I'm currently building a role for installing PHP using ansible, and I'm having some difficulty merging dictionaries. I've tried several ways to do so, but I can't get it to work like I want it to:

# A vars file:
my_default_values:
  key = value

my_values:
  my_key = my_value


# In a playbook, I create a task to attempt merging the
# two dictionaries (which doesn't work):

- debug: msg="{{ item.key }} = {{ item.value }}"
  with_dict: my_default_values + my_values

# I have also tried:

- debug: msg="{{ item.key }} = {{ item.value }}"
  with_dict: my_default_values|union(my_values)

# I have /some/ success with using j2's update,
# but you can't use j2 syntax in "with_dict", it appears.
# This works:

- debug: msg="{{ my_default_values.update(my_values) }}"

# But this doesn't:

- debug: msg="{{ item.key }} = {{ item.value }}"
  with_dict: my_default_values.update(my_values)

Is there a way to merge two dictionaries, so I can use it with "with_dict"?

up vote 59 down vote accepted

In Ansible 2.0, there is a Jinja filter, combine, for this:

- debug: msg="{{ item.key }} = {{ item.value }}"
  with_dict: "{{ my_default_values | combine(my_values) }}"

If you want hash merging I would turn the hash merging feature on in ansible. In your ansible config file turn hash merging on.

With hash_behaviour=merge you can have two var files with the same variable name:

defaults.yml:

values:
  key: value

overrides.yml:

values:
  my_key: my_value

In order for the two vars to be merged you will need to include both var files:

ansible-playbook some-play.yml ... -e@defaults.yml  -e@overrides.yml

And you will end up with this:

TASK: [debug var=values] ********************************************************
ok: [localhost] => {
    "values": {
        "key": value,
        "my_key": my_value
    }
}

Calling update on a variable can be done in Jinja but in general it will be messy, I wouldn't do it outside of your templates and even then try to avoid it altogether.

  • 5
    Changing this setting may break other roles. Try jinja2 combine method instead. – kalu Mar 11 '16 at 18:37
  • 2
    Following on what @kalu said - Using hash merging is dangerous discouraged. – Ory Band May 1 '16 at 9:06

It is now possible to use the anchor and extend features of YAML:

---
- hosts: localhost
  vars:
    my_default_values: &def
      key: value
    my_values:
      <<: *def
      my_key: my_value
  tasks:
    - debug: var=my_default_values
    - debug: var=my_values

Result:

TASK [debug]
ok: [localhost] => {
    "my_default_values": {
        "key": "value"
    }
}

TASK [debug] 
ok: [localhost] => {
    "my_values": {
        "key": "value", 
        "my_key": "my_value"
    }
}

I have no idea why this was not mentioned before.

  • 2
    That's pretty cool! While this can accomplish the task, I think the issue is that you need to decorate all the source objects with the "&name", which could be overly burdensome. This can be an issue if you are using a shared role, where the role (and original variable object) is maintained by someone else. Also, I haven't tested it, but it seems like there COULD be runtime issues with it, where the evaluation happens on file load, wheres a Jinja template solution might happen at the expected time, especially if there is a "when" modifier. Any thoughts on eval time between this and combine()? – Harmon Apr 25 '17 at 14:45

If you need the merged dictionary a few times, you can set it to a new "variable":

- set_fact: _my_values="{{ my_default_values|combine(my_values) }}"

- debug: msg="{{ item.key }} = {{ item.value }}"
  with_dict: _my_values

Try this role from Ansible Galaxy.

I did it some time ago for same reason. It can deep merge dictionaries from several vars files and set custom precedence of merging.

This role can work under Ansible 2.0+

>>> key = 'default key'
>>> value = 'default value'
>>> my_key = 'my key'
>>> my_value = 'my value'
>>>
>>> my_default_values = {key: value}
>>> print my_default_values
{'default key': 'default value'}
>>>
>>> my_values = {my_key: my_value}
>>> print my_values
{'my key': 'my value'}
>>>
>>> with_dict = my_default_value.copy()
>>> print with_dict
{'default key': 'default value'}
>>> with_dict.update(my_values)
>>> print with_dict
{'default key': 'default value', 'my key': 'my value'}
  • 1
    Right, that's what I was using in my last example. That doesn't work in ansible, or so it seems. – Berry Langerak Aug 21 '14 at 11:11

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.