102

Before I updated xCode 6, I had no problems casting a double to a string but now it gives me an error

var a: Double = 1.5
var b: String = String(a)

It gives me the error message "double is not convertible to string". Is there any other way to do it?

  • 4
    It may also be useful to just define it like var b = "\(a)" – erdekhayser Oct 6 '14 at 12:36

13 Answers 13

195

It is not casting, it is creating a string from a value with a format.

let a:Double = 1.5
let b:String = String(format:"%f", a)
print("b: \(b)") // b: 1.500000

With a different format:

let c:String = String(format:"%.1f", a)
print("c: \(c)") // c: 1.5
  • 1
    What about a double with a bigger fraction digits number? Like let a = 2.34934340320 let stringValue = String(format: "%f", a) will give 2.349343 – Nico Mar 21 '15 at 12:33
  • 1
    The display can be controlled with the printf formatting options, see: String Format Specifiers and printf(3). – zaph Mar 21 '15 at 13:14
  • 2
    You just have to change your format to control the amount of digits: format:"%.1f" = 1 digit // 1.5; format:"%.5f" = 5 digits // 1.50000 – Megaetron Jul 9 '15 at 1:19
  • 3
    Please update your answer, in Swift 2.1 you just have to do String(yourDouble). – Alexandre G. Feb 24 '16 at 10:54
  • 1
    You can use let instead of var. There is not need now to call it several times. – Oleksandr Apr 30 '18 at 0:22
71
let double = 1.5 
let string = double.description

update Xcode 7.1 • Swift 2.1:

Now Double is also convertible to String so you can simply use it as you wish:

let double = 1.5
let doubleString = String(double)   // "1.5"

Swift 3 or later we can extend LosslessStringConvertible and make it generic

Xcode 11.3 • Swift 5.1 or later

extension LosslessStringConvertible { 
    var string: String { .init(self) } 
}

let double = 1.5 
let string = double.string  //  "1.5"

For a fixed number of fraction digits we can extend FloatingPoint protocol:

extension FloatingPoint {
    func fixedFraction(digits: Int) -> String {
        return String(format: "%.*f", digits, self as! CVarArg)
    }
}

If you need more control over your number format (minimum and maximum fraction digits and rounding mode) you can use NumberFormatter:

extension Formatter {
    static let number = NumberFormatter()
}

extension FloatingPoint {
    func fractionDigits(min: Int = 2, max: Int = 2, roundingMode: NumberFormatter.RoundingMode = .halfEven) -> String {
        Formatter.number.minimumFractionDigits = min
        Formatter.number.maximumFractionDigits = max
        Formatter.number.roundingMode = roundingMode
        Formatter.number.numberStyle = .decimal
        return Formatter.number.string(for: self) ?? ""
    }
}

2.12345.fractionDigits()                                    // "2.12"
2.12345.fractionDigits(min: 3, max: 3, roundingMode: .up)   // "2.124"
  • 1
    is this a hack or is this a legit way to do it? would it cause any problems with different ios versions? – Esqarrouth Dec 30 '14 at 20:23
  • 2
    No, you won't have any problems with different ios versions. It also works for OSX. BTW this is what you get when doing String Interpolation with a Double or an Int. – Leo Dabus Dec 30 '14 at 20:26
  • Very useful. You can't format like %f. And It works also for Int so you have one way to do it for two types. – Patrik Vaberer Apr 9 '15 at 11:56
  • This won't work for 0.00001, it becomes "1e-05" as a string. – Alex Mar 10 '16 at 13:34
  • Replace String(format: "%.\(digits)f", self as! CVarArg) with String(format: "%.*f", digits, self as! CVarArg) – rmaddy Oct 27 '19 at 18:09
20

In addition to @Zaph answer, you can create extension:

extension Double {
    func toString() -> String {
        return String(format: "%.1f",self)
    }
}

Usage:

var a:Double = 1.5
println("output: \(a.toString())")  // output: 1.5
  • 1
    @MaximShoustin The OP does not have enough rep to up vote and answer, 15 is required. I also disagree with creating an Extension, when the statement: a.toString() is seen by another developer there will definitely be a WTF moment. – zaph Aug 16 '14 at 17:41
  • 1
    @Zaph why not. For sure you can add some prefix and change it to myToString() to be sure that its custom definition. But like in other languages prototyping leads to avoiding code duplicate and good maintenance. – Maxim Shoustin Aug 16 '14 at 18:58
  • @MaximShoustin newbie question: what's the difference between println("output: \(a.toString())") and println("output: \(a)"). Second option doesn't cause compile errors. Is this option a bad practice? – Alex Guerrero Nov 27 '14 at 10:29
  • Is there a clever way to write such an extension to Double or FloatingPoint that would work on an Optional Double to return an empty String? – Kinergy Feb 1 '19 at 18:05
11

Swift 3+: Try these line of code

let num: Double = 1.5

let str = String(format: "%.2f", num)
9

to make anything a string in swift except maybe enum values simply do what you do in the println() method

for example:

var stringOfDBL = "\(myDouble)"
3

Swift 4: Use following code

let number = 2.4
let string = String(format: "%.2f", number)
3

This function will let you specify the number of decimal places to show:

func doubleToString(number:Double, numberOfDecimalPlaces:Int) -> String {
    return String(format:"%."+numberOfDecimalPlaces.description+"f", number)
}

Usage:

let numberString = doubleToStringDecimalPlacesWithDouble(number: x, numberOfDecimalPlaces: 2)
  • Replace String(format:"%."+numberOfDecimalPlaces.description+"f", number) with String(format:"%.*f", numberOfDecimalPlaces, number) – rmaddy Oct 27 '19 at 18:10
2

In swift 3 it is simple as given below

let stringDouble =  String(describing: double)
  • 3
    This returns e.g. "Optional(6.1696108999999995)" for me. – McSullivan D'Ander Feb 22 '17 at 15:28
1

In swift 3:

var a: Double = 1.5
var b: String = String(a)
0
var b = String(stringInterpolationSegment: a)

This works for me. You may have a try

0

In Swift 4 if you like to modify and use a Double in the UI as a textLabel "String" you can add this in the end of your file:

    extension Double {
func roundToInt() -> Int{
    return Int(Darwin.round(self))
}

}

And use it like this if you like to have it in a textlabel:

currentTemp.text = "\(weatherData.tempCelsius.roundToInt())"

Or print it as an Int:

print(weatherData.tempCelsius.roundToInt())
0

I would prefer NSNumber and NumberFormatter approach (where need), also u can use extension to avoid bloating code

extension Double {

   var toString: String {
      return NSNumber(value: self).stringValue
   }

}

U can also need reverse approach

extension String {

    var toDouble: Double {
        return Double(self) ?? .nan
    }

}
  • why are you returning optional but assigning .nan if nil? You should do either one or another. Not both. Btw Whats wrong with using the String initializer ? You can also make it more generic extending LossLessStringConvertible protocol instead of extending Double extension LosslessStringConvertible { var string: String { return .init(self) } } – Leo Dabus Jun 23 '19 at 15:14
  • U are right returning Double? Is a refuse since I already check it is nil and return NaN – Giuseppe Mazzilli Jun 25 '19 at 22:03
0

Swift 5: Use following code

extension Double {

    func getStringValue(withFloatingPoints points: Int = 0) -> String {
        let valDouble = modf(self)
        let fractionalVal = (valDouble.1)
        if fractionalVal > 0 {
            return String(format: "%.*f", points, self)
        }
        return String(format: "%.0f", self)
    }
}
  • Replace String(format: "%.\(points)f", self) with String(format: "%.*f", points, self) – rmaddy Oct 27 '19 at 18:12
  • @rmaddy - updated my answer, thank you. – g212gs Nov 1 '19 at 10:50

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