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I am currently working on a program, where there is a progress bar on the side. However I'm stumped on seeing if the users level (a double), is 10 - 100% complete. For example, if the goal is 10, I would like to display their percentage, but not like 39%, only every tenth of a number. Thanks, Export.

  • 1
    start with coding it.... – T McKeown Aug 19 '14 at 3:58
  • post your code here, or this question will be closed – Baby Aug 19 '14 at 4:03
  • Should the title be more like "Advancing a progress bar by 10% at a time"? – Concrete Gannet Aug 19 '14 at 4:25
0

Cast level to int.

Use / for integer division by 10, yielding 0, 1, 2 .. 10. Multiply by 10 to get 0, 10, 20 .. 100.

double level = ... ; // level is between 0.0 and 100.0 inclusive.

int progressBarValue = ((int)level / 10) * 10;

  • Now how would I check if the percentage? I got a general idea, if I can get an outcome of subtracting a percentage from a int System.out.println(100 - 10%) doesn't work. – MrExporting24 Aug 19 '14 at 4:11
  • You intend 100 itself to be a percentage, yes? So if you have a variable myPercentage holding a value 0, 10, 20, ... and you want to calculate the remaining percentage, it's just 100 - myPercentage. – Concrete Gannet Aug 19 '14 at 4:20
  • % is the modulus operator in Java. It is not a percentage. You build percentages by creating int variables that you know hold a percentage value. – Concrete Gannet Aug 19 '14 at 4:30
  • For some reason this code dosnt work, System.out.println((float)16*100/ 16);. The output is : 100 when the real percentage is 1, any ideas? – MrExporting24 Aug 19 '14 at 4:34
  • When you say the "real" percentage, I presume you have a variable that holds a number. You want to display a progress bar with a progress indicator based on the value in that variable. Your example code in the previous comment makes no use of any variable, just literal values of 16 and 100. If you take 100, multiply by 16 and then divide by 16, of course the result will be 100 (or close to that). Why did you choose 16 at all? – Concrete Gannet Aug 19 '14 at 23:45

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