4

I have a sequence of async tasks to do (say, fetch N web pages). Now what I want is to expose them all as an IObservable<T>. My current solution uses the answer from this question:

async Task<ResultObj> GetPage(string page) {
    Console.WriteLine("Before");
    var result = await FetchFromInternet(page);
    Console.WriteLine("After");
    return result;
}

// pages is an IEnumerable<string>
IObservable<ResultObj> resultObservable =pages.Select(GetPage).
                 Select(t => Observable.FromAsync(() => t)).Merge();

// Now consume the list
foreach(ResultObj obj in resultObservable.ToEnumerable()) {
    Console.WriteLine(obj.ToString());
}

The problem is that I do not know the number of pages to be fetched, and it could be large. I do not want to make hundreds of simultaneous requests. So I want a way to limit the maximum number of tasks that will be executed in parallel. Is there a way to limit the number of concurrent invocations of GetPage?

There is a Merge overload that takes a maxConcurrent parameter, but it does not seem to actually limit the concurrency of the function invokation. THe console prints all the Before messages before the After messages.

Note: I need to convert back to IEnumerable<T>. I'm writing a data source for a system that gives me descriptors of data to fetch, and I need to give it back a list of the downloaded data.

  • You realize that you're firing off your tasks well before you even create the observables right? Your .Select(GetPage) call would be setting off your tasks prematurely. – Jeff Mercado Aug 22 '14 at 1:31
  • @JeffMercado No, linq uses delayed execution, so Select(GetPage) does not fire any tasks. – felipe Aug 22 '14 at 15:46
  • It does. Select(GetPage) gets executed when it is enumerated over. By calling Merge() at the end, you are enumerating over the collection of observables Select(t => Observable.FromAsync(() => t)) which was created by the tasks created by the Select(GetPage) projection. You have effectively fired off the tasks before creating the observables. Without the merge call, then yes, it wouldn't have but since you did... – Jeff Mercado Aug 22 '14 at 15:55
  • @JeffMercado so the culprit is Merge, then, not Select :). So the problem solved by the accepted answer is that Merge will eagerly iterate over the source sequence? The XML documentation does not suggest so. – felipe Aug 22 '14 at 16:12
  • Well, not necessarily the Merge, but the two selects. Merge is expecting an enumerable of observables that will be observing a task to pull them all in to create a single observable. However each of those observables were created from already existing (and running) tasks created by the first select. – Jeff Mercado Aug 22 '14 at 17:06
7

EDIT

The following should work. This overload limits the number of concurrent subscriptions.

var resultObservable = pages
  .Select(p => Observable.FromAsync(() => GetPage(p)))
  .Merge(maxConcurrent);

Explanation

In order to understand why this change is needed we need some background

  1. FromAsync returns an observable that will invoke the passed Func every time it is subscribed to. This implies that if the observable is never subscribed to, it will never be invoked.

  2. Merge eagerly reads the source sequence, and only subscribes to n observables simultaneously.

With these two pieces we can know why the original version will execute everything in parallel: because of (2), GetPage will have already been invoked for all the source strings by the time Merge decides how many observables need to be subscribed.

And we can also see why the second version works: even though the sequence has been fully iterated over, (1) means that GetPage is not invoked until Merge decides it needs to subscribe to n observables. This leads to the desired result of only n tasks being executed simultaneously.

  • I edited the question. I tried that version but it seems like it doesn't work: all the tasks are triggered concurrently. – felipe Aug 22 '14 at 1:16
  • @felipe fixed it now. – Matthew Finlay Aug 22 '14 at 1:30
  • I see, this works. Can you come up with an explanation as to why? I think I understand why I need to invoke the GetPage method inside Observable.FromAsync, but I'm not sure. – felipe Aug 22 '14 at 15:48
  • I feel guilty taking points for this when your explanation is most of the work :) – Matthew Finlay Aug 22 '14 at 23:13
  • Actually, @JeffMercado helped me see in the right direction too – felipe Aug 23 '14 at 14:39

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