10

I am trying to draw a potential field for a given object using the following formula:

U=-α_goal*e^(-((x-x_goal )^2/a_goal +(y-y_goal^2)/b_goal ) )

using the following code

    # Set limits and number of points in grid
    xmax = 10.0
    xmin = -xmax
    NX = 20
    ymax = 10.0
    ymin = -ymax
    NY = 20
    # Make grid and calculate vector components
    x = linspace(xmin, xmax, NX)
    y = linspace(ymin, ymax, NY)
    X, Y = meshgrid(x, y)
    x_obstacle = 0
    y_obstacle = 0
    alpha_obstacle = 1
    a_obstacle = 1
    b_obstacle = 1
    P = -alpha_obstacle * exp(-(X - x_obstacle)**2 / a_obstacle + (Y - y_obstacle)**2 / b_obstacle)
    Ey,Ex = gradient(P)
    print Ey
    print Ex

    QP = quiver(X, Y, Ex, Ey)

    show()

This code calculates a potential field. How can I plot this potential field nicely? Also, given a potential field, what is the best way to convert it to a vector field? (vector field is the minus gradient of the potential field. )

I would appreciate any help.

I have tried using np.gradient() but the result is not what I have expected:

enter image description here

What I do expect, is something along these lines: enter image description here

EDIT: After changing the two lines in the code:

y, x = np.mgrid[500:-100:200j, 1000:-100:200j] 
p = -1 * np.exp(-((x - 893.6)**2 / 1000 + (y - 417.35)**2 / 1000))

I have an incorrect plot: it seems to be inverted left-right (arrows seem to be in correct spot but not the field):enter image description here EDIT: Fixed by changing to y, x = np.mgrid[500:-100:200j, -100:1000:200j] Any idea why?

  • It sounds like you want a matplotlib quiver plot – CoryKramer Aug 16 '14 at 17:26
  • Yes, I have looked at the quiver function. Given my formula for P, how do I get U and V from matplotlib.org/api/pyplot_api.html#matplotlib.pyplot.quiver ?I think my formula just gives me a potential value at each location and not a vector. Am I missing something? – Tad Aug 16 '14 at 17:32
  • @Tad - Use numpy.gradient to get the gradient of the potential field. E.g. v, u = np.gradient(P) in your example above. (It returns dy, dx rather than dx, dy because numpy arrays are indexed row, column rather than column, row.) – Joe Kington Aug 16 '14 at 18:46
  • Thank you Joe, I did try that method - I have updated my post to show what I obtained. Could you let me know what I am doing incorrectly? – Tad Aug 16 '14 at 18:59
38

First off, let's evaluate it on a regular grid, similar to your example code. (On a side note, you have an error in the code to evaluate your equation. It's missing a negative inside the exp.):

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

# Set limits and number of points in grid
y, x = np.mgrid[10:-10:100j, 10:-10:100j]

x_obstacle, y_obstacle = 0.0, 0.0
alpha_obstacle, a_obstacle, b_obstacle = 1.0, 1e3, 2e3

p = -alpha_obstacle * np.exp(-((x - x_obstacle)**2 / a_obstacle
                               + (y - y_obstacle)**2 / b_obstacle))

Next, we'll need to calculate the gradient (this is a simple finite-difference, as opposed to analytically calculating the derivative of the function above):

# For the absolute values of "dx" and "dy" to mean anything, we'll need to
# specify the "cellsize" of our grid.  For purely visual purposes, though,
# we could get away with just "dy, dx = np.gradient(p)".
dy, dx = np.gradient(p, np.diff(y[:2, 0]), np.diff(x[0, :2]))

Now we can make a "quiver" plot, however, the results probably won't be quite what you'd expect, as an arrow is being displayed at every point on the grid:

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
ax.quiver(x, y, dx, dy, p)
ax.set(aspect=1, title='Quiver Plot')
plt.show()

enter image description here

Let's make the arrows bigger. The easiest way to do this is to plot every n-th arrow and let matplotlib handle the autoscaling. We'll use every 3rd point here. If you want fewer, larger arrows, change the 3 to a larger integer number.

# Every 3rd point in each direction.
skip = (slice(None, None, 3), slice(None, None, 3))

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
ax.quiver(x[skip], y[skip], dx[skip], dy[skip], p[skip])
ax.set(aspect=1, title='Quiver Plot')
plt.show()

enter image description here

Better, but those arrows are still pretty hard to see. A better way to visualize this might be with an image plot with black gradient arrows overlayed:

skip = (slice(None, None, 3), slice(None, None, 3))

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
im = ax.imshow(p, extent=[x.min(), x.max(), y.min(), y.max()])
ax.quiver(x[skip], y[skip], dx[skip], dy[skip])

fig.colorbar(im)
ax.set(aspect=1, title='Quiver Plot')
plt.show()

enter image description here

Ideally, we'd want to use a different colormap or change the arrow colors. I'll leave that part to you. You might also consider a contour plot (ax.contour(x, y, p)) or a streamplot (ax.streamplot(x, y, dx, dy). Just to show a quick example of those:

fig, ax = plt.subplots()

ax.streamplot(x, y, dx, dy, color=p, density=0.5, cmap='gist_earth')

cont = ax.contour(x, y, p, cmap='gist_earth')
ax.clabel(cont)

ax.set(aspect=1, title='Streamplot with contours')
plt.show()

enter image description here

...And just for the sake of getting really fancy:

from matplotlib.patheffects import withStroke

fig, ax = plt.subplots()

ax.streamplot(x, y, dx, dy, linewidth=500*np.hypot(dx, dy),
              color=p, density=1.2, cmap='gist_earth')

cont = ax.contour(x, y, p, cmap='gist_earth', vmin=p.min(), vmax=p.max())
labels = ax.clabel(cont)

plt.setp(labels, path_effects=[withStroke(linewidth=8, foreground='w')])

ax.set(aspect=1, title='Streamplot with contours')
plt.show()

enter image description here

  • wow, this is great! I will look closely at your code but wanted to thank you right now for your great reply! – Tad Aug 16 '14 at 19:28
  • Happy to help! If anything isn't clear or doesn't work, feel free to ask. – Joe Kington Aug 16 '14 at 19:36
  • Seems to work, I will play around, thank you again! – Tad Aug 16 '14 at 19:46
  • 2
    Careful with numpy.gradient -- the default step size is 1, so it's in the above example the result is not correctly scaled. – pv. Aug 17 '14 at 14:09
  • @pv - Good point! It won't have any visual effect, in this case, but the absolute values of dx and dy are completely wrong, as you pointed out. Updated the answer to use the step size. Thanks! – Joe Kington Aug 17 '14 at 14:48

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.