If I have an array in Swift, and try to access an index that is out of bounds, there is an unsurprising runtime error:

var str = ["Apple", "Banana", "Coconut"]

str[0] // "Apple"
str[3] // EXC_BAD_INSTRUCTION

However, I would have thought with all the optional chaining and safety that Swift brings, it would be trivial to do something like:

let theIndex = 3
if let nonexistent = str[theIndex] { // Bounds check + Lookup
    print(nonexistent)
    ...do other things with nonexistent...
}

Instead of:

let theIndex = 3
if (theIndex < str.count) {         // Bounds check
    let nonexistent = str[theIndex] // Lookup
    print(nonexistent)   
    ...do other things with nonexistent... 
}

But this is not the case - I have to use the ol' if statement to check and ensure the index is less than str.count.

I tried adding my own subscript() implementation, but I'm not sure how to pass the call to the original implementation, or to access the items (index-based) without using subscript notation:

extension Array {
    subscript(var index: Int) -> AnyObject? {
        if index >= self.count {
            NSLog("Womp!")
            return nil
        }
        return ... // What?
    }
}
  • 2
    I realize this is slightly OT, but I also feel it would be nice if Swift had clear syntax for performing any sort of bounds check, including lists. We already have a suitable keyword for this, in. So for instance, if X in (1,2,7)... or if X in myArray – Maury Markowitz Oct 24 '16 at 13:49

13 Answers 13

up vote 489 down vote accepted

Alex's answer has good advice and solution for the question, however I've happened to stumble on a nicer way of implementing this functionality:

Swift 3.2 and newer

extension Collection {

    /// Returns the element at the specified index iff it is within bounds, otherwise nil.
    subscript (safe index: Index) -> Element? {
        return indices.contains(index) ? self[index] : nil
    }
}

Swift 3.0 and 3.1

extension Collection where Indices.Iterator.Element == Index {

    /// Returns the element at the specified index iff it is within bounds, otherwise nil.
    subscript (safe index: Index) -> Generator.Element? {
        return indices.contains(index) ? self[index] : nil
    }
}

Credit to Hamish for coming up with the solution for Swift 3.

Swift 2

extension CollectionType {

    /// Returns the element at the specified index iff it is within bounds, otherwise nil.
    subscript (safe index: Index) -> Generator.Element? {
        return indices.contains(index) ? self[index] : nil
    }
}

Example

let array = [1, 2, 3]

for index in -20...20 {
    if let item = array[safe: index] {
        print(item)
    }
}
  • 35
    I think this definitely deserves attention - nice work. I like the included safe: parameter name to ensure the difference. – Craig Otis Jun 2 '15 at 11:25
  • 10
    As of Swift 2 (Xcode 7) this needs a little tweak: return self.indices ~= index ? self[index] : nil; – Tim Jun 15 '15 at 5:34
  • 2
    The reason is subjective. I read my implementation as "array's indices include index". It's concise, and, to me, seems simpler than a bounds check made of comparisons. I also like to play with new API. You can freely replace my implementation with yours, however you may also want to add a check for negative indexes to be completely safe. – Nikita Kukushkin Nov 15 '15 at 20:24
  • 3
    Hey, I've updated the answer for Swift 3. I'll be stuck with Swift 2 for a while longer, so if anything breaks, feel free to point it out. – Nikita Kukushkin Jul 18 '16 at 18:54
  • 5
    Regarding the Swift 3 version: possibly a corner-case-only-prompt, but a prompt nonetheless: there are cases where the "safe" subscript version above isn't safe (whereas the Swift 2 version was): for Collection types where the Indices are not contiguous. E.g. for Set instances, if we were to access a set element by index (SetIndex<Element>), we can run into runtime exceptions for indices that are >= startIndex and < endIndex, in which case the safe subscript fails (see e.g. this contrived example). – dfri Oct 30 '16 at 18:57

If you really want this behavior, it smells like you want a Dictionary instead of an Array. Dictionaries return nil when accessing missing keys, which makes sense because it's much harder to know if a key is present in a dictionary since those keys can be anything, where in an array the key must in a range of: 0 to count. And it's incredibly common to iterate over this range, where you can be absolutely sure have a real value on each iteration of a loop.

I think the reason it doesn't work this way is a design choice made by the Swift developers. Take your example:

var fruits: [String] = ["Apple", "Banana", "Coconut"]
var str: String = "I ate a \( fruits[0] )"

If you already know the index exists, as you do in most cases where you use an array, this code is great. However, if accessing a subscript could possibly return nil then you have changed to return type of Array's subscript method to be an optional. This changes your code to:

var fruits: [String] = ["Apple", "Banana", "Coconut"]
var str: String = "I ate a \( fruits[0]! )"
//                                     ^ Added

Which means you would need to unwrap an optional every time you iterated through an array, or did anything else with a known index, just because rarely you might access an out of bounds index. The Swift designers opted for less unwrapping of optionals, at the expense of a runtime exception when accessing out of bounds indexes. And a crash is preferable to a logic error caused by a nil you didn't expect in your data somewhere.

And I agree with them. So you won't be changing the default Array implementation because you would break all the code that expects a non-optional values from arrays.

Instead, you could subclass Array, and override subscript to return an optional. Or, more practically, you could extend Array with a non-subscript method that does this.

extension Array {

    // Safely lookup an index that might be out of bounds,
    // returning nil if it does not exist
    func get(index: Int) -> T? {
        if 0 <= index && index < count {
            return self[index]
        } else {
            return nil
        }
    }
}

var fruits: [String] = ["Apple", "Banana", "Coconut"]
if let fruit = fruits.get(1) {
    print("I ate a \( fruit )")
    // I ate a Banana
}

if let fruit = fruits.get(3) {
    print("I ate a \( fruit )")
    // never runs, get returned nil
}

Swift 3 Update

func get(index: Int) ->T? needs to be replaced by func get(index: Int) ->Element?

  • 1
    +1 (and the accept) for mentioning the issue with changing the return type of subscript() to an optional - this was the primary roadblock faced in overriding the default behavior. (I couldn't actually get it to work at all.) I was avoiding writing a get() extension method, which is the obvious choice in other scenarios (Obj-C categories, anyone?) but get( isn't much bigger than [, and makes it clear that the behavior may differ from what other developers may expect out of the Swift subscript operator. Thank you! – Craig Otis Aug 15 '14 at 17:27
  • 2
    To make it even shorter, I use at() ;) Thanks! – hyouuu Jun 2 '15 at 7:45
  • 5
    As of Swift 2.0 T has been renamed to Element. Just a friendly reminder :) – Stas Zhukovskiy Dec 7 '15 at 10:56
  • 1
    To add onto this discussion, another reason why bounds checking isn't baked into Swift to return an optional is because returning nil instead of causing an exception from an out-of-bounds index would be ambiguous. Since e.g. Array<String?> could also return nil as a valid member of the collection, you wouldn't be able to differentiate between those two cases. If you have your own collection type that you know can never return a nil value, aka it's contextual to the application, then you could extend Swift for safe bounds checking as answered in this post. – Aaron Jun 13 '17 at 21:30

Valid in Swift 2

Even though this has been answered plenty of times already, I'd like to present an answer more in line in where the fashion of Swift programming is going, which in Crusty's words¹ is: "Think protocols first"

• What do we want to do?
- Get an Element of an Array given an Index only when it's safe, and nil otherwise
• What should this functionality base it's implementation on?
- Array subscripting
• Where does it get this feature from?
- Its definition of struct Array in the Swift module has it
• Nothing more generic/abstract?
- It adopts protocol CollectionType which ensures it as well
• Nothing more generic/abstract?
- It adopts protocol Indexable as well...
• Yup, sounds like the best we can do. Can we then extend it to have this feature we want?
- But we have very limited types (no Int) and properties (no count) to work with now!
• It will be enough. Swift's stdlib is done pretty well ;)

extension Indexable {
    public subscript(safe safeIndex: Index) -> _Element? {
        return safeIndex.distanceTo(endIndex) > 0 ? self[safeIndex] : nil
    }
}

¹: not true, but it gives the idea

  • 1
    As a Swift newbie I don't understand this answer. What does the code at the end represent? Is that a solution, and if so, how do I actually use it? – Thomas Tempelmann May 17 '17 at 17:28
  • 2
    Sorry, this answer isn't valid anymore for Swift 3, but the process certainly is. The only difference is that now you should stop at Collection probably :) – DeFrenZ May 17 '17 at 18:30
  • Because arrays may store nil values, it does not make sense to return a nil if an array[index] call is out of bounds.
  • Because we do not know how a user would like to handle out of bounds problems, it does not make sense to use custom operators.
  • In contrast, use traditional control flow for unwrapping objects and ensure type safety.

if let index = array.checkIndexForSafety(index:Int)

  let item = array[safeIndex: index] 

if let index = array.checkIndexForSafety(index:Int)

  array[safeIndex: safeIndex] = myObject
extension Array {

    @warn_unused_result public func checkIndexForSafety(index: Int) -> SafeIndex? {

        if indices.contains(index) {

            // wrap index number in object, so can ensure type safety
            return SafeIndex(indexNumber: index)

        } else {
            return nil
        }
    }

    subscript(index:SafeIndex) -> Element {

        get {
            return self[index.indexNumber]
        }

        set {
            self[index.indexNumber] = newValue
        }
    }

    // second version of same subscript, but with different method signature, allowing user to highlight using safe index
    subscript(safeIndex index:SafeIndex) -> Element {

        get {
            return self[index.indexNumber]
        }

        set {
            self[index.indexNumber] = newValue
        }
    }

}

public class SafeIndex {

    var indexNumber:Int

    init(indexNumber:Int){
        self.indexNumber = indexNumber
    }
}
  • Interesting approach. Any reason SafeIndex is a class and not a struct? – stef Dec 20 '17 at 11:43

I found safe array get, set, insert, remove very useful. I prefer to log and ignore the errors as all else soon gets hard to manage. Full code bellow

/**
 Safe array get, set, insert and delete.
 All action that would cause an error are ignored.
 */
extension Array {

    /**
     Removes element at index.
     Action that would cause an error are ignored.
     */
    mutating func remove(safeAt index: Index) {
        guard index >= 0 && index < count else {
            print("Index out of bounds while deleting item at index \(index) in \(self). This action is ignored.")
            return
        }

        remove(at: index)
    }

    /**
     Inserts element at index.
     Action that would cause an error are ignored.
     */
    mutating func insert(_ element: Element, safeAt index: Index) {
        guard index >= 0 && index <= count else {
            print("Index out of bounds while inserting item at index \(index) in \(self). This action is ignored")
            return
        }

        insert(element, at: index)
    }

    /**
     Safe get set subscript.
     Action that would cause an error are ignored.
     */
    subscript (safe index: Index) -> Element? {
        get {
            return indices.contains(index) ? self[index] : nil
        }
        set {
            remove(safeAt: index)

            if let element = newValue {
                insert(element, safeAt: index)
            }
        }
    }
}

Tests

import XCTest

class SafeArrayTest: XCTestCase {
    func testRemove_Successful() {
        var array = [1, 2, 3]

        array.remove(safeAt: 1)

        XCTAssert(array == [1, 3])
    }

    func testRemove_Failure() {
        var array = [1, 2, 3]

        array.remove(safeAt: 3)

        XCTAssert(array == [1, 2, 3])
    }

    func testInsert_Successful() {
        var array = [1, 2, 3]

        array.insert(4, safeAt: 1)

        XCTAssert(array == [1, 4, 2, 3])
    }

    func testInsert_Successful_AtEnd() {
        var array = [1, 2, 3]

        array.insert(4, safeAt: 3)

        XCTAssert(array == [1, 2, 3, 4])
    }

    func testInsert_Failure() {
        var array = [1, 2, 3]

        array.insert(4, safeAt: 5)

        XCTAssert(array == [1, 2, 3])
    }

    func testGet_Successful() {
        var array = [1, 2, 3]

        let element = array[safe: 1]

        XCTAssert(element == 2)
    }

    func testGet_Failure() {
        var array = [1, 2, 3]

        let element = array[safe: 4]

        XCTAssert(element == nil)
    }

    func testSet_Successful() {
        var array = [1, 2, 3]

        array[safe: 1] = 4

        XCTAssert(array == [1, 4, 3])
    }

    func testSet_Successful_AtEnd() {
        var array = [1, 2, 3]

        array[safe: 3] = 4

        XCTAssert(array == [1, 2, 3, 4])
    }

    func testSet_Failure() {
        var array = [1, 2, 3]

        array[safe: 4] = 4

        XCTAssert(array == [1, 2, 3])
    }
}
extension Array {
    subscript (safe index: Index) -> Element? {
        return 0 <= index && index < count ? self[index] : nil
    }
}
  • O(1) performance
  • type safe
  • correctly deals with Optionals for [MyType?] (returns MyType??, that can be unwrapped on both levels)
  • does not lead to problems for Sets
  • concise code

Here are some tests I ran for you:

let itms: [Int?] = [0, nil]
let a = itms[safe: 0] // 0 : Int??
a ?? 5 // 0 : Int?
let b = itms[safe: 1] // nil : Int??
b ?? 5 // nil : Int?
let c = itms[safe: 2] // nil : Int??
c ?? 5 // 5 : Int?

Swift 4

An extension for those who prefer a more traditional syntax:

extension Array where Element: Equatable {

    func object(at index: Int) -> Element? {
        return indices.contains(index) ? self[index] : nil
    }
}

To build on Nikita Kukushkin's answer, sometimes you need to safely assign to array indexes as well as read from them, i.e.

myArray[safe: badIndex] = newValue

So here is an update to Nikita's answer (Swift 3.2) that also allows safely writing to mutable array indexes, by adding the safe: parameter name.

extension Collection {
    /// Returns the element at the specified index iff it is within bounds, otherwise nil.
    subscript(safe index: Index) -> Element? {
        return indices.contains(index) ? self[ index] : nil
    }
}

extension MutableCollection {
    subscript(safe index: Index) -> Element? {
        get {
            return indices.contains(index) ? self[ index] : nil
        }

        set(newValue) {
            if let newValue = newValue, indices.contains(index) {
                self[ index] = newValue
            }
        }
    }
}

I have padded the array with nils in my use case:

let components = [1, 2]
var nilComponents = components.map { $0 as Int? }
nilComponents += [nil, nil, nil]

switch (nilComponents[0], nilComponents[1], nilComponents[2]) {
case (_, _, .Some(5)):
    // process last component with 5
default:
    break
}

Also check the subscript extension with safe: label by Erica Sadun / Mike Ash: http://ericasadun.com/2015/06/01/swift-safe-array-indexing-my-favorite-thing-of-the-new-week/

I think this is not a good idea. It seems preferable to build solid code that does not result in trying to apply out-of-bounds indexes.

Please consider that having such an error fail silently (as suggested by your code above) by returning nil is prone to producing even more complex, more intractable errors.

You could do your override in a similar fashion you used and just write the subscripts in your own way. Only drawback is that existing code will not be compatible. I think to find a hook to override the generic x[i] (also without a text preprocessor as in C) will be challenging.

The closest I can think of is

// compile error:
if theIndex < str.count && let existing = str[theIndex]

EDIT: This actually works. One-liner!!

func ifInBounds(array: [AnyObject], idx: Int) -> AnyObject? {
    return idx < array.count ? array[idx] : nil
}

if let x: AnyObject = ifInBounds(swiftarray, 3) {
    println(x)
}
else {
    println("Out of bounds")
}
  • 6
    I would disagree - the point of the optional binding is that it only succeeds if the condition is met. (For an optional, it means there is a value.) Using an if let in this case does not make the program more complex, nor the errors more intractable. It simply condenses the traditional two-statement if bounds check and actual lookup into a single-lined, condensed statement. There are cases (particularly working in a UI) where it is normal for an index to be out of bounds, like asking an NSTableView for the selectedRow without a selection. – Craig Otis Aug 15 '14 at 15:35
  • 3
    @Mundi this seems to be a comment, rather than an answer to the OP's question. – jlehr Aug 15 '14 at 15:45
  • 1
    @CraigOtis Not sure I agree. You can write this check succinctly in a "single-line, condensed statement", e.g. using countElements or as the OP did with count, just not in the way the language defines writing array subscripts. – Mundi Aug 15 '14 at 16:11
  • 1
    @jlehr Maybe not. It is fair game to question the intention or wisdom of a problem posed. – Mundi Aug 15 '14 at 16:12
  • 2
    @Mundi Heh, especially if you later edit it to actually answer the question. :-) – jlehr Aug 15 '14 at 17:12
extension Array {
  subscript (safe index: UInt) -> Element? {
    return Int(index) < count ? self[Int(index)] : nil
  }
}

Using Above mention extension return nil if anytime index goes out of bound.

let fruits = ["apple","banana"]
print("result-\(fruits[safe : 2])")

result - nil

An update to Nikita's answer that addresses performance.

On that answer, collecting all the indices plus the calling of .contains(_:) could take a while on larger arrays. According to the docs .contains(_:) has a complexity of O(n) i.e it potentially loops through each element, therefore it could be a performance impediment on larger collections.

This update simply does a check against the upper and lower bounds via a Range.contains(_:) instead, so should theoretically be faster.

extension Collection {

    /// Returns the element at the specified index iff it is within bounds, otherwise nil.
    subscript (safe index: Index) -> Element? {
        return element(at: index)
    }

    /// Returns the element at the specified index iff it is within bounds, otherwise nil.
    func element(at index: Index) -> Element? {
        return (startIndex..<endIndex).contains(index) ? self[index] : nil
    }
}

How to catch such exception with wrong indexing:

extension Array {
    func lookup(index : UInt) throws -> Element {
        if Int(index) >= count {
            throw NSError(
                domain: "com.sadun",
                code: 0,
                userInfo: [NSLocalizedFailureReasonErrorKey: "Array index out of bounds"]
            )
        }

        return self[Int(index)]
    }
}

Example:

do {
    try ["Apple", "Banana", "Coconut"].lookup(index: 3)
} catch {
    print(error)
}

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