3

I'm trying to create a header file (that will include functions I wrote for AVL Trees) but I am having a slight problem and misunderstanding about the syntax of include guards.

Right now my code looks like this

#ifndef STDIO_H
#define STDIO_H
#endif
#ifndef STDLIB_H
#define STDLIB_H
#endif
#ifndef CONIO_H
#define CONIO_H
#endif

problem is, I think it only includes <stdio.h>. When I try to use malloc, it says malloc is undefined, even though I included stdlib.

According to http://www.cprogramming.com/reference/preprocessor/ifndef.html if i understood correctly, ifndef checks if the token is defined, and if it isnt, it defines everything i write after ifndef and until #endif. So my code should work.

Is stdio defined? no. so define it. endif. is stdlib defined? no. so define it. endif. is conio defined? no. so define it. endif. I don't see the problem.

What is the correct syntax if I want to add those 3 headers?

  • 3
    Your code does not include anything. Are you under impression that include guards may be used instead of include? – Wojtek Surowka Aug 18 '14 at 10:33
  • What does #define do then? – Oria Gruber Aug 18 '14 at 10:34
  • 1
    You shouldn't provide include guards for standard headers. You provide them to fencepost your headers. And you're not #include-ing anything, so I can only imagine the number of "undeclared function xxxx returns int" warnings you're getting. – WhozCraig Aug 18 '14 at 10:34
  • So its not a problem if in my avltree.h i included stdio, but also in .c file i included both avltree.h and stdio.h? in this case, i include stdio.h twice. isnt that a problem? – Oria Gruber Aug 18 '14 at 10:36
  • 1
    @OriaGruber not if the standard headers have their own include guards (and they do). – WhozCraig Aug 18 '14 at 10:36
5

Include guards are used to prevent double definition in case an include file get included more than once.

The standard include files have the necessary include guards, so you need no include guards for them.

Your code should be:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <conio.h>
  • 1
    So I can always safely include stdio, stdlib, and conio in any header I write? suppose I wrote stack.h that includes all of the above. and now I'm writing avltree.h which includes stack. can i also include stdio,stdlib and conio again? can i include them in a .c file that also include stack or avltree? – Oria Gruber Aug 18 '14 at 10:41
  • 1
    Yes! It is safe to include them multiple times. – Klas Lindbäck Aug 18 '14 at 10:42
  • @OriaGruber Not only can you, you should include them "again" under the supposition you have no reliance on stack.h pulling them in for you. If you need the services of a header, then pull in the header. If the headers are properly guarding themselves, it won't be an issue. And never write a header the relies on the translation unit that is including it to have previously including something else before said-header. That is equally problem-rich and a sign of poor design. – WhozCraig Aug 18 '14 at 17:28
2

The following declaration will not include your stdio.h header.

#ifndef STDIO_H
#define STDIO_H
#endif

If you declare like this, it not meaning that it will include your stdio.h header file. Its is best suitable method for "Own headers".

You need to include All the declarations and function definition like below in your own header(avltree.h) file-

#ifndef AVLTREE_H
#define AVLTREE_H

/* YOUR HEADER FILE STUFF */

#endif

Then include that header file in your main program.

stdio.h, stdlib.h and conio.h are already available header files, you can directly include all the files in main program file-

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<conio.h>
1

You put the include guards in your own headers.

As in:

//GameEntity.hpp
#ifndef __H_GAME_ENTITY
#define __H_GAME_ENTITY

class GameEntity{
  //whatever
};

#endif

Then it will only be included once into a compilation unit.

Now something like this will not fail:

#include <GameEntity.hpp>
#include <GameEntity.hpp>

int main(){ return 0; };
0

The correct syntax to add those 3 headers is:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <conio.h>

The #ifndef is a preprocessor directive that is to be followed by a token, let it be X. It will check whether that X has been defined through #define preprocessor directive, and if not, the subsequent lines will be processed by your compiler, until the corresponding #endif. For example;

// #define X
// #define X 123456

#ifndef X
/* some code */
#endif

The thing above can be read as if X is not defined. The /* some code */ part will be regarded only if X is not defined, and in this case, X is not, so it will. If I were to un-comment either one of the #define ...s above, the /* some code */ part would be disregarded by the compiler.

An include guard is something that utilizes this thing I've explained above with the #ifndef. You don't have to worry about such, until you come to the point that you make header files for your own.

Header files generally (usually) have #include guards within themselves. Whatever they do, they first check whether some specific token has been defined or not. If not, then they'll define that token themselves and do whatever. If it already had been defined, then they do nothing. This is to prevent unwanted multiply definitions of whatever inside. For example, if you were to check the <stdio.h> of MSVC 2013, you'd see that it starts and end as follows:

#ifndef _INC_STDIO
#define _INC_STDIO

// hundreds of lines in between

#endif

Thanks to this, if you were to write something like:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdio.h>

// ...

In your code, the second #include would do almost nothing, because the first one would already execute the line #define _INC_STDIO, which defines _INC_STDIO and prevents almost everything in <stdio.h> to be executed again with subsequent includes.

This is not to prevent excuse me, 'stupid' mistakes of the programmer though, it rather is useful when a header file includes another header file itself. For example, both <stdio.h> and <stdlib.h> in MSVC 2013 attempt to include <crtdefs.h> as their first operation. Now, if <crtdefs.h> would have been included twice, bunch of type definitions inside would be multiply defined, and they shouldn't. Of course I may sanely write the following on top of my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

// ...

And #include guards would save the day there for me, preventing contents of <crtdefs.h> to be multiply executed.

-1

As in the previous comments and everyone pointed out, you have not included anything in your main header file.

Even I also prepare the single header file and I prefer doing like as follows:

Suppose you have a main header file "includes.h" in which you are including all the header file. Then

#ifndef INCLUDES_H
#define INCLUDES_H

#ifndef STDIO_H
     #include <stdio.h>
#endif

#ifndef STDLIB_H
     #include <stdlib.h>
#endif

#ifndef CONIO_H
     #include <conio.h>
#endif

//If you have any of your own header files, then include them the same way
#ifndef USER_AVL_HEADER_FILE
     #include <user_avl_header_file.h>
#endif    

#endif   // INCLUDES_H

And then like you have your header file name "user_avl_header_file.h", then in that header file put the header guards again:

#include "includes.h"

#ifndef USER_AVL_HEADER_FILE
#define USER_AVL_HEADER_FILE

/*your class and your code*/

#endif    //USER_AVL_HEADER_FILE

and in your source file just include the main header file "includes.h" without any worries.

  • 1
    Sorry, but I have to vote this down. You absolutely should not worry about whether the include-guard token has been defined or not while using #include preprocessor directive. The header file that is being included should itself care whether that specific token has been defined or not. What you've suggested over here, is nothing but a clutter. – ThoAppelsin Aug 18 '14 at 12:00
  • I know that it does not matter, checking whether the include-guard token has been defined or not while using #include preprocessor but thats how my organisation's "coding style" is. And sadly I'm used to it now, that's why I already stated that the way I prefer. And when the "includes.h" is included again than the compiler won't going to enter in the file again as #INCLUDES_H is already defined. – Arpit Aug 19 '14 at 22:14

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