I'm parsing a text file that is being mapped to some java code like such:

public void eval(Node arg)
    {
        if(arg.data.equals("rand"))
        {
            moveRandomly();
        }
        else if(arg.data.equals("home"))
        {
            goHome();
        }
            else if(arg.data.equals("iffood"))
    {
        ifFoodHere(arg.left, arg.right);
    }//snip..

This is going to need to be re-evaluated about a thousand times and I'd rather not have to traverse the whole thing every time. Is there any way to make this traversal once and then have it be a function that is called every other time?

You could make a Map of Runnables:

Map<String, Runnable> methods = new HashMap<String, Runnable>();
methods.put("rand", new Runnable() 
{
    public void run()
    {
        moveRandomly();
    }
});
...

then in your method

public void eval(Node arg)
{
    Runnable command = methods.get(arg.data);
    command.run();
}
  • I think you mean Callable? If he does Runnable then each command will run in a separate thread, which is going to be very different from what the original code does. – Adrian Petrescu Mar 29 '10 at 0:41
  • Callable<T> runs in a separate thread too. It returns a value of type T; Runnable does not. – duffymo Mar 29 '10 at 0:43
  • 3
    Runnable only runs in a separate thread if I start it in a new thread though, right? You could use whatever class you want. He could even make his own class with a method that takes Node as a parameter so he can access the other data on the node, as he expressed might be something he wants. – Joel Mar 29 '10 at 0:50
  • @Joel - Correct, both Runnable and Callable require a Thread to start. – duffymo Mar 29 '10 at 12:10
  • Most of the API docs for Runnable talk about threads. Then the last sentence says there isn't really a contract for the interface. I suggest using a meaningful interface for the task. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 30 '10 at 3:21

Create an anonymous inner class.

Something like:

public Callable<Void> eval(Node arg)
{
  if(arg.data.equals("rand"))
  {
    return new Callable<Void>{ public Void call() { moveRandomly(); return null; } };
  }
  ...
}

Callable<Void> f = eval(a);
f.call();
  • The eval function is recursively called through children. Does this change how this might work? – stereos Mar 29 '10 at 0:38
  • You can call a callable which was returned by an recursive eval in the callable you create. ps. Sounds like a tongue twister. :) – lexicore Mar 29 '10 at 0:55
  • java.util.concurrent.Callable? Ergh. Push the boat: Write the three lines of code for a meaningful interface. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 30 '10 at 3:20
  • I said nothing about 'java.util.concurrent'. Just some 'Callable'. – lexicore Mar 30 '10 at 5:00

If you know all the arguments/commands you can expect, i might do it like this:

enum Args {
  home, rand, iffood;

  private Method method;

  private Args () {
    try {
      this.method = Commands.class.getMethod(this.name(), Node.class);
    } catch (final Exception e) {}
  }
  public void invoke (final Node args)
    throws IllegalArgumentException, IllegalAccessException,
      InvocationTargetException {
    this.method.invoke(null, args);
  }
  public static Args valueOf (final Node arg) {
    return valueOf(arg.data);
  }
  public static void eval (final Node arg)
    throws IllegalArgumentException, IllegalAccessException,
      InvocationTargetException {
    valueOf(arg).invoke(arg);
  }
}

Command implementations are:

class Commands {    
  public static void home (final Node arg) {
    goHome(); // Call the implementation
    // or simply make these bodies the implementations.
  }
  public static void iffood (final Node arg) {
    ifFoodHere(arg.left, arg.right);
  }    
  public static void rand (final Node arg) {
    moveRandom();
  }
  //...
}

your eval() then becomes, simply:

try {
  Args.eval(arg);
} catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
  // Handle unknown arg.data
}
  • +1 for the enum approach... but you can simplify further, each enum could have an apply(final Node arg) method that is defined separately for each enum. Then you don't need the separate Commands class or the use of reflection. – Jason S Mar 29 '10 at 2:06

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