I am switching an application from Objective-C to Swift, which I have a couple of categories with stored properties, for example:

@interface UIView (MyCategory)

- (void)alignToView:(UIView *)view
          alignment:(UIViewRelativeAlignment)alignment;
- (UIView *)clone;

@property (strong) PFObject *xo;
@property (nonatomic) BOOL isAnimating;

@end

As Swift extensions don't accept stored properties like these, I don't know how to maintain the same structure as the Objc code. Stored properties are really important for my app and I believe Apple must have created some solution for doing it in Swift.

As said by jou, what I was looking for was actually using associated objects, so I did (in another context):

import Foundation
import QuartzCore
import ObjectiveC

extension CALayer {
    var shapeLayer: CAShapeLayer? {
        get {
            return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, "shapeLayer") as? CAShapeLayer
        }
        set(newValue) {
            objc_setAssociatedObject(self, "shapeLayer", newValue, UInt(OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN))
        }
    }

    var initialPath: CGPathRef! {
        get {
            return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, "initialPath") as CGPathRef
        }
        set {
            objc_setAssociatedObject(self, "initialPath", newValue, UInt(OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN))
        }
    }
}

But I get an EXC_BAD_ACCESS when doing:

class UIBubble : UIView {
    required init(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
        ...
        self.layer.shapeLayer = CAShapeLayer()
        ...
    }
}

Any ideas?

  • 10
    Objective-C class categories can't define instance variables either, so how did you realize those properties? – Martin R Aug 21 '14 at 12:55
  • Not sure why you get a bad access, but your code should not work. You are passing different values to setAssociateObject and getAssociatedObject. Using the string "shapeLayer" as a key is wrong, it's the pointer (it's address actually) that is the key, not what it points to. Two identical strings residing at different addresses are two different keys. Review Jou's answer and notice how he defined xoAssociationKey to be a global variable, so it is the same key/pointer when setting/getting. – Randy Hill Oct 8 '14 at 19:15

16 Answers 16

up vote 42 down vote accepted

Associated objects API is a bit cumbersome to use. You can remove most of the boilerplate with a helper class.

public final class ObjectAssociation<T: AnyObject> {

    private let policy: objc_AssociationPolicy

    /// - Parameter policy: An association policy that will be used when linking objects.
    public init(policy: objc_AssociationPolicy = .OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC) {

        self.policy = policy
    }

    /// Accesses associated object.
    /// - Parameter index: An object whose associated object is to be accessed.
    public subscript(index: AnyObject) -> T? {

        get { return objc_getAssociatedObject(index, Unmanaged.passUnretained(self).toOpaque()) as! T? }
        set { objc_setAssociatedObject(index, Unmanaged.passUnretained(self).toOpaque(), newValue, policy) }
    }
}

Provided that you can "add" a property to objective-c class in a more readable manner:

extension SomeType {

    private static let association = ObjectAssociation<NSObject>()

    var simulatedProperty: NSObject? {

        get { return SomeType.association[self] }
        set { SomeType.association[self] = newValue }
    }
}
  • Ok what to do if I want to store Int, Bool and etc? – Vyachaslav Gerchicov Jun 30 '17 at 13:43
  • 1
    It is not possible to store Swift types via object association directly. You could store e.g. NSNumber or NSValue and write additional pair of accessors that would be of the types you wanted (Int, Bool, etc). – Wojciech Nagrodzki Jul 2 '17 at 21:20
  • WARNING This does not work for structs, because the objective-c runtime library only supports classes that conform to NSObjectProtocol – Charlton Provatas Feb 6 at 19:44
  • 2
    @CharltonProvatas It is not possible to use structs with this API, they do not conform to AnyObject protocol. – Wojciech Nagrodzki Feb 9 at 16:34

As in Objective-C, you can't add stored property to existing classes. If you're extending an Objective-C class (UIView is definitely one), you can still use Associated Objects to emulate stored properties:

for Swift 1

import ObjectiveC

private var xoAssociationKey: UInt8 = 0

extension UIView {
    var xo: PFObject! {
        get {
            return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, &xoAssociationKey) as? PFObject
        }
        set(newValue) {
            objc_setAssociatedObject(self, &xoAssociationKey, newValue, objc_AssociationPolicy(OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN))
        }
    }
}

The association key is a pointer that should be the unique for each association. For that, we create a private global variable and use it's memory address as the key with the & operator. See the Using Swift with Cocoa and Objective-C on more details how pointers are handled in Swift.

UPDATED for Swift 2 and 3

import ObjectiveC

private var xoAssociationKey: UInt8 = 0

extension UIView {
    var xo: PFObject! {
        get {
            return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, &xoAssociationKey) as? PFObject
        }
        set(newValue) {
            objc_setAssociatedObject(self, &xoAssociationKey, newValue, objc_AssociationPolicy.OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN)
        }
    }
}
  • That's exactly what I was looking for, but I still have problems. In my CALayer extension I have a property called shapeLayer:CAShapeLayer! with a getter and setter just like you suggested, but in my UIView subclass whenever try doing self.layer.shapeLayer I get a EXC_BAD_ACCESS error. Any suggestions? Cheers – Marcos Duarte Aug 21 '14 at 14:35
  • 2
    @Yar Didn't know about objc_AssociationPolicy, thanks! I've updated the answer – jou Jan 22 '15 at 20:42
  • 2
    In Swift2 you have to use objc_AssociationPolicy.OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN – Tom Oct 27 '15 at 20:42
  • 1
    @SimplGy please add your edit as an additional answer rather than editing your code into someone else's answer. – JAL Jun 22 '16 at 13:49
  • 1
    @BenLeggiero I just removed it. I think the type is different (Int), but it breaks in Swift 3 edge (xcode beta) anyway so I couldn't do a meaningful test on it. – SimplGy Aug 11 '16 at 17:07

So I think I found a method that works cleaner than the ones above because it doesn't require any global variables. I got it from here: http://nshipster.com/swift-objc-runtime/

The gist is that you use a struct like so:

extension UIViewController {
    private struct AssociatedKeys {
        static var DescriptiveName = "nsh_DescriptiveName"
    }

    var descriptiveName: String? {
        get {
            return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, &AssociatedKeys.DescriptiveName) as? String
        }
        set {
            if let newValue = newValue {
                objc_setAssociatedObject(
                    self,
                    &AssociatedKeys.DescriptiveName,
                    newValue as NSString?,
                    UInt(OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC)
                )
            }
        }
    }
}

UPDATE for Swift 2

private struct AssociatedKeys {
    static var displayed = "displayed"
}

//this lets us check to see if the item is supposed to be displayed or not
var displayed : Bool {
    get {
        guard let number = objc_getAssociatedObject(self, &AssociatedKeys.displayed) as? NSNumber else {
            return true
        }
        return number.boolValue
    }

    set(value) {
        objc_setAssociatedObject(self,&AssociatedKeys.displayed,NSNumber(bool: value),objc_AssociationPolicy.OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC)
    }
}
  • @AKWeblS I have implemented code like yours but when updating to swift 2.0, i am getting the error cannot invoke initializer for type 'UInt' with an argument list of type 'objc_AssociationPolicy)'. Code in next comment – user2363025 Oct 23 '15 at 7:16
  • How to update for swift 2.0? var postDescription: String? { get { return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, &AssociatedKeys.postDescription) as? String } set { if let newValue = newValue { objc_setAssociatedObject( self, &AssociatedKeys.postDescription, newValue as NSString?, UInt(objc_AssociationPolicy.OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC) ) } } } – user2363025 Oct 23 '15 at 7:16
  • I've edited my example above. – AlexK Oct 30 '15 at 18:51
  • doesn't work : static var means that the value of the property is the same for all instance – Fry Mar 8 '17 at 15:40
  • @fry - it continues to work for me. Yes, the key is static, but its associated with a specific object, the object itself is not global. – AlexK Jul 23 '17 at 22:37

The solution pointed out by jou doesn't support value types, this works fine with them as well

Wrappers

import ObjectiveC

final class Lifted<T> {
    let value: T
    init(_ x: T) {
        value = x
    }
}

private func lift<T>(x: T) -> Lifted<T>  {
    return Lifted(x)
}

func setAssociatedObject<T>(object: AnyObject, value: T, associativeKey: UnsafePointer<Void>, policy: objc_AssociationPolicy) {
    if let v: AnyObject = value as? AnyObject {
        objc_setAssociatedObject(object, associativeKey, v,  policy)
    }
    else {
        objc_setAssociatedObject(object, associativeKey, lift(value),  policy)
    }
}

func getAssociatedObject<T>(object: AnyObject, associativeKey: UnsafePointer<Void>) -> T? {
    if let v = objc_getAssociatedObject(object, associativeKey) as? T {
        return v
    }
    else if let v = objc_getAssociatedObject(object, associativeKey) as? Lifted<T> {
        return v.value
    }
    else {
        return nil
    }
}

A possible Class extension (Example of usage):

extension UIView {

    private struct AssociatedKey {
        static var viewExtension = "viewExtension"
    }

    var referenceTransform: CGAffineTransform? {
        get {
            return getAssociatedObject(self, associativeKey: &AssociatedKey.viewExtension)
        }

        set {
            if let value = newValue {
                setAssociatedObject(self, value: value, associativeKey: &AssociatedKey.viewExtension, policy: objc_AssociationPolicy.OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC)
            }
        }
    }
}

This is really such a great solution, I wanted to add another usage example that included structs and values that are not optionals. Also, the AssociatedKey values can be simplified.

struct Crate {
    var name: String
}

class Box {
    var name: String

    init(name: String) {
        self.name = name
    }
}

extension UIViewController {

    private struct AssociatedKey {
        static var displayed:   UInt8 = 0
        static var box:         UInt8 = 0
        static var crate:       UInt8 = 0
    }

    var displayed: Bool? {
        get {
            return getAssociatedObject(self, associativeKey: &AssociatedKey.displayed)
        }

        set {
            if let value = newValue {
                setAssociatedObject(self, value: value, associativeKey: &AssociatedKey.displayed, policy: objc_AssociationPolicy.OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC)
            }
        }
    }

    var box: Box {
        get {
            if let result:Box = getAssociatedObject(self, associativeKey: &AssociatedKey.box) {
                return result
            } else {
                let result = Box(name: "")
                self.box = result
                return result
            }
        }

        set {
            setAssociatedObject(self, value: newValue, associativeKey: &AssociatedKey.box, policy: objc_AssociationPolicy.OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC)
        }
    }

    var crate: Crate {
        get {
            if let result:Crate = getAssociatedObject(self, associativeKey: &AssociatedKey.crate) {
                return result
            } else {
                let result = Crate(name: "")
                self.crate = result
                return result
            }
        }

        set {
            setAssociatedObject(self, value: newValue, associativeKey: &AssociatedKey.crate, policy: objc_AssociationPolicy.OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC)
        }
    }
}
  • And how do I use the Lifted class? – 3lvis Sep 23 '15 at 5:56
  • Why do you need that? What for? – HepaKKes Sep 29 '15 at 16:40
  • I meant how do you use this in general, thanks for your help :) Can you add a "How to use" example, please? – 3lvis Sep 29 '15 at 18:59
  • 1
    The "How to use" example would start right below "A possible Class extension" header. I don't think users need to know how to use the lift method and the Lifted class, they should use however getAssociatedObject & setAssociatedObject functions. I'll add "Example of usage" between parenthesis next to the header for the sake of clarity. – HepaKKes Sep 30 '15 at 11:23
  • 1
    This is certainly the best solution, too bad it is not explained very well. It works with classes, structs, and other value types. The properties do not have to be optionals either. Nice work. – picciano Feb 6 '16 at 23:13

You can't define categories (Swift extensions) with new storage; any additional properties must be computed rather than stored. The syntax works for Objective C because @property in a category essentially means "I'll provide the getter and setter". In Swift, you'll need to define these yourself to get a computed property; something like:

extension String {
    public var Foo : String {
        get
        {
            return "Foo"
        }

        set
        {
            // What do you want to do here?
        }
    }
}

Should work fine. Remember, you can't store new values in the setter, only work with the existing available class state.

My $0.02. This code is written in Swift 2.0

extension CALayer {
    private struct AssociatedKeys {
        static var shapeLayer:CAShapeLayer?
    }

    var shapeLayer: CAShapeLayer? {
        get {
            return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, &AssociatedKeys.shapeLayer) as? CAShapeLayer
        }
        set {
            if let newValue = newValue {
                objc_setAssociatedObject(self, &AssociatedKeys.shapeLayer, newValue as CAShapeLayer?, objc_AssociationPolicy.OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC)
            }
        }
    }
}

I have tried many solutions, and found this is the only way to actually extend a class with extra variable parameters.

  • Looks interesting, but refuses doesn't work with protocols, type 'AssociatedKeys' cannot be defined within a protocol extension – Ian Bytchek Jan 25 '16 at 10:00

I prefer doing code in pure Swift and not rely on Objective-C heritage. Because of this I wrote pure Swift solution with two advantages and two disadvantages.

Advantages:

  1. Pure Swift code

  2. Works on classes and completions or more specifically on Any object

Disadvantages:

  1. Code should call method willDeinit() to release objects linked to specific class instance to avoid memory leaks

  2. You cannot make extension directly to UIView for this exact example because var frame is extension to UIView, not part of class.

EDIT:

import UIKit

var extensionPropertyStorage: [NSObject: [String: Any]] = [:]

var didSetFrame_ = "didSetFrame"

extension UILabel {

    override public var frame: CGRect {

        get {
            return didSetFrame ?? CGRectNull
        }

        set {
            didSetFrame = newValue
        }
    }

    var didSetFrame: CGRect? {

        get {
            return extensionPropertyStorage[self]?[didSetFrame_] as? CGRect
        }

        set {
            var selfDictionary = extensionPropertyStorage[self] ?? [String: Any]()

            selfDictionary[didSetFrame_] = newValue

            extensionPropertyStorage[self] = selfDictionary
        }
    }

    func willDeinit() {
        extensionPropertyStorage[self] = nil
    }
}
  • 3
    This does not work since extensionPropertyStorage is shared among all instances. If you set a value for one instance, you are setting the value for all instances. – picciano Feb 6 '16 at 22:03
  • It war not good because messing up with functions. Now it is better and works as intended. – vedrano Feb 22 '16 at 22:04
  • @picciano extensionPropertyStorage is shared with all instances by design. It is global variable (Dictionary) that first de-references UILabel instance (NSObject) and then its property ([String: Any]). – vedrano Feb 22 '16 at 22:07
  • @picciano I guess this works for class properties ;) – Nicolas Miari Feb 29 '16 at 10:01
  • frame is an instance property. Where does class property come from? – vedrano Feb 29 '16 at 12:39

Why relying on objc runtime? I don't get the point. By using something like the following you will achieve almost the identical behaviour of a stored property, by using only a pure Swift approach:

extension UIViewController {
    private static var _myComputedProperty = [String:Bool]()

    var myComputedProperty:Bool {
        get {
            let tmpAddress = String(format: "%p", unsafeBitCast(self, to: Int.self))
            return UIViewController._myComputedProperty[tmpAddress] ?? false
        }
        set(newValue) {
            let tmpAddress = String(format: "%p", unsafeBitCast(self, to: Int.self))
            UIViewController._myComputedProperty[tmpAddress] = newValue
        }
    }
}
  • Clever! One possible downside with this approach is memory management. After the host object is deallocated, it's property will still exist in the dictionary which could potentially get expensive on memory usage if this is utilized with a lot of objects. – Charlton Provatas Jun 7 at 13:41

With Obj-c Categories you can only add methods, not instance variables.

In you example you have used @property as a shortcut to adding getter and setter method declarations. You still need to implement those methods.

Similarly in Swift you can add use extensions to add instance methods, computed properties etc. but not stored properties.

I also get an EXC_BAD_ACCESS problem.The value in objc_getAssociatedObject() and objc_setAssociatedObject() should be an Object. And the objc_AssociationPolicy should match the Object.

  • 3
    This does not really answer the question. If you have a different question, you can ask it by clicking Ask Question. You can also add a bounty to draw more attention to this question once you have enough reputation. - From Review – AtheistP3ace Feb 15 '16 at 13:28
  • @AtheistP3ace I am so sorry about that. I try to add a comment to the question.But I do not have enough reputation. So I try to answer the question. – RuiKQ Feb 16 '16 at 1:40

I tried using objc_setAssociatedObject as mentioned in a few of the answers here, but after failing with it a few times I stepped back and realized there is no reason I need that. Borrowing from a few of the ideas here, I came up with this code which simply stores an array of whatever my extra data is (MyClass in this example) indexed by the object I want to associate it with:

class MyClass {
    var a = 1
    init(a: Int)
    {
        self.a = a
    }
}

extension UIView
{
    static var extraData = [UIView: MyClass]()

    var myClassData: MyClass? {
        get {
            return UIView.extraData[self]
        }
        set(value) {
            UIView.extraData[self] = value
        }
    }
}

// Test Code: (Ran in a Swift Playground)
var view1 = UIView()
var view2 = UIView()

view1.myClassData = MyClass(a: 1)
view2.myClassData = MyClass(a: 2)
print(view1.myClassData?.a)
print(view2.myClassData?.a)
  • do you have any idea how to automatically clear extraData so it doesn't cause memory leaks? – DoubleK Sep 30 '16 at 15:52
  • I wasn't actually using this with views, in my case I only ever instantiate a finite number of objects in the class I was using, so I haven't really considered memory leaks. I can't think of an automatic way to do this, but I suppose in the setter above you could add logic to remove the element if value == nil, and then set the value to nil when you no longer need the object, or maybe in didReceiveMemoryWarning or something. – Dan Oct 2 '16 at 21:59
  • Tnx @Dan, I used viewWillDisapper to set value to nil and it works fine, now deinit is called and everything works fine. Tnx for posting this solution – DoubleK Oct 2 '16 at 22:09

Here is simplified and more expressive solution. It works for both value and reference types. The approach of lifting is taken from @HepaKKes answer.

Association code:

import ObjectiveC

final class Lifted<T> {
    let value: T
    init(_ x: T) {
        value = x
    }
}

private func lift<T>(_ x: T) -> Lifted<T>  {
    return Lifted(x)
}

func associated<T>(to base: AnyObject,
                key: UnsafePointer<UInt8>,
                policy: objc_AssociationPolicy = .OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN,
                initialiser: () -> T) -> T {
    if let v = objc_getAssociatedObject(base, key) as? T {
        return v
    }

    if let v = objc_getAssociatedObject(base, key) as? Lifted<T> {
        return v.value
    }

    let lifted = Lifted(initialiser())
    objc_setAssociatedObject(base, key, lifted, policy)
    return lifted.value
}

func associate<T>(to base: AnyObject, key: UnsafePointer<UInt8>, value: T, policy: objc_AssociationPolicy = .OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN) {
    if let v: AnyObject = value as AnyObject? {
        objc_setAssociatedObject(base, key, v, policy)
    }
    else {
        objc_setAssociatedObject(base, key, lift(value), policy)
    }
}

Example of usage:

1) Create extension and associate properties to it. Let's use both value and reference type properties.

extension UIButton {

    struct Keys {
        static fileprivate var color: UInt8 = 0
        static fileprivate var index: UInt8 = 0
    }

    var color: UIColor {
        get {
            return associated(to: self, key: &Keys.color) { .green }
        }
        set {
            associate(to: self, key: &Keys.color, value: newValue)
        }
    }

    var index: Int {
        get {
            return associated(to: self, key: &Keys.index) { -1 }
        }
        set {
            associate(to: self, key: &Keys.index, value: newValue)
        }
    }

}

2) Now you can use just as regular properties:

    let button = UIButton()
    print(button.color) // UIExtendedSRGBColorSpace 0 1 0 1 == green
    button.color = .black
    print(button.color) // UIExtendedGrayColorSpace 0 1 == black

    print(button.index) // -1
    button.index = 3
    print(button.index) // 3

More details:

  1. Lifting is needed for wrapping value types.
  2. Default associated object behavior is retain. If you want to learn more about associated objects, I'd recommend checking this article.

Another example with using Objective-C associated objects and computed properties for Swift 3 and Swift 4

import CoreLocation

extension CLLocation {

    private struct AssociatedKeys {
        static var originAddress = "originAddress"
        static var destinationAddress = "destinationAddress"
    }

    var originAddress: String? {
        get {
            return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, &AssociatedKeys.originAddress) as? String
        }
        set {
            if let newValue = newValue {
                objc_setAssociatedObject(
                    self,
                    &AssociatedKeys.originAddress,
                    newValue as NSString?,
                    .OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC
                )
            }
        }
    }

    var destinationAddress: String? {
        get {
            return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, &AssociatedKeys.destinationAddress) as? String
        }
        set {
            if let newValue = newValue {
                objc_setAssociatedObject(
                    self,
                    &AssociatedKeys.destinationAddress,
                    newValue as NSString?,
                    .OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC
                )
            }
        }
    }

}

I tried to store properties by using objc_getAssociatedObject, objc_setAssociatedObject, without any luck. My goal was create extension for UITextField, to validate text input characters length. Following code works fine for me. Hope this will help someone.

private var _min: Int?
private var _max: Int?

extension UITextField {    
    @IBInspectable var minLength: Int {
        get {
            return _min ?? 0
        }
        set {
            _min = newValue
        }
    }

    @IBInspectable var maxLength: Int {
        get {
            return _max ?? 1000
        }
        set {
            _max = newValue
        }
    }

    func validation() -> (valid: Bool, error: String) {
        var valid: Bool = true
        var error: String = ""
        guard let text = self.text else { return (true, "") }

        if text.characters.count < minLength {
            valid = false
            error = "Textfield should contain at least \(minLength) characters"
        }

        if text.characters.count > maxLength {
            valid = false
            error = "Textfield should not contain more then \(maxLength) characters"
        }

        if (text.characters.count < minLength) && (text.characters.count > maxLength) {
            valid = false
            error = "Textfield should contain at least \(minLength) characters\n"
            error = "Textfield should not contain more then \(maxLength) characters"
        }

        return (valid, error)
    }
}
  • Global private variables? Do you realize that _min and _max are global and will be the same in all instances of the UITextField? Even if it works for you, this answer is unrelated because Marcos asking about instance variables. – kelin Dec 2 '16 at 10:35
  • Yes you right, this not working for all the instances. I Fixed by storing min and max value in struct. Sorry for off topic. – Vadims Krutovs Dec 3 '16 at 8:47

Here is an alternative that works also

public final class Storage : AnyObject {

    var object:Any?

    public init(_ object:Any) {
        self.object = object
    }
}

extension Date {

    private static let associationMap = NSMapTable<NSString, AnyObject>()
    private struct Keys {
        static var Locale:NSString = "locale"
    }

    public var locale:Locale? {
        get {

            if let storage = Date.associationMap.object(forKey: Keys.Locale) {
                return (storage as! Storage).object as? Locale
            }
            return nil
        }
        set {
            if newValue != nil {
                Date.associationMap.setObject(Storage(newValue), forKey: Keys.Locale)
            }
        }
    }
}



var date = Date()
date.locale = Locale(identifier: "pt_BR")
print( date.locale )

I found this solution more practical

UPDATED for Swift 3

extension UIColor {

    static let graySpace = UIColor.init(red: 50/255, green: 50/255, blue: 50/255, alpha: 1.0)
    static let redBlood = UIColor.init(red: 102/255, green: 0/255, blue: 0/255, alpha: 1.0)
    static let redOrange = UIColor.init(red: 204/255, green: 17/255, blue: 0/255, alpha: 1.0)

    func alpha(value : CGFloat) -> UIColor {
        var r = CGFloat(0), g = CGFloat(0), b = CGFloat(0), a = CGFloat(0)
        self.getRed(&r, green: &g, blue: &b, alpha: &a)
        return UIColor(red: r, green: g, blue: b, alpha: value)
    }

}

...then in your code

class gameController: UIViewController {

    @IBOutlet var game: gameClass!

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        self.view.backgroundColor = UIColor.graySpace

    }
}
  • This is the right way to do it - but not really a stored property in the extension like the question asks. – Mobile Bloke Feb 17 '17 at 10:53

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