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I needed to append some text to a bunch of files in a directory, so I thought I'd be clever and try something like this:

find . -name "*.txt" -exec cat source >> {} \;

Which did not work, of course, because the redirect gets picked up by the shell calling find, and not by the exec.

I ended up using BBEdit and a multi-file find/replace to do it, but I am sure there's some way to make find do this from the command line, but what?

Well, OK, I can think of one solution, but I don't like it: have exec spawn a shell for each result. That might work.

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    Is it just a directory without subdirectories? If so, you can do: for file in /your/dir/*.txt; do cat source >> "$file"; done – fedorqui Aug 18 '14 at 8:20
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What about :

find . -name "*.txt" -exec dd if=source of='{}' oflag=append conv=notrunc ';'

You should be able to use it with files with spaces and special characters.

  • I completely forgot that dd had the ability to append. This is very clever. – lbutlr Aug 18 '14 at 18:25
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You have at least two options:

find . -name "*.txt" -exec sh -c 'f={}; cat source >> $f' \;
                     ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

This executes the command invoking the exec function of find. Note it would be also convenient to use -type f just to match files.

Or you can use a simple for loop, that will loop through all the files matching the pattern *.txt:

for file in *.txt
do
    cat source >> "$file"
done
  • yeah, spawning a shell for each matched file seems like a bad idea if it's more than a few hundred files, but maybe that's just because I was 'raised' on a system with probably 16MB of RAM for 40 users. – lbutlr Aug 18 '14 at 8:27
  • Yes, true, in such case it is not a very good idea. However, I don't know how it will perform the for file in *.txt if it matches hundred of items -maybe you get the "too many arguments" error. Let us know how it works! – fedorqui Aug 18 '14 at 8:30
  • What if I create a file named "David's file.txt" – Vouze Aug 18 '14 at 14:55
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    With bash "for file in *.txt" is not expanded. So you will never have "too many arguments". – Vouze Aug 18 '14 at 14:59
  • @Vouze oh, you are right about the "too many arguments". Regarding the file named with some single quotes, in such case we should look for other ways (yours with dd could be one), but I think it is quite unlikely to happen and I prefer to leave the solution right how it is now. But thanks for pointing it and +1 for your approach. – fedorqui Aug 18 '14 at 15:07

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