2

I need to access a resource in a Windows 8.1 App shared by two processes: the app itself and a Background Task, so I need a named Semaphore, SemaphoreSlim does not apply there and as I do async work between acquisition and release I cannot use a Mutex.

I have created a class in a PCL that creates the Semaphore and allows me to await the WaitOne method this way:

public sealed class AsyncSemaphore:IDisposable
{
    Semaphore _semaphore;
    public AsyncSemaphore(int initialCount, int maximumCount, string name)
    {
        _semaphore = new Semaphore(initialCount, maximumCount, name);
    }

    public IAsyncOperation<bool> WaitOneAsync()
    {
        return AsyncInfo.Run<bool>(cancellationToken => 
            Task.Run(()=>{
                while (!_semaphore.WaitOne(100))
                {
                    Logger.Log("Waiting...");
                    cancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
                }
                return true;
            },cancellationToken));
    }

    public int Release()
    {
        return _semaphore.Release();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (_semaphore != null)
        {
            _semaphore.Dispose();
            _semaphore = null;
        }
    }
}

But WaitOneAsync can be written also like this:

public IAsyncOperation<bool> WaitOneAsync()
{
    return AsyncInfo.Run<bool>(async cancellationToken =>
        {
            while (!_semaphore.WaitOne(0))
            {
                Logger.Log("Waiting...");
                await Task.Delay(100, cancellationToken);
            }
            return true;
        });
}

Then I use it in my code like this:

_semaphore= new AsyncSemaphore(1,1,"uniquename");

//....

await _semaphore.WaitOneAsync();
try
{
   //do more async work
}
finally
{
   _semaphore.Release();
}

Is this correct? Which one is best and uses less resources?

  • What type is _semaphore if not SemaphoreSlim? – i3arnon Aug 19 '14 at 11:49
  • It is a System.Threading.Semaphore, so I can use a named semaphore. SemaphoreSlim does not allow to use a named one so it does not lock between two different processes, I add some code to clarify... – jmservera Aug 19 '14 at 11:52
  • 4
    No, that's not correct. WaitOne(100) does not have 100 msec worst-case behavior like your substitute does. – Hans Passant Aug 19 '14 at 12:02
  • @Hans good find! I didn't notice this when I wrote the second option. Thank you. – jmservera Aug 19 '14 at 12:10
  • 1
    @jmservera: On the full desktop framework, you can use ThreadPool.RegisterWaitForSingleObject. However, on Win8 you do need to either block a thread pool thread or poll. Of those two, I would choose to block the thread pool thread. – Stephen Cleary Aug 19 '14 at 12:58
2

The first option holds a thread throughout the entire wait, first by synchronously waiting and then by busy waiting (the while loop). The second option is at least somewhat asynchronous as it uses Task.Delay to wait and only then resorts to busy waiting.

The second (async) option uses less resources, but needs to wait out the entire timeout (100ms) before checking again while the first (sync) can enter the semaphore immediately when it's released.

The async option uses less resources than the sync version but the actual synchronization is slower than in the sync version. So it comes down to what are your specific needs, scalability or speed.


You can optimize by lowering the timeout from 100ms and so bring the async option closer and closer to the sync version.

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.