15

We have this anonymous function in our code, which is part of the jQuery's Ajax object parameters and which uses some variables from the function it is called from.

this.invoke = function(method, data, callback, error, bare) {
      $.ajax({
        success: function(res) {
            if (!callback) return;

            var result = "";
            if (res != null && res.length != 0)
                var result = JSON2.parse(res);

            if (bare)
            { callback(result); return; }

            for (var property in result) {
                callback(result[property]);
                break;
            }
        }
   });
}

I have omitted the extra code, but you get the idea. The code works perfectly fine, but it leaks 4 Kbs on each call in IE, so I want to refactor it to turn the anonymous function into a named one, like this.onSuccess = function(res) { .. }.

The problem is that this function uses variables from this.invoke(..), so I cannot just take it outside of its body. How do I correctly refactor this code, so that it does not use anonymous functions and parent function variables?

Update. I am thinking of creating a separate object, initializing it with the same parameters, and pass its onSuccess function as a parameter for jQuery's Ajax object. Although I suspect that it will still leak memory.

Update 2. I have found a few links suggesting that the actual leak might be caused by jQuery. Simple jQuery Ajax call leaks memory in Internet Explorer Memory leak involving jQuery Ajax requests

Still it was good to find a way to refactor this.

Update 3. I will wait for a more generic solution, before accepting an answer.

2
  • How do you know that this is actually leaking, versus not being collected immediately? IE's leaks tend to be around circular references between DOM elements and event handlers, neither of which are obviously present here.
    – Ben Zotto
    Mar 30 '10 at 1:01
  • IE also leaks on closures, which is what we have here. I have debugged the above code and from my knowledge this is one of the parts where the leakage occurs, as the callback leaks nothing. (To be fair all browser leak on this code). Mar 30 '10 at 1:03
11

You can add extra params to the ajax request that can be accessed in the success callback:

this.invoke = function(method, data, callback, error, bare) {
    $.ajax({
        success: onSuccess,
        invokedata: {
         callback: callback,
         bare: bare
        }
    });
};

var onSuccess = function(res) {
    var callback = this.invokedata.callback,
        bare = this.invokedata.bare;
    if (!callback) return;

    var result = "";
    if (res != null && res.length != 0)
        var result = JSON2.parse(res);

    if (bare){
        callback(result); 
        return;
    }

    for (var property in result) {
        callback(result[property]);
        break;
    }
}
5
  • Didn't know you could do that, thanks. I'll check to see if there is still a leak. Mar 30 '10 at 1:42
  • how is res getting passed to onSuccess?
    – plodder
    Mar 30 '10 at 1:44
  • @Angus res is the data returned from the request Mar 30 '10 at 1:54
  • ok thanks - I'm still unclear as to why IE is holding on to to the anonymous function. Sure the function refs some parent objects - but there should be no circular reference here - so I thought that tracking references top down from the window should not reach this function
    – plodder
    Mar 30 '10 at 1:56
  • @Angus Croll, See my update. The ajax call itself leaks, not the anonymous function in this case. Mar 30 '10 at 2:14
4

+1 for excellent, excellent question - I feel your pain - this is really nicely factored as it is.

One suggestion (and maybe this is what you meant by your update)...define a wrapper for onSuccess and make it return the function you want to assign. Then call the outer function and assign it to the "success" option, passing the values it needs. Those values will be pre-assigned to the variables in the inner function. Not actually sure if this will help - you still end up with an anonymous function - but worth a try

this.invoke = function(method, data, callback, error, bare) {
    $.ajax({
        success: onSuccess(callback, bare);
    });
};

var onSuccess = function(callback, bare) {
     return function() {
        if (!callback) return;

        var result = "";
        if (res != null && res.length != 0)
            var result = JSON2.parse(res);

        if (bare)
        { callback(result); return; }

        for (var property in result) {
            callback(result[property]);
            break;
        }
     }
}
2
  • 2
    This is a good way from a programming point of view, but it doesn't sort the leakage problem, as your anonymous function in return statement still references variables of the parent function. Mar 30 '10 at 1:25
  • OK..as I feared. If its really the creation of anonymous functions after each ajax call that causes the memory leak then you are in a pickle. Not sure whats preventing garbage collection here - have you tried physically deleting the function when you are done with it?
    – plodder
    Mar 30 '10 at 1:32

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