is not possible to disable the password hint, until today I did not find a good solution to work around this problem, what we have left now is to hope that one day this option will come back.

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