2

First, here is the example straight from Learning Perl (p.29)

# Append a space to $str
$str  = $str . " ";

# The same thing with an assignment operator
$str .= " ";

Are either of these method more "correct" or preferred for speed or syntactical reasons?

4
  • 1
    I have no idea if the perl interpreter is smart enough to see that the first way is like the second. But in my opinion, the second way is better (at least for a semantical reason since it means add this string at the end). If one of the two method is faster, this is probably the second. – Casimir et Hippolyte Aug 19 '14 at 16:14
  • 3
    @CasimiretHippolyte and it is faster to type too! – jaypal singh Aug 19 '14 at 16:25
  • 1
    It also avoids typo on variable name. – Toto Aug 19 '14 at 17:18
  • I agree @CasimiretHippolyte, I would definitely prefer to maintain the second due to aesthetic reasons. Thank you everyone! – Nicholas Anderson Aug 19 '14 at 19:43
5

Looking at the Concise output for each option:

perl -MO=Concise,-exec -e 'my $str = "a"; $str  = $str . " ";'
1  <0> enter
2  <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{
3  <$> const[PV "a"] s
4  <0> padsv[$str:1,2] sRM*/LVINTRO
5  <2> sassign vKS/2
6  <;> nextstate(main 2 -e:1) v:{
7  <0> padsv[$str:1,2] s
8  <$> const[PV " "] s
9  <2> concat[$str:1,2] sK/TARGMY,2
a  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC
-e syntax OK
perl -MO=Concise,-exec -e 'my $str = "a"; $str .= " ";'
1  <0> enter
2  <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{
3  <$> const[PV "a"] s
4  <0> padsv[$str:1,2] sRM*/LVINTRO
5  <2> sassign vKS/2
6  <;> nextstate(main 2 -e:1) v:{
7  <0> padsv[$str:1,2] sRM
8  <$> const[PV " "] s
9  <2> concat[t2] vKS/2
a  <@> leave[1 ref] vKP/REFC
-e syntax OK

While they are slightly different (.= does concatenation in a void context, and the other in scalar) the main reason to choose one or the other is style/maintainability. I prefer to write:

$str .= " ";

Mainly for ease of typing and because it's obvious you're appending to the end of string without having to check the variable on the RHS is the same as on the LHS.

Essentially: Use whichever you prefer!

1
  • Preference certainly comes into play here. However, I do believe that your main point is that it's clearly appending to the end of the string without having to check the variable gives the second option a leg up. But again, just my observation/preference. Thanks! – Nicholas Anderson Aug 19 '14 at 19:45

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