20

Is there a way that I can define __init__ so keywords defined in **kwargs are assigned to the class?

For example, if I were to initialize a ValidationRule class with ValidationRule(other='email'), the value for self.other should be added to the class without having to explicitly name every possible kwarg.

class ValidationRule:
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        # code to assign **kwargs to .self
4
  • Is there a reason you're not using new-style classes? Mar 29, 2010 at 5:28
  • @Georg: I don't even know what new-style classes are? I'm using Python 2.5 if that's relevant.
    – mpen
    Mar 29, 2010 at 5:30
  • 3
    To create a newstyle class you just need to inherit from a newstyle class (usually object) so use class ValidationRule(object): More info here: python.org/doc/newstyle Mar 29, 2010 at 6:47
  • Newstyle..? seems to be old style in python3? is this will even work in there?
    – holms
    Oct 6, 2015 at 18:32

7 Answers 7

32

I think somewhere on the stackoverflow I've seen such solution. Anyway it can look like:

class ValidationRule:
    __allowed = ("other", "same", "different")
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        for k, v in kwargs.iteritems():
            assert( k in self.__class__.__allowed )
            setattr(self, k, v)

This class will only accept arguments with a whitelisted attribute names listed in __allowed.

4
  • ValidationRule is just my base class, and it doesn't have any of its own attributes, so there isn't anything they can accidentally overwrite, but otherwise, this would be a good safe guard ;) I'd probably use a blacklist instead of a whitelist in this case though, so as not to restrict them too much.
    – mpen
    Mar 29, 2010 at 5:40
  • 1
    Python-3 renamed dict.iteritems -> dict.items, more information
    – Mr. Hobo
    Jan 5, 2021 at 8:10
  • I don't know if this is a python3 issue, but sending an invalid kwargs raises AssertionError in python 3.8. I used try...catch to overcome this
    – Mr. Hobo
    Jan 5, 2021 at 8:14
  • @Mr.Hobo, you should be able to see source of assertion, and most likely it will lead to line assert( k in self.__class__.__allowed ) which is there to justify last sentence of the answer about validation and it is the sole role of it ;) I.e. it can be removed if you don't like that or replaced with different way of handling that.
    – ony
    Jan 11, 2021 at 19:41
20

This may not be the cleanest way, but it works:

class ValidationRule: 
    def __init__(self, **kwargs): 
        self.__dict__.update(kwargs)

I think I prefer ony's solution because it restricts available properties to keep you out of trouble when your input comes from external sources.

1
  • 1
    It won't work correctly if variable is a "magic" one. Consider propeties and slotted objects. That applies to both Python 2 and Python 3.
    – WGH
    Sep 7, 2013 at 11:55
12

You could do something like this:

class ValidationRule:
   def __init__(self, **kwargs):
      for (k, v) in kwargs.items():
         setattr(self, k, v)
3
  • 2
    If the kwargs list is long, you might want to use iteritems() instead of items(). For your purpose that should be fine though. Mar 29, 2010 at 10:25
  • @GeorgSchölly What's the difference between iteritems() and items()?
    – Stevoisiak
    Feb 6, 2018 at 19:17
  • @StevenVascellaro In Python 2 iteritems(), returns a generator while items() returns a list. In Python 3, items() returns an itemview and iteritems() was removed. I prefer items() because it's compatible with both. For very large dicts, I still use iteritems(). See also stackoverflow.com/questions/13998492/iteritems-in-python Feb 7, 2018 at 8:03
4
class ValidationRule:
   def __init__(self, **kwargs):
      self.__dict__.update(kwargs)
3

You can set your kwargs arguments by updating __dict__ attribute of the instance.

class ValidationRule:
   def __init__(self, **kwargs):
       self.__dict__.update(kwargs)
3

This could be considered nicer than updating __dict__:

class C:
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        vars(self).update(kwargs)

>>> c = C(a='a', b='b')
>>> c.a   # returns 'a'
>>> c.b   # returns 'b'
1
  • why is it nicer?
    – The Fool
    Jun 9 at 20:29
0

I found the above answers helpful and then refined:

class MyObj(object):
    def __init__(self, key1=1, key2=2, key3=3):
        for (k, v) in locals().iteritems():
            if k != 'self':
                setattr(self, k, v)

Test:

>>> myobj = MyObj(key1=0)
>>> print myobj.key1
0

And validation is also there:

>>> myobj = MyObj(key4=4)
TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'key4'

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.