267

I'm trying to figure out how to match a String in Rust.

I initially tried matching like this, but I figured out Rust cannot implicitly cast from std::string::String to &str.

fn main() {
    let stringthing = String::from("c");
    match stringthing {
        "a" => println!("0"),
        "b" => println!("1"),
        "c" => println!("2"),
    }
}

This has the error:

error[E0308]: mismatched types
 --> src/main.rs:4:9
  |
4 |         "a" => println!("0"),
  |         ^^^ expected struct `std::string::String`, found reference
  |
  = note: expected type `std::string::String`
             found type `&'static str`

I then tried to construct new String objects, as I could not find a function to cast a String to a &str.

fn main() {
    let stringthing = String::from("c");
    match stringthing {
        String::from("a") => println!("0"),
        String::from("b") => println!("1"),
        String::from("c") => println!("2"),
    }
}

This gave me the following error 3 times:

error[E0164]: `String::from` does not name a tuple variant or a tuple struct
 --> src/main.rs:4:9
  |
4 |         String::from("a") => return 0,
  |         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ not a tuple variant or struct

How to actually match Strings in Rust?

2
  • 3
    stringthing.as_str() is probably the most straightforward of all the answers; I don't like as_ref because it's unnecessarily general, which can lead to bugs, and not as explicit, it isn't completely clear that as_ref() is going to be a &str, as_str is simple and clear. – Zorf Jan 10 '20 at 21:00
  • @Zorf You are right. The answer was accepted when as_str did not exist yet. I changed the accepted answer but thank all people who answered this question! – Jeroen Jan 10 '20 at 21:04
140

You can do something like this:

match &stringthing[..] {
    "a" => println!("0"),
    "b" => println!("1"),
    "c" => println!("2"),
    _ => println!("something else!"),
}

There's also an as_str method as of Rust 1.7.0:

match stringthing.as_str() {
    "a" => println!("0"),
    "b" => println!("1"),
    "c" => println!("2"),
    _ => println!("something else!"),
}
0
209

as_slice is deprecated, you should now use the trait std::convert::AsRef instead:

match stringthing.as_ref() {
    "a" => println!("0"),
    "b" => println!("1"),
    "c" => println!("2"),
    _ => println!("something else!"),
}

Note that you also have to explicitly handle the catch-all case.

4
  • 3
    using rust 1.4.0 one can use the trim() function. Just using as_ref() doesn't match the string. – futtetennista Dec 1 '15 at 20:17
  • 1
    I think the match fails because of whitespace that trim() removes. This is nice for deferencing to match against user input. – Gerard Sexton Sep 20 '16 at 13:25
  • 1
    It doesn't work. It can only match _ if I get String from read_line. – Masked Man Nov 26 '16 at 10:20
  • Don't know much about how rust manages different types of strings, but it seems to work on a basic example. – tforgione Jan 24 '18 at 9:40
18

You could also do

match &stringthing as &str {
    "a" => println!("0"),
    "b" => println!("1"),
    "c" => println!("2"),
    _ => println!("something else!"),
}

See:

9

Editor's note: This answer pertains to an version of Rust before 1.0 and does not work in Rust 1.0

You can match on a string slice.

match stringthing.as_slice() {
    "a" => println!("0"),
    "b" => println!("1"),
    "c" => println!("2"),
    _ => println!("something else!"),
}
1
  • better to use .as_ref() or .as_str(), both did not take ownership. – Abrar Khan Dec 8 '19 at 16:00
0

You can try:

fn main() {
    let stringthing = String::from("c");
    match &*stringthing {
        "a" => println!("0"),
        "b" => println!("1"),
        "c" => println!("2"),
        _ => println!("else")
    }
}
1
  • 7
    It might improve the usefulness of your answer if you explain what &*stringthing means and does. – Seth Difley May 3 '20 at 15:53
0

You can convert the String into &str by doing this:

fn main() {
let stringthing = String::from("c");
match &stringthing[..] {
    "a" => println!("0"),
    "b" => println!("1"),
    "c" => println!("2"),
}

}

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