240

I need to mark routines as deprecated, but apparently there's no standard library decorator for deprecation. I am aware of recipes for it and the warnings module, but my question is: why is there no standard library decorator for this (common) task ?

Additional question: are there standard decorators in the standard library at all ?

8
  • 25
    now there is a deprecation package
    – muon
    Nov 1, 2017 at 21:13
  • 21
    I understand the ways to do it, but came here for some insight on why it's not in the std lib (as I assume is the case of the OP) and don't see a good answer to the actual question Apr 1, 2019 at 14:57
  • 23
    Why does it happen so often that questions get dozens of answers that don't even attempt to answer the question, and actively ignore things like "I'm aware of recipes"? It's maddening!
    – Catskul
    May 2, 2019 at 16:46
  • 8
    @Catskul because of fake internet points. May 2, 2019 at 19:07
  • 3
    I'm unaware of any ruling against "why" questions, but IMO lots of "why" questions are likely to have a succinct answer, and the question/answers can be important so I'd be sad if they were disallowed.
    – Catskul
    May 27, 2021 at 15:34

7 Answers 7

93

Here's some snippet, modified from those cited by Leandro:

import warnings
import functools

def deprecated(func):
    """This is a decorator which can be used to mark functions
    as deprecated. It will result in a warning being emitted
    when the function is used."""
    @functools.wraps(func)
    def new_func(*args, **kwargs):
        warnings.simplefilter('always', DeprecationWarning)  # turn off filter
        warnings.warn("Call to deprecated function {}.".format(func.__name__),
                      category=DeprecationWarning,
                      stacklevel=2)
        warnings.simplefilter('default', DeprecationWarning)  # reset filter
        return func(*args, **kwargs)
    return new_func

# Examples

@deprecated
def some_old_function(x, y):
    return x + y

class SomeClass:
    @deprecated
    def some_old_method(self, x, y):
        return x + y

Because in some interpreters the first solution exposed (without filter handling) may result in a warning suppression.

8
  • 14
    Why not use functools.wraps rather than setting the name and doc like that?
    – Maximilian
    Aug 6, 2015 at 14:40
  • 1
    @Maximilian: Edited to add that, to save future copy-pasters of this code from doing it wrong too
    – Eric
    Jun 28, 2016 at 3:59
  • 35
    I do not like side effect (turning the filter on / off). It's not the job of the decorator to decide this.
    – Kentzo
    Apr 18, 2017 at 17:48
  • 25
    doesn't answer the actual question.
    – Catskul
    May 2, 2019 at 16:41
  • 4
    Strongly agree with @Kentzo - disabling filters then resetting them to defaults is going to give some developer an amazing headache
    – Aaron
    Dec 7, 2020 at 21:34
83

Here is another solution:

This decorator (a decorator factory in fact) allow you to give a reason message. It is also more useful to help the developer to diagnose the problem by giving the source filename and line number.

EDIT: This code use Zero's recommendation: it replace warnings.warn_explicit line by warnings.warn(msg, category=DeprecationWarning, stacklevel=2), which prints the function call site rather than the function definition site. It makes debugging easier.

EDIT2: This version allow the developper to specify an optional "reason" message.

import functools
import inspect
import warnings

string_types = (type(b''), type(u''))


def deprecated(reason):
    """
    This is a decorator which can be used to mark functions
    as deprecated. It will result in a warning being emitted
    when the function is used.
    """

    if isinstance(reason, string_types):

        # The @deprecated is used with a 'reason'.
        #
        # .. code-block:: python
        #
        #    @deprecated("please, use another function")
        #    def old_function(x, y):
        #      pass

        def decorator(func1):

            if inspect.isclass(func1):
                fmt1 = "Call to deprecated class {name} ({reason})."
            else:
                fmt1 = "Call to deprecated function {name} ({reason})."

            @functools.wraps(func1)
            def new_func1(*args, **kwargs):
                warnings.simplefilter('always', DeprecationWarning)
                warnings.warn(
                    fmt1.format(name=func1.__name__, reason=reason),
                    category=DeprecationWarning,
                    stacklevel=2
                )
                warnings.simplefilter('default', DeprecationWarning)
                return func1(*args, **kwargs)

            return new_func1

        return decorator

    elif inspect.isclass(reason) or inspect.isfunction(reason):

        # The @deprecated is used without any 'reason'.
        #
        # .. code-block:: python
        #
        #    @deprecated
        #    def old_function(x, y):
        #      pass

        func2 = reason

        if inspect.isclass(func2):
            fmt2 = "Call to deprecated class {name}."
        else:
            fmt2 = "Call to deprecated function {name}."

        @functools.wraps(func2)
        def new_func2(*args, **kwargs):
            warnings.simplefilter('always', DeprecationWarning)
            warnings.warn(
                fmt2.format(name=func2.__name__),
                category=DeprecationWarning,
                stacklevel=2
            )
            warnings.simplefilter('default', DeprecationWarning)
            return func2(*args, **kwargs)

        return new_func2

    else:
        raise TypeError(repr(type(reason)))

You can use this decorator for functions, methods and classes.

Here is a simple example:

@deprecated("use another function")
def some_old_function(x, y):
    return x + y


class SomeClass(object):
    @deprecated("use another method")
    def some_old_method(self, x, y):
        return x + y


@deprecated("use another class")
class SomeOldClass(object):
    pass


some_old_function(5, 3)
SomeClass().some_old_method(8, 9)
SomeOldClass()

You'll get:

deprecated_example.py:59: DeprecationWarning: Call to deprecated function or method some_old_function (use another function).
  some_old_function(5, 3)
deprecated_example.py:60: DeprecationWarning: Call to deprecated function or method some_old_method (use another method).
  SomeClass().some_old_method(8, 9)
deprecated_example.py:61: DeprecationWarning: Call to deprecated class SomeOldClass (use another class).
  SomeOldClass()

EDIT3: This decorator is now part of the Deprecated library:

New stable release v1.2.13 🎉

7
  • 6
    Works, well - I prefer replacing the warn_explicit line with warnings.warn(msg, category=DeprecationWarning, stacklevel=2) which prints the function call site rather than the function definition site. It makes debugging easier.
    – Zero
    Nov 28, 2016 at 23:24
  • Hello, I would like to use your code snippet in a GPLv3-licensed library. Would you be willing to relicense your code under GPLv3 or any more permissive license, so that I can legally do so?
    – gerrit
    Jul 7, 2017 at 17:19
  • 1
    @LaurentLAPORTE I know. CC-BY-SO does not permit usage within GPLv3 (because of the share-alike bit), which is why I'm asking if you would be willing to release this code specifically additionally under a GPL-compatible license. If not, that's fine, and I won't use your code.
    – gerrit
    Jul 9, 2017 at 14:27
  • 15
    doesn't answer the actual question.
    – Catskul
    May 2, 2019 at 16:42
  • 2
    @DannyVarod I know, but for code, CC-BY-SA is even more restrictive than GPL. When I asked the question, I was working on a GPL library. GPL libraries can use GPL code or more permissive code, but GPL libraries can not use CC-BY-SA code, so I was not able to use this code snippet. (And CC-BY-SA was never used for code anyway; SO would do good in licensing code snippets in user contributions under something more permissive, because as it is now, most users cannot use code snippets they find on SO)
    – gerrit
    May 9, 2021 at 20:23
33

As muon suggested, you can install the deprecation package for this.

The deprecation library provides a deprecated decorator and a fail_if_not_removed decorator for your tests.

Installation

pip install deprecation

Example Usage

import deprecation

@deprecation.deprecated(deprecated_in="1.0", removed_in="2.0",
                        current_version=__version__,
                        details="Use the bar function instead")
def foo():
    """Do some stuff"""
    return 1

See http://deprecation.readthedocs.io/ for the full documentation.

2
  • 21
    doesn't answer the actual question.
    – Catskul
    May 2, 2019 at 16:43
  • 8
    Note PyCharm doesn't recognise this
    – c z
    Aug 23, 2019 at 10:55
28

A future Python version (after 3.13) will include the warnings.deprecated decorator which will indicate deprecations to type checkers like mypy.

As an example, consider this library stub named library.pyi:

from warnings import deprecated

@deprecated("Use Spam instead")
class Ham: ...

@deprecated("It is pining for the fiords")
def norwegian_blue(x: int) -> int: ...

@overload
@deprecated("Only str will be allowed")
def foo(x: int) -> str: ...
@overload
def foo(x: str) -> str: ...

Here is how type checkers should handle usage of this library:

from library import Ham  # error: Use of deprecated class Ham. Use Spam instead.

import library

library.norwegian_blue(1)  # error: Use of deprecated function norwegian_blue. It is pining for the fiords.
map(library.norwegian_blue, [1, 2, 3])  # error: Use of deprecated function norwegian_blue. It is pining for the fiords.

library.foo(1)  # error: Use of deprecated overload for foo. Only str will be allowed.
library.foo("x")  # no error

ham = Ham()  # no error (already reported above)

Source: PEP702

1
  • 8
    @Catskul, maybe this finally answers the question?
    – CervEd
    Aug 11, 2023 at 9:32
19

I guess the reason is that Python code can't be processed statically (as it done for C++ compilers), you can't get warning about using some things before actually using it. I don't think that it's a good idea to spam user of your script with a bunch of messages "Warning: this developer of this script is using deprecated API".

Update: but you can create decorator which will transform original function into another. New function will mark/check switch telling that this function was called already and will show message only on turning switch into on state. And/or at exit it may print list of all deprecated functions used in program.

2
  • 5
    And you should be able to indicate deprecation when the function is imported from the module. Decorator would be a right tool for that. Feb 21, 2013 at 9:23
  • @JanuszLenar, that warning will be show even if we don't use that deprecated function. But I guess I can update my answer with some hint.
    – ony
    Feb 21, 2013 at 11:37
18

You can create a utils file

import warnings

def deprecated(message):
  def deprecated_decorator(func):
      def deprecated_func(*args, **kwargs):
          warnings.warn("{} is a deprecated function. {}".format(func.__name__, message),
                        category=DeprecationWarning,
                        stacklevel=2)
          warnings.simplefilter('default', DeprecationWarning)
          return func(*args, **kwargs)
      return deprecated_func
  return deprecated_decorator

And then import the deprecation decorator as follows:

from .utils import deprecated

@deprecated("Use method yyy instead")
def some_method():
 pass
2
  • 1
    Thanks, I'm using this to send the user to the right place instead of just showing the deprecation message! Feb 5, 2018 at 22:03
  • 17
    doesn't answer the actual question.
    – Catskul
    May 2, 2019 at 16:42
0

Python is a dynamically typed language. Not necessary declare the type to variable or argument type for function statically.

Since its dynamic every thing if processed at runtime. Even if a method is deprecated it will be known at runtime or during interpretation only.

use deprecation module to deprecate methods.

deprecation is a library that enables automated deprecations. It offers the deprecated() decorator to wrap functions, providing proper warnings both in documentation and via Python’s warnings system, as well as the deprecation.fail_if_not_removed() decorator for test methods to ensure that deprecated code is eventually removed.

Installing :

python3.10 -m pip install deprecation

Small demonstration:

import deprecation

@deprecation.deprecated(details="Use bar instead")
def foo():
    print("Foo")


def bar():
    print("Bar")


foo()

bar()

Output:

test.py: DeprecatedWarning: foo is deprecated. Use bar instead
  foo()

Foo

Bar
1
  • Python is a dynamically-typed language, but it does have static typing through the typing module. This typing has no effect at runtime; it’s only used by static analysis tools such as mypy or editor integrations. I’m downvoting this answer because it suggests a solution that was explicitely mentioned as unsatisfying in the question body. Runtime warnings work, but they don’t tell mypy or your editor that this function is deprecated.
    – bfontaine
    Oct 19, 2023 at 17:01

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