7

I need to eval some code in Perl that might some times contain an exit() call in it. A very simplified example of this would be:

use strict;
use warnings;


eval "some_function()";
die $@ if $@;

print "Still alive!\n";


sub some_function {
    print "Hello from some_function\n";
    exit;
}

I never get to "Still alive!" because of the exit() call.

I tried setting some keys in %SIG (QUIT, STOP, TERM, BREAK, etc) but that didn't work. I also attempted to redefine CORE::exit with no success.

How can I prevent an exit() call from being effective when being evaled?

0
9

You can override exit, but you must do so at compile-time. So use a flag to signal whether the override is active or not.

our $override_exit = 0;
BEGIN { 
   *CORE::GLOBAL::exit = sub(;$) {
      die "EXIT_OVERRIDE\n" if $override_exit;
      CORE::exit($_[0] // 0);
   };
}

eval {
   local $override_exit = 1;
   some_function();
};

my $exit_was_called = $@ eq "EXIT_OVERRIDE\n";
die $@ if $@ && !$exit_was_called;

die("Exit called\n") if $exit_was_called;

But that creates an exception that might be caught unintentionally. So let's use last instead.

our $override_exit = 0;
BEGIN { 
   *CORE::GLOBAL::exit = sub(;$) {
      no warnings qw( exiting );
      last EXIT_OVERRIDE if $override_exit;
      CORE::exit($_[0] // 0);
   };
}

my $exit_was_called = 1;
EXIT_OVERRIDE: {
   local $override_exit = 1;
   eval { some_function() };
   die $@ if $@;
   $exit_was_called = 0;
}

die("Exit called\n") if $exit_was_called;

Note that eval BLOCK is used to catch exception. eval EXPR is used to compile code.

2
  • 1
    Very nice, thanks again. :-) So, if the evaled code explicitly calls CORE::exit, I guess I won't be able to stop that. Right? Aug 19 '14 at 17:19
  • 1
    You'd have to install an opcode checker to change the ppaddr of exit opcodes, I think.
    – ikegami
    Aug 25 '14 at 1:02
6

exit isn't meant to be trapped, so eval isn't the solution here. You could put the remaining code you need to run in an END block:

some_function();
END { print "Still alive! For now...\n"; }

sub some_function {
    print "Hello from some_function\n";
    exit;
}

But if you absolutely, positively need to prevent exit from killing the script, you'll have to redefine exit() at compile time:

BEGIN { *CORE::GLOBAL::exit = sub (;$) { } } # Make exit() do nothing
some_function();
print "Still alive!\n"; # Gets printed

*CORE::GLOBAL::exit = *CORE::exit; # Restore exit()
exit;
print "I'm dead here.\n"; # Doesn't get printed

sub some_function { exit }

The Test::Trap module from the CPAN can be used to encapsulate this bit of ugliness for you, if you're interested in a more robust solution. Personally I would locally patch the exiting some_function() to use croak instead, and maybe file a bug report with the patch if it's a module.

If you're just evaling user input and you don't want them to be able to call exit, verify that the string contains no calls to exit or to a subroutine that would indirectly exit, then eval it. Personally I'd be more afraid of unlink and fork than exit if the user is inputting arbitrary code to be evaluated.

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