3

How do I get wildcard text searches (like SQL's "like" statement) in ASP.net MVC using the edo entity framework?

I assumed this would work:

var elig = (from e in _documentDataModel.Protocol_Eligibility_View
            where e.criteria.Contains(query)
            select e);

But it returns no results even when searching for a query string that's definitely in the database. What am I doing wrong?

8

This guy made a very nice "WhereLike" extension for Linq that accepts any wildcard character and compares two values (one of which comes from an expression) with a generic method derived from the location of the wildcard.

  • x% -> startswith
  • %x -> endswith
  • %x% -> contains

http://trentacular.com/2010/08/linq-to-entities-wild-card-like-extension-method/

EDIT: The article seems to be down. I will paste the extention code below:

public static class LinqHelper
    {
        //Support IQueryable (Linq to Entities)
        public static IQueryable<TSource> WhereLike<TSource>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, Expression<Func<TSource, string>> valueSelector, string value, char wildcard)
        {
            return source.Where(BuildLikeExpression(valueSelector, value, wildcard));
        }

        //Support IEnumerable (Linq to objects)
        public static IEnumerable<TSource> WhereLike<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> sequence, Func<TSource, string> expression, string value, char wildcard)
        {
            var regEx = WildcardToRegex(value, wildcard);

            //Prevent multiple enumeration:
            var arraySequence = sequence as TSource[] ?? sequence.ToArray();

            try
            {
                return arraySequence.Where(item => Regex.IsMatch(expression(item), regEx));
            }
            catch (ArgumentNullException)
            {
                return arraySequence;
            }
        }

        //Used for the IEnumerable support
        private static string WildcardToRegex(string value, char wildcard)
        {
            return "(?i:^" + Regex.Escape(value).Replace("\\" + wildcard, "." + wildcard) + "$)";
        }

        //Used for the IQueryable support
        private static Expression<Func<TElement, bool>> BuildLikeExpression<TElement>(Expression<Func<TElement, string>> valueSelector, string value, char wildcard)
        {
            if (valueSelector == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("valueSelector");

            var method = GetLikeMethod(value, wildcard);

            value = value.Trim(wildcard);
            var body = Expression.Call(valueSelector.Body, method, Expression.Constant(value));

            var parameter = valueSelector.Parameters.Single();
            return Expression.Lambda<Func<TElement, bool>>(body, parameter);
        }

        private static MethodInfo GetLikeMethod(string value, char wildcard)
        {
            var methodName = "Equals";

            var textLength = value.Length;
            value = value.TrimEnd(wildcard);
            if (textLength > value.Length)
            {
                methodName = "StartsWith";
                textLength = value.Length;
            }

            value = value.TrimStart(wildcard);
            if (textLength > value.Length)
            {
                methodName = (methodName == "StartsWith") ? "Contains" : "EndsWith";
            }

            var stringType = typeof(string);
            return stringType.GetMethod(methodName, new[] { stringType });
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    unfortunately, this link provided in the answer is dead. Thank you for providing with the code. – Pac0 Feb 10 '17 at 8:52
  • how to use the extension method? – Velkumar Feb 21 '17 at 8:04
  • On any of your IQueryable or IEnumerable you invoke it, like so: IQueryableVar.WhereLike(item => item.property, textbox.Text, '*'); where textbox.Text is an example on what you would like the property to be like. – Jon Koeter Feb 21 '17 at 11:55
  • Thank you Jon, what does the third parameter '*' is doing? – Velkumar Feb 21 '17 at 14:23
  • As you can see it's passed all the way down to the method "GetLikeMethod" where it is used to determine wether to use StartsWith, EndsWith or Contains. So if your value would be "bla* ", which could mean you need everything starting with "bla", you pass the * char along with the wildcard parameter and expect the method to return "Startswith("bla")". – Jon Koeter Feb 22 '17 at 17:02
5

String.Contains should work appropriately. SQL's LIKE statement is typically handled via String.StartsWith, String.Contains, or String.EndsWith.

However, it is possible you're having casing issues. You could try:

var elig = (from e in _documentDataModel.Protocol_Eligibility_View
        where e.criteria.ToLower().Contains(query.ToLower())
        select e);
| improve this answer | |
  • Upon looking at my issue more closely, it looks like my issue is somewhere else, not in the .contains statement. – sslepian Mar 30 '10 at 2:12
5

Linq to entities does not support the SqlMethods method, but you could use the string functions instead:

.Where(entity => entity.Name.Contains("xyz"))

.Where(entity => entity.Name.EndsWith("xyz"))

.Where(entity => entity.Name.StartsWith("xyz"))
| improve this answer | |
5

2019 update

For Entity Framework 6.2 you can use DBFunctions

For example:

try
{
    using (var db = new YOUREntities())
    {
        var data = db.LenderProgram.Where(i => DbFunctions.Like(i.LenderProgramCode, "OTO%"))
            .ToList();
        return data;
    }
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    e.HandleException();
}
| improve this answer | |
3

The System.Data.Linq.SqlClient namespace contains the SqlMethods class. You can use it's Like method like this:

var elig = from e in _documentDataModel.Protocol_Eligibility_View
           where SqlMethods.Like(e.criteria, query)
           select e;
| improve this answer | |
2

I started using the code that Jon Koeter posted from the blog post in another answer that no longer appears to exist.

However, I found it didn't really work properly, especially when using an IEnumerable. Namely, it was resolving the enumerable using ToArray and using a regex to match, rather than the built in functions.

Since I only want to resolve my IEnumerable once I have finished filtering, I made some changes to convert to an IQueryable then use the rest of the code to find the correct Entity Framework method and call that. This way, the query itself is not called against the database until later, and it avoids the use of a regex.

public static IQueryable<T> WhereLike<T>(this IQueryable<T> source, Expression<Func<T, string>> valueSelector, string value, char wildcard)
{
    return source.Where(BuildLikeExpression(valueSelector, value, wildcard));
}

public static IEnumerable<T> WhereLike<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Expression<Func<T, string>> valueSelector, string value, char wildcard)
{
    return source.AsQueryable().WhereLike(valueSelector, value, wildcard);
}

private static Expression<Func<T, bool>> BuildLikeExpression<T>(Expression<Func<T, string>> valueSelector, string value, char wildcard)
{
    if (valueSelector == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("valueSelector");

    var method = GetLikeMethod(value, wildcard);
    value = value.Trim(wildcard);
    var body = Expression.Call(valueSelector.Body, method, Expression.Constant(value));
    var parameter = valueSelector.Parameters.Single();
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(body, parameter);
}

private static MethodInfo GetLikeMethod(string value, char wildcard)
{
    var methodName = "Equals";

    var textLength = value.Length;
    value = value.TrimEnd(wildcard);
    if (textLength > value.Length)
    {
        methodName = "StartsWith";
        textLength = value.Length;
    }

    value = value.TrimStart(wildcard);
    if (textLength > value.Length)
    {
        methodName = (methodName == "StartsWith") ? "Contains" : "EndsWith";
    }

    var stringType = typeof(string);
    return stringType.GetMethod(methodName, new[] { stringType });
}

Usage:

// example data set
var data = new List<Person> {
    new Person{FirstName="John", LastName="Smith"}, 
    new Person{FirstName="Jane", LastName="Doe"}
};

data.WhereLike(x=>x.FirstName, "John", "%"); // returns John Smith
data.WhereLike(x=>x.FirstName, "J%", "%"); // returns John Smith and Jane Smith
| improve this answer | |
  • I have to say, the article only had code for the IQueryable, and I think it works wonders. I added the IEnumerable code myself (might have taken that from another website, don't remember) and figured I might as well share it with you guys. – Jon Koeter Aug 16 '17 at 9:41

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