I have a csv file ("SomeSiteValidURLs.csv") which listed all the links I need to scrape. The code is working and will go through the urls in the csv, scrape the information and record/save in another csv file ("Output.csv"). However, since I am planning to do it for a large portion of the site (for >10,000,000 pages), speed is important. For each link, it takes about 1s to crawl and save the info into the csv, which is too slow for the magnitude of the project. So I have incorporated the multithreading module and to my surprise it doesn't speed up at all, it still takes 1s person link. Did I do something wrong? Is there other way to speed up the processing speed?

Without multithreading:

import urllib2
import csv
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup
import threading

def crawlToCSV(FileName):

    with open(FileName, "rb") as f:
        for URLrecords in f:

            OpenSomeSiteURL = urllib2.urlopen(URLrecords)
            Soup_SomeSite = BeautifulSoup(OpenSomeSiteURL, "lxml")
            OpenSomeSiteURL.close()

            tbodyTags = Soup_SomeSite.find("tbody")
            trTags = tbodyTags.find_all("tr", class_="result-item ")

            placeHolder = []

            for trTag in trTags:
                tdTags = trTag.find("td", class_="result-value")
                tdTags_string = tdTags.string
                placeHolder.append(tdTags_string)

            with open("Output.csv", "ab") as f:
                writeFile = csv.writer(f)
                writeFile.writerow(placeHolder)

crawltoCSV("SomeSiteValidURLs.csv")

With multithreading:

import urllib2
import csv
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup
import threading

def crawlToCSV(FileName):

    with open(FileName, "rb") as f:
        for URLrecords in f:

            OpenSomeSiteURL = urllib2.urlopen(URLrecords)
            Soup_SomeSite = BeautifulSoup(OpenSomeSiteURL, "lxml")
            OpenSomeSiteURL.close()

            tbodyTags = Soup_SomeSite.find("tbody")
            trTags = tbodyTags.find_all("tr", class_="result-item ")

            placeHolder = []

            for trTag in trTags:
                tdTags = trTag.find("td", class_="result-value")
                tdTags_string = tdTags.string
                placeHolder.append(tdTags_string)

            with open("Output.csv", "ab") as f:
                writeFile = csv.writer(f)
                writeFile.writerow(placeHolder)

fileName = "SomeSiteValidURLs.csv"

if __name__ == "__main__":
    t = threading.Thread(target=crawlToCSV, args=(fileName, ))
    t.start()
    t.join()
  • You're probably I/O bound, in which case throwing more cores at the problem isn't going to help. – Robert Harvey Aug 18 '14 at 22:44
  • How can I check if it is the case? By the way, I forgot to mention I have actually tested to generate 50,000 random numbers, and with Multithread codes it's much faster than the codes without (which crashed at time). My computer is Intel Core i5 M460 @ 2.53GHz with 6GB of RAM, running, 64-bit Windows 7. – KubiK888 Aug 18 '14 at 23:04
  • You're just creating one thread, and having that one thread go through every URL. That's not going to speed things up at all; it's exactly the same as doing it with a single thread, except with the extra overhead of starting a second thread. – dano Aug 18 '14 at 23:05
  • Oh I didn't know that, I looked at the examples on the net and tried to implement the codes myself. Is there any simple example that depicts the creation of more than one threads? – KubiK888 Aug 18 '14 at 23:06
up vote 11 down vote accepted

You're not parallelizing this properly. What you actually want to do is have the work being done inside your for loop happen concurrently across many workers. Right now you're moving all the work into one background thread, which does the whole thing synchronously. That's not going to improve performance at all (it will just slightly hurt it, actually).

Here's an example that uses a ThreadPool to parallelize the network operation and parsing. It's not safe to try to write to the csv file across many threads at once, so instead we return the data that would have been written back to the parent, and have the parent write all the results to the file at the end.

import urllib2
import csv
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup
from multiprocessing.dummy import Pool  # This is a thread-based Pool
from multiprocessing import cpu_count

def crawlToCSV(URLrecord):
    OpenSomeSiteURL = urllib2.urlopen(URLrecord)
    Soup_SomeSite = BeautifulSoup(OpenSomeSiteURL, "lxml")
    OpenSomeSiteURL.close()

    tbodyTags = Soup_SomeSite.find("tbody")
    trTags = tbodyTags.find_all("tr", class_="result-item ")

    placeHolder = []

    for trTag in trTags:
        tdTags = trTag.find("td", class_="result-value")
        tdTags_string = tdTags.string
        placeHolder.append(tdTags_string)

    return placeHolder


if __name__ == "__main__":
    fileName = "SomeSiteValidURLs.csv"
    pool = Pool(cpu_count() * 2)  # Creates a Pool with cpu_count * 2 threads.
    with open(fileName, "rb") as f:
        results = pool.map(crawlToCSV, f)  # results is a list of all the placeHolder lists returned from each call to crawlToCSV
    with open("Output.csv", "ab") as f:
        writeFile = csv.writer(f)
        for result in results:
            writeFile.writerow(result)

Note that in Python, threads only actually speed up I/O operations - because of the GIL, CPU-bound operations (like the parsing/searching BeautifulSoup is doing) can't actually be done in parallel via threads, because only one thread can do CPU-based operations at a time. So you still may not see the speed up you were hoping for with this approach. When you need to speed up CPU-bound operations in Python, you need to use multiple processes instead of threads. Luckily, you can easily see how this script performs with multiple processes instead of multiple threads; just change from multiprocessing.dummy import Pool to from multiprocessing import Pool. No other changes are required.

Edit:

If you need to scale this up to a file with 10,000,000 lines, you're going to need to adjust this code a bit - Pool.map converts the iterable you pass into it to a list prior to sending it off to your workers, which obviously isn't going to work very well with a 10,000,000 entry list; having that whole thing in memory is probably going to bog down your system. Same issue with storing all the results in a list. Instead, you should use Pool.imap:

imap(func, iterable[, chunksize])

A lazier version of map().

The chunksize argument is the same as the one used by the map() method. For very long iterables using a large value for chunksize can make the job complete much faster than using the default value of 1.

if __name__ == "__main__":
    fileName = "SomeSiteValidURLs.csv"
    FILE_LINES = 10000000
    NUM_WORKERS = cpu_count() * 2
    chunksize = FILE_LINES // NUM_WORKERS * 4   # Try to get a good chunksize. You're probably going to have to tweak this, though. Try smaller and lower values and see how performance changes.
    pool = Pool(NUM_WORKERS)

    with open(fileName, "rb") as f:
        result_iter = pool.imap(crawlToCSV, f)
    with open("Output.csv", "ab") as f:
        writeFile = csv.writer(f)
        for result in result_iter:  # lazily iterate over results.
            writeFile.writerow(result)

With imap, we never put the all of f into memory at once, nor do we store all the results in memory at once. The most we ever have in memory is chunksize lines of f, which should be more manageable.

  • Thanks, I implemented your codes, and it's about 5 times faster. – KubiK888 Aug 19 '14 at 0:26
  • Hi Dano, if I can ask some follow-up questions. Does "pool = Pool(cpu_count() * 2)" specify how many threads to be run concurrently? I try to increase the number to 10, for example, didn't see any in crease in speed though. – KubiK888 Aug 19 '14 at 3:14
  • Secondly, I run the program twice, shouldn't I expect the order of the individual records be different in the final csv files? To clarify what I mean, in the "SomeSiteValidURLs.csv" file, say there are link#1, link#2, link#3... (in this order). I shouldn't be expecting the output in the "Output.csv" file will be the same order, right? For example, in the "Output.csv", I might see record#3, record#1, record#5... I do see matching order in my files which confuses me. – KubiK888 Aug 19 '14 at 3:15
  • 2
    @KubiK888 Yes, cpu_count() * 2 determines how many threads run concurrently. Increasing the number doesn't improve performance because adding more threads has diminishing returns - it is helpful to add more threads for speeding up I/O, but it will only slow you down for everything else the thread is doing, because only one can run at a time. When you have lots of threads running one at a time, the OS has to do a lot of context switching to give CPU time to each thread, which ends up being slower than just using fewer threads. You might even find that just using cpu_count is faster. – dano Aug 19 '14 at 4:19
  • @KubiK888 The result list returned map and imap is always ordered based on the iterable you passed into it. So the result returned by the first line in f will always be first in the result list, the second line will be second, etc. If order doesn't matter, I think your optimal performance could come from using imap_unordered with a good chunksize. That way, you can start writing the results to the csv file as soon as they're ready, rather than having to wait for them all to finish (with map), or waiting at times so that they're returned in the proper order (with imap). – dano Aug 19 '14 at 4:22

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