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I'm looking at switching my line-height set up from rem based to unitless.

I'm trying to understand why I should do this what the benefits are compered to staying with rems, such as, is there a performance/rendering benefit, or does unitless help with responsive?

The main benefit for me at the moment is reduction in required px fallback declarations. I am using rem values with px fallbacks as the support between rem and em units is about on par.

Also resetting the em value back to 1 for nested elements, is a headache. I feel it's just as much work as declaring aemreset for nested elements as it is for a px fallback.

Additionally older versions of ie, ignore the rem property/value and fallback to the px property/value.

This is how I was declaring my font-size and line-height for text elements.

body {
    font-size: 16px;
    font-size: 1.6rem; /* 16px */
    line-height: 25px;
    line-height: 2.5rem; /* 25px */
}

Currently, my body font-size and line-height are:

html {
   font-size: 62.5%; /* reset font-size to 10px */
}

body {
    font-size: 1.6rem; /* 16px */
    line-height: 2.5rem; /* 25px */
}

What benefit is there is switching to this?

html {
   font-size: 62.5%; /* reset fon- size to 10px */
}

body {
    font-size: 1.6rem; /* 16px */
    line-height: 1.66667; /* 2.5rem / 25px*/
}

If I have a h1 set like this

h1 {
    font-size: 3.0rem; /* 30px */
    line-height: 3.6rem; /* 36px */
}

I still need to declare a line-height other wise the inherited value becomes a bit crazy

h1 { 
    font-size: 3.0rem; /* 30px */
   /* line-height: 50px; (inherited from body line-height (1.66667)  */
}

So I declare a line-height that is acceptable

h1 {
    font-size: 3.0rem; /* 30px */
    line-height: 1.2; /* 3.6rem / 36px */
}

Great! but if I still need to declare a line-height, what is the benefit of switching to unitless?

Also, when I'm using line-height to vertically align some text in an container, should I use unitless, stick with rem as it's a specific height.

.my-container { 
    display: block;
    font-size: 1.6rem;
    line-height: 4.0rem;
}

I'm assuming that the rule of thumb is to assign unitless height just to text objects like p, h1, h2 etc.

Here is a codepen demonstrating the unitless implementation http://codepen.io/onebitrocket/pen/qLzlc

Any thoughts would be appreciated

Thanks

  • You seem to be expecting that the basic font size is alwatys 16px. It is unclear what you expect to gain then by using percentages or rem units, instead of simply setting everything in pixels. Thus, it is impossible to compare the pros and cons, since we don’t know your criteria. – Jukka K. Korpela Aug 21 '14 at 16:20
1

Since you're worried about what I can only assume to be line-height it is allowed to do a unit-less line-height period. Essentially the calculated height will base off of the calculated font-size.

div{
   font-size: 1.6rem;
   line-height: 4; // should be the exact same as 4.0rem;
}

Personally I do not like to use rems as you are seeing they really need many fall backs and known calculation. Not all developers use a standard for rems since it hasn't been accepted as the standard. If it did then maybe it would be better to use as it can help for responsiveness, but with media queries you shouldn't have to worry about how responsive your site is.

I am someone who pushes for px. Just a preferred method that works very well. EMs and REMs give me a headache as they do not work perfectly in every case. I can predict pixels without worrying about someone changing one value and breaking everything else.

Just a thought.

|improve this answer|||||
  • I disagree. I find rems removes the headache of ems calculations, having to reset the ems value of each child can be such a pain, and add just as much bloat, and maybe more to the css. Additionally, the support is pretty much comparable. quirksmode.org/css/units-values/mobile.html For mobile, and on desktop only early ie versions don't support rem, and they just omit the declaration and use the fallback. stackoverflow.com/q/21854416/1376820 – Matt Aug 21 '14 at 20:38
  • I agree they remove the headache of the em, but I do not feel they are that much more helpful. As I said it is just a personal preference of use and seeing how complicated a site can become when using these forms of measurement. Then having the client tell you that it is not working in a specific browser because one reads ems/rems in a different manner. – Cayce K Aug 22 '14 at 12:09

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