I am trying to deserialize derived type, and I want to use a custom property Type to distinguish between derived types.

[
  {
    "Type": "a",
    "Height": 100
  },
  {
    "Type": "b",
    "Name": "Joe"
  }
]

The solution I came to was to create a custom JsonConverter. On ReadJson I read the Type property and instantiate that type through the ToObject<T> function. Everything works fine until I use a JsonConverterAttribute. The ReadJson method loops infinitely because the attribute is applied on subtypes too.

How do I prevent this attribute from being applied to the subtypes?

[JsonConverter(typeof(TypeSerializer))]
public abstract class Base
{
    private readonly string type;

    public Base(string type)
    {
        this.type = type;
    }

    public string Type { get { return type; } }
}

public class AType : Base
{
    private readonly int height;

    public AType(int height)
        : base("a")
    {
        this.height = height;
    }

    public int Height { get { return height; } }
}

public class BType : Base
{
    private readonly string name;

    public BType(string name)
        : base("b")
    {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public string Name { get { return name; } }
}

public class TypeSerializer : JsonConverter
{
    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
    {
        return objectType == typeof(Base);
    }

    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        serializer.Serialize(writer, value);
    }

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        var j = JObject.Load(reader);

        var type = j["Type"].ToObject<string>();

        if (type == "a")
            // Infinite Loop! StackOverflowException
            return j.ToObject<AType>(); 
        if (type == "b")
            return j.ToObject<BType>();

        throw new NotImplementedException(type);
    }
}

[TestFixture]
public class InheritanceSerializeTests
{
    [Test]
    public void Deserialize()
    {
        var json = @"{""Type"":""a"", ""Height"":100}";
        JObject.Parse(json).ToObject<Base>(); // Crash
    }
}

I had a very similar problem with a project that I am currently working on: I wanted to make a custom JsonConverter and map it to my entities via attributes, but then the code got trapped in an infinite loop.

What did the trick in my case was using serializer.Populate instead of JObject.ToObject (I couldn't use .ToObject even if I wanted to; I am using version 3.5.8, in which this function does not exist). Below is my ReadJson method as an example:

public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
{
    JContainer lJContainer = default(JContainer);

    if (reader.TokenType == JsonToken.StartObject)
    {
        lJContainer = JObject.Load(reader);
        existingValue = Convert.ChangeType(existingValue, objectType);
        existingValue = Activator.CreateInstance(objectType);

        serializer.Populate(lJContainer.CreateReader(), existingValue);
    }

    return existingValue;
}
  • Even if it is an old answer, it still does the trick on NewtonSoft 10 ;) The problem is still present. And I couldn't find any other solutions. – André Feb 17 at 19:16
  • This one is great, the most decent simple solution I have found. – Curly Brace Jul 5 at 14:34

Remove the [JsonConverter(typeof(TypeSerializer))] attribute from the Base class and in the Deserialize test replace the following line:

JObject.Parse(json).ToObject<Base>(); // Crash

with this one:

var obj = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Base>(json, new TypeSerializer());

UPDATE 1 This update matches the comment from the asker of the question:

Leave the [JsonConverter(typeof(TypeSerializer))] attribute to the Base class. Use the following line for deserialization:

var obj = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Base>(json);

and modify the ReadJson method like this:

public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
{
    var j = JObject.Load(reader);

    if (j["Type"].ToString() == "a")
        return new AType(int.Parse(j["Height"].ToString()));

    return new BType(j["Name"].ToString());
}
  • 1
    Yes, it works fine, but I want to use the attribute. The attribute is more convenient, it's declared once over the type, no need to search for the serializer every time. – mipi Aug 20 '14 at 13:26
  • @mipi Does the update work for you? – Ilija Dimov Aug 20 '14 at 15:08
  • Not really Ilija. You see, I have a lot of objects actually with heavy constructors because of immutable types I use. And I like how Json.NET creates these types using these constructors. But as I understand, I cannot use this default instantiator without getting into this infinite loop... It seems I have to create my custom solution for this or just use the DeserializeObject<Base>(json, new TypeSerializer()) – mipi Aug 21 '14 at 5:35

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