6

Is there any way to list files from a folder?

Something like:

select * from pg_ls_dir('/home/christian')

I tried pg_ls_dir but, per documentation:

Only files within the database cluster directory and the log_directory can be accessed. Use a relative path for files in the cluster directory, and a path matching the log_directory configuration setting for log files. Use of these functions is restricted to superusers.

I need to list files from a folder outside the postgres directories, similar to how it's done with COPY.

  • it should work as in your example, however, the postgres user usually doesn't have the rights to do so. – MrTux Aug 20 '14 at 19:55
  • postres user has the rights to do it. I can use "COPY" command to bulk any file inside that folder. As I saw in postgres' source code, there are restrictions in that function to not allow list anything outside postgres tree folders. – Christian Aug 20 '14 at 20:52
  • @Christian: I suggest to edit the additional important information into the question. People tend to downvote / close questions without any explanation. – Erwin Brandstetter Aug 20 '14 at 21:54
5

It's normally not useful for a SQL client.

Anyway should you need to implement it, that's a typical use case for a script language like plperlu. Example:

CREATE FUNCTION nosecurity_ls(text) RETURNS setof text AS $$
  opendir(my $d, $_[0]) or die $!;
  while (my $f=readdir($d)) {
    return_next($f);
  }
  return undef; 
$$ language plperlu;

That's equivalent to the pg_ls_dir(text) function mentioned in System Administration Functions except for the restrictions.


  => select * from nosecurity_ls('/var/lib/postgresql/9.1/main') as ls;
      ls      
-----------------
 pg_subtrans
 pg_serial
 pg_notify
 pg_clog
 pg_multixact
 ..
 base
 pg_twophase
 etc...
9

Using PostgreSQL 9.3, it is possible to avoid the overhead of installing a language extension:

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS files;
CREATE TABLE files(filename text);
COPY files FROM PROGRAM 'find /usr/bin -maxdepth 1 -type f -printf "%f\n"'; 
SELECT * FROM files ORDER BY filename ASC;

Creates a table with 2,000+ rows in 81 msec on my machine, from [ to zip.

Normally the COPY command requires superuser privileges. Since the path to the file system is hard-coded (i.e., not an unsanitized value from users), it doesn't pose a great security risk to define the function first using a superuser account (e.g., postgres) as follows:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION files()
  RETURNS SETOF text AS
$BODY$
BEGIN
  SET client_min_messages TO WARNING;
  DROP TABLE IF EXISTS files;
  CREATE TEMP TABLE files(filename text);
  COPY files FROM PROGRAM 'find /usr/bin -maxdepth 1 -type f -printf "%f\n"';
  RETURN QUERY SELECT * FROM files ORDER BY filename ASC;
END;
$BODY$
  LANGUAGE plpgsql SECURITY DEFINER;

Log into PostgreSQL using a non-superuser account, then:

SELECT * FROM files();

The same list of results should be returned without any security violation errors.


The SECURITY DEFINER tells PostgreSQL to run the function under the role of the account that was used to create the function. Since it was created using a superuser role, it will execute with superuser permissions, regardless of the role that executes the command.

The SET client_min_messages TO WARNING; tells PostgreSQL to suppress messages if the table cannot be dropped. It's okay to delete this line.

The CREATE TEMP TABLE is used to create a table that does not need to persist over time. If you need a permanent table, remove the TEMP modifier.

The 'find...' command, which could also be /usr/bin/find, lists only files (type -f) and displays only the filename without the leading path separated one filename per line (-printf "%f\n"). Finally, -maxdepth 1 limits the file search to only the specified directory without searching any subdirectories. See find's man page for details.


One disadvantage to this approach is that there doesn't seem to be a way to parameterize the command to execute. It seems that PostgreSQL requires it to be a text string, rather than an expression statement. Perhaps this is for the best as it prevents allowing arbitrary commands to be executed. What you see is what you execute.

5

Extended version of this answer, function ls_files_extended:

-- Unfortunately that variant only allow use hardcoded path
-- To use user parameter we will use dynamic EXECUTE.
-- Return also file size and allow filtering
--
-- @param path text. Filesystem path for read to
-- @param filter text (default null meaning return all). Where condition to filter files. F.e.: $$filename LIKE '0%'$$
-- @param sort text (default filename).
--
-- Examples of use:
-- 1) Simple call, return all files, sort by filename:
-- SELECT * FROM ls_files_extended('/pg_xlog.archive')
-- 2) Return all, sort by filesize:
-- SELECT * FROM ls_files_extended('/pg_xlog.archive', null, 'size ASC')
-- 3) Use filtering and sorting:
-- SELECT * FROM ls_files_extended('/pg_xlog.archive', 'filename LIKE ''0%''', 'size ASC')
-- or use $-quoting for easy readability:
-- SELECT * FROM ls_files_extended('/pg_xlog.archive', $$filename LIKE '0%'$$, 'size ASC')
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION ls_files_extended(path text, filter text default null, sort text default 'filename')
    RETURNS TABLE(filename text, size bigint) AS
$BODY$
BEGIN
  SET client_min_messages TO WARNING;
  CREATE TEMP TABLE _files(filename text, size bigint) ON COMMIT DROP;

  EXECUTE format($$COPY _files FROM PROGRAM 'find %s -maxdepth 1 -type f -printf "%%f\t%%s\n"'$$, path);

  RETURN QUERY EXECUTE format($$SELECT * FROM _files WHERE %s ORDER BY %s $$, concat_ws(' AND ', 'true', filter), sort);
END;
$BODY$ LANGUAGE plpgsql SECURITY DEFINER;

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