74

Apparently on my Windows 8 laptop with HotSpot JDK 1.7.0_45 (with all compiler/VM options set to default), the below loop

final int n = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
int i = 0;
while (++i < n) {
}

is at least 2 orders of magnitude faster (~10 ms vs. ~5000 ms) than:

final int n = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
int i = 0;
while (i++ < n) {
}

I happened to notice this problem while writing a loop to evaluate another irrelevant performance issue. And the difference between ++i < n and i++ < n was huge enough to significantly influence the result.

If we look at the bytecode, the loop body of the faster version is:

iinc
iload
ldc
if_icmplt

And for the slower version:

iload
iinc
ldc
if_icmplt

So for ++i < n, it first increments local variable i by 1 and then push it onto the operand stack while i++ < n does those 2 steps in reverse order. But that doesn't seem to explain why the former is much faster. Is there any temp copy involved in the latter case? Or is it something beyond the bytecode (VM implementation, hardware, etc.) that should be responsible for the performance difference?

I've read some other discussion regarding ++i and i++ (not exhaustively though), but didn't find any answer that is Java-specific and directly related to the case where ++i or i++ is involved in a value comparison.

  • 23
    10 ms is hardly long enough for a benchmark - let alone a Java benchmark where you have JVM warmup effects. Can you post your exact test code? Also, try reversing the order of the benchmarks. – Mysticial Aug 15 '14 at 7:32
  • 3
    As Mysticial said, java needs warmup time. This is for the Just In Time (JIT) compiler to do its work. If you place your code in a function and call it several times before doing your measurements you might get different results. – Thirler Aug 15 '14 at 7:34
  • 12
    @CaptainCodeman in such a general form, that statement is just plain nonsense. There's much more to performance than (flawed) micro benchmarks. We switched to Java for a quite large project from C++ and gained an order of magnitude in performance. It depends on the problem you are trying to solve, the resources you have, and much more. Always chose the language that best suits your problem, and the personnel you have at hand (among other factors). – Axel Aug 15 '14 at 12:33
  • 4
    @Axel I'm curious, for what sort of application did switching from C++ to Java give you an order of magnitude performance increase? – CaptainCodeman Aug 16 '14 at 9:44
  • 7
    @Axel No compiled programming language is an order of magnitude faster than another; so the more likely scenario is that you had terrible C++ programmers or were using a very slow library. – CaptainCodeman Aug 16 '14 at 18:41
118

As others have pointed out, the test is flawed in many ways.

You did not tell us exactly how you did this test. However, I tried to implement a "naive" test (no offense) like this:

class PrePostIncrement
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        for (int j=0; j<3; j++)
        {
            for (int i=0; i<5; i++)
            {
                long before = System.nanoTime();
                runPreIncrement();
                long after = System.nanoTime();
                System.out.println("pre  : "+(after-before)/1e6);
            }
            for (int i=0; i<5; i++)
            {
                long before = System.nanoTime();
                runPostIncrement();
                long after = System.nanoTime();
                System.out.println("post : "+(after-before)/1e6);
            }
        }
    }

    private static void runPreIncrement()
    {
        final int n = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
        int i = 0;
        while (++i < n) {}
    }

    private static void runPostIncrement()
    {
        final int n = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
        int i = 0;
        while (i++ < n) {}
    }
}

When running this with default settings, there seems to be a small difference. But the real flaw of the benchmark becomes obvious when you run this with the -server flag. The results in my case then are along something like

...
pre  : 6.96E-4
pre  : 6.96E-4
pre  : 0.001044
pre  : 3.48E-4
pre  : 3.48E-4
post : 1279.734543
post : 1295.989086
post : 1284.654267
post : 1282.349093
post : 1275.204583

Obviously, the pre-increment version has been completely optimized away. The reason is rather simple: The result is not used. It does not matter at all whether the loop is executed or not, so the JIT simply removes it.

This is confirmed by a look at the hotspot disassembly: The pre-increment version results in this code:

[Entry Point]
[Verified Entry Point]
[Constants]
  # {method} {0x0000000055060500} &apos;runPreIncrement&apos; &apos;()V&apos; in &apos;PrePostIncrement&apos;
  #           [sp+0x20]  (sp of caller)
  0x000000000286fd80: sub    $0x18,%rsp
  0x000000000286fd87: mov    %rbp,0x10(%rsp)    ;*synchronization entry
                                                ; - PrePostIncrement::runPreIncrement@-1 (line 28)

  0x000000000286fd8c: add    $0x10,%rsp
  0x000000000286fd90: pop    %rbp
  0x000000000286fd91: test   %eax,-0x243fd97(%rip)        # 0x0000000000430000
                                                ;   {poll_return}
  0x000000000286fd97: retq   
  0x000000000286fd98: hlt    
  0x000000000286fd99: hlt    
  0x000000000286fd9a: hlt    
  0x000000000286fd9b: hlt    
  0x000000000286fd9c: hlt    
  0x000000000286fd9d: hlt    
  0x000000000286fd9e: hlt    
  0x000000000286fd9f: hlt    

The post-increment version results in this code:

[Entry Point]
[Verified Entry Point]
[Constants]
  # {method} {0x00000000550605b8} &apos;runPostIncrement&apos; &apos;()V&apos; in &apos;PrePostIncrement&apos;
  #           [sp+0x20]  (sp of caller)
  0x000000000286d0c0: sub    $0x18,%rsp
  0x000000000286d0c7: mov    %rbp,0x10(%rsp)    ;*synchronization entry
                                                ; - PrePostIncrement::runPostIncrement@-1 (line 35)

  0x000000000286d0cc: mov    $0x1,%r11d
  0x000000000286d0d2: jmp    0x000000000286d0e3
  0x000000000286d0d4: nopl   0x0(%rax,%rax,1)
  0x000000000286d0dc: data32 data32 xchg %ax,%ax
  0x000000000286d0e0: inc    %r11d              ; OopMap{off=35}
                                                ;*goto
                                                ; - PrePostIncrement::runPostIncrement@11 (line 36)

  0x000000000286d0e3: test   %eax,-0x243d0e9(%rip)        # 0x0000000000430000
                                                ;*goto
                                                ; - PrePostIncrement::runPostIncrement@11 (line 36)
                                                ;   {poll}
  0x000000000286d0e9: cmp    $0x7fffffff,%r11d
  0x000000000286d0f0: jl     0x000000000286d0e0  ;*if_icmpge
                                                ; - PrePostIncrement::runPostIncrement@8 (line 36)

  0x000000000286d0f2: add    $0x10,%rsp
  0x000000000286d0f6: pop    %rbp
  0x000000000286d0f7: test   %eax,-0x243d0fd(%rip)        # 0x0000000000430000
                                                ;   {poll_return}
  0x000000000286d0fd: retq   
  0x000000000286d0fe: hlt    
  0x000000000286d0ff: hlt    

It's not entirely clear for me why it seemingly does not remove the post-increment version. (In fact, I consider asking this as a separate question). But at least, this explains why you might see differences with an "order of magnitude"...


EDIT: Interestingly, when changing the upper limit of the loop from Integer.MAX_VALUE to Integer.MAX_VALUE-1, then both versions are optimized away and require "zero" time. Somehow this limit (which still appears as 0x7fffffff in the assembly) prevents the optimization. Presumably, this has something to do with the comparison being mapped to a (singed!) cmp instruction, but I can not give a profound reason beyond that. The JIT works in mysterious ways...

  • 2
    I'm not a java guy but I do take a passing, hobby interest in the mechanics of compilers. If you (or anyone) happens to ask your follow-up question on a separate post, please post a link. Thank you! – RLH Aug 15 '14 at 11:06
  • 26
    Actually that was the first thing which came into my mind: when while (i++ < Integer.MAX_VALUE) exits the loop, an overflow has already happened to i. Proving the correctness of a code transformation is much harder when overflow might occur and after all, loops with overflows are not the common case so why should hotspot bother optimizing them… – Holger Aug 15 '14 at 11:39
  • 5
    @RLH I posted a follow-up question at stackoverflow.com/questions/25326377/… – Marco13 Aug 15 '14 at 12:27
  • @Holger: Yeah, that sounds like a way to avoid having trouble with the optimizations violating safety constraints - it doesn't occur commonly, so it's not worth it checking for all the things that could go wrong (e.g. buffer overflows). – Luaan Aug 15 '14 at 14:45
  • @Holger but how do you explain that if the limit is reduced from Integer.MAX_VALUE to Integer.MAX_VALUE-1 both are optimized, So with i++ case overflow still happens but optimized at the same time!!! – Sumit Kumar Saha Aug 20 '14 at 19:15
19

The difference between ++i and i++ is that ++i effectively increments the variable and 'returns' that new value. i++ on the other hand effectively creates a temp variable to hold the current value in i, then increments the variable 'returning' the temp variable's value. This is where the extra overhead is coming from.

// i++ evaluates to something like this
// Imagine though that somehow i was passed by reference
int temp = i;
i = i + 1;
return temp;

// ++i evaluates to
i = i + 1;
return i;

In your case it appears that the increment won't be optimized by the JVM because you are using the result in an expression. The JVM can on the other hand optimize a loop like this.

for( int i = 0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; i++ ) {}

This is because the result of i++ is never used. In a loop like this you should be able to use both ++i and i++ with the same performance as if you used ++i.

  • It might be a bit clearer when the hotspot compiler would be mentioned explicitly. – Joop Eggen Aug 15 '14 at 7:34
  • 10
    As the OP mentioned, both versions result in the same number of byte code instructions. Where is the overhead you are talking about there? And what are the JVM optimizations you talk about that are possible for the ++i version that are not possible for the other? – arne.b Aug 15 '14 at 8:05
  • Wondering how iload works... Does it actually copy the variable from the local variable table to the operand stack? If yes, for i++, i is first pushed (copied) to the operand stack and iinc increments the original i in the local variable table. ++i does exactly the same in reverse order. In both cases, there is no additional temp variable. But I could be completely wrong :) – sikan Aug 15 '14 at 8:09
  • If you look at Eugene's answer with his added benchmarks you see that the difference is minimal if none at all. The JVM can optimize, most of the time, a i++ to a ++i. In that it will remove the temp variable and just do an increment on the variable. My only guess is that by using i++ in the comparison, is that when the bytecode is compiled to machine code, the JVM is allocating an additional register for use with the loop. – Smith_61 Aug 15 '14 at 8:10
18

EDIT 2

You should really look here:

http://hg.openjdk.java.net/code-tools/jmh/file/f90aef7f1d2c/jmh-samples/src/main/java/org/openjdk/jmh/samples/JMHSample_11_Loops.java

EDIT The more I think about it, I realise that this test is somehow wrong, the loop will get seriously optimized by the JVM.

I think that you should just drop the @Param and let n=2.

This way you will test the performance of the while itself. The results I get in this case :

o.m.t.WhileTest.testFirst      avgt         5        0.787        0.086    ns/op
o.m.t.WhileTest.testSecond     avgt         5        0.782        0.087    ns/op

The is almost no difference

The very first question you should ask yourself is how you test and measure this. This is micro-benchmarking and in Java this is an art, and almost always a simple user (like me) will get the results wrong. You should rely on a benchmark test and very good tool for that. I used JMH to test this:

    @Measurement(iterations=5, time=1, timeUnit=TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS)
@Fork(1)
@Warmup(iterations=5, time=1, timeUnit=TimeUnit.SECONDS)
@OutputTimeUnit(TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS)
@BenchmarkMode(Mode.AverageTime)
@State(Scope.Benchmark)
public class WhileTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Options opt = new OptionsBuilder()
            .include(".*" + WhileTest.class.getSimpleName() + ".*")
            .threads(1)
            .build();

        new Runner(opt).run();
    }


    @Param({"100", "10000", "100000", "1000000"})
    private int n;

    /*
    @State(Scope.Benchmark)
    public static class HOLDER_I {
        int x;
    }
    */


    @Benchmark
    public int testFirst(){
        int i = 0;
        while (++i < n) {
        }
        return i;
    }

    @Benchmark
    public int testSecond(){
        int i = 0;
        while (i++ < n) {
        }
        return i;
    }
}

Someone way more experienced in JMH might correct this results (I really hope so!, since I am not that versatile in JMH yet), but the results show that the difference is pretty darn small:

Benchmark                        (n)   Mode   Samples        Score  Score error    Units
o.m.t.WhileTest.testFirst        100   avgt         5        1.271        0.096    ns/op
o.m.t.WhileTest.testFirst      10000   avgt         5        1.319        0.125    ns/op
o.m.t.WhileTest.testFirst     100000   avgt         5        1.327        0.241    ns/op
o.m.t.WhileTest.testFirst    1000000   avgt         5        1.311        0.136    ns/op
o.m.t.WhileTest.testSecond       100   avgt         5        1.450        0.525    ns/op
o.m.t.WhileTest.testSecond     10000   avgt         5        1.563        0.479    ns/op
o.m.t.WhileTest.testSecond    100000   avgt         5        1.418        0.428    ns/op
o.m.t.WhileTest.testSecond   1000000   avgt         5        1.344        0.120    ns/op

The Score field is the one you are interested in.

  • From what I can tell, and correct me if I am wrong, the JVM doesn't appear to be optimizing the i++ into ++i when the result is used. Or is it just because i++ loops an extra time? – Smith_61 Aug 15 '14 at 7:56
0

probably this test is not enough to take conclusions but I would say if this is the case, the JVM can optimize this expression by changing i++ to ++i since the stored value of i++ (pre value) is never used in this loop.

-3

I suggest you should (whenever possible) always use ++c rather than c++ as the former will never be slower since, conceptually, a deep copy of c has to be taken in the latter case in order to return the previous value.

Indeed many optimisers will optimise away an unnecessary deep copy but they can't easily do that if you're making use of the expression value. And you're doing just that in your case.

Many folk disagree though: they see it as as a micro-optimisation.

  • 6
    This may be true in the world of non-trivial C++ iterators, but not for primitive types... – Mysticial Aug 15 '14 at 7:37
  • 3
    @Bathsheba I agree that you should understand your compiler and what kind of optimizations it will do for you. In limited cases you will have to do those kinds of optimizations yourself. If you are using a compiler that will not do it for you, you will probably know. As most of these compilers are for embedded systems or have a smaller population of users. – Smith_61 Aug 15 '14 at 7:51
  • 4
    I am on @Bathsheba 's side. I do know that in 99% of case (especially in Java) it makes no difference in writing ++i and i++. However I'd rather make this a habit to write ++i because there are non-trivial case that it will makes a difference (esp in C++ etc). Given that ++i is nothing harder to read than i++, why not write a potentially safer form? Just like we write things like if (CONSTANT == var), and if (CONSTANT.equals(var)) – Adrian Shum Aug 15 '14 at 7:54
  • 5
    Downvote for misinformation. It is not possible to "deep copy" anything that it is possible to use the "++" operators on in Java, and stating that optimizers cannot optimize away the operation when it is used in a comparison is also misinformation. – Score_Under Aug 15 '14 at 13:41
  • 4
    In the situation where the result of an incrementing operator is used, one should use whichever operator better fits the semantics of what one is doing, since any performance difference may be offset by code changes elsewhere resulting from the choice. If the result of the operator isn't used, I prefer post-operators since it's more consistent with the noun-verb pattern used elsewhere. – supercat Aug 15 '14 at 15:45

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