8

This is a language lawyer question, not a good practice question.

Is the following code valid or undefined behaviour? A const object ends up calling a non-const function, but it doesn't actually modify the state of the object.

struct Bob
{
    Bob() : a(0) {}

    int& GetA()
    {
        return a;
    }

    const int& GetA() const
    {
        return const_cast<Bob&>(*this).GetA();
    }

    int a;
};

int main()
{
    const Bob b;
    int a = b.GetA();
}
13
  • This is, IMO, one of the few legitimate uses for const_cast (but I don't have a standard quote handy to prove it's allowed).
    – dlf
    Aug 20, 2014 at 14:08
  • 1
    @JoachimPileborg Here no, but if the nonconst GetA() was doing nontrivial work, this could save repeating that code in the const version.
    – dlf
    Aug 20, 2014 at 14:10
  • 5
    FWIW, in Effective C++, Scott Meyers suggested the opposite. In the non-const version, return const_cast<int &>(static_cast<const Bob &>(*this).GetA());
    – chris
    Aug 20, 2014 at 14:13
  • 4
    Doing it the other way like Scott Meyers suggest (according to @chris) might be a safer alternative, because one would know that the constant version of the function would not modify this, while there is no such guarantee with the non-constant function. A little mistake in the non-constant GetA and you will have UB. Aug 20, 2014 at 14:16
  • 1
    @JoachimPileborg Of course, that one fails when the const version returns a reference to something that is actually declared const. Aug 20, 2014 at 14:32

2 Answers 2

9

The behavior is well-defined :

C++ standard, section § 5.2.11/7 [const cast]

[ Note: Depending on the type of the object, a write operation through the pointer, lvalue or pointer to data member resulting from a const_cast that casts away a const-qualifier may produce undefined behavior. —end note ]

GetA() does not write any member of Bob, so this program does not involve undefined behavior.

0
4

I believe it is well-defined, since the standard only ascribes undefined behaviour to modifying a const object. C++11 quotes follow:

[expr.const.cast] 5.2.11 §7

[ Note: Depending on the type of the object, a write operation through the pointer, lvalue or pointer to data member resulting from a const_cast that casts away a const-qualifier may produce undefined behavior (7.1.6.1). —end note ]

[dcl.type.cv] 7.1.6.1 §4

Except that any class member declared mutable (7.1.1) can be modified, any attempt to modify a const object during its lifetime (3.8) results in undefined behavior. ...

GetA() does not actually modify any object, so it doesn't have undefined behaviour.

1
  • 1
    (note that GetA() could modify some objects and be well-defined, as long as no data members are involved)
    – quantdev
    Aug 20, 2014 at 14:14

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