1081

I know that PHP doesn't have native Enumerations. But I have become accustomed to them from the Java world. I would love to use enums as a way to give predefined values which IDEs' auto completion features could understand.

Constants do the trick, but there's the namespace collision problem and (or actually because) they're global. Arrays don't have the namespace problem, but they're too vague, they can be overwritten at runtime and IDEs rarely (never?) know how to autofill their keys.

Are there any solutions/workarounds you commonly use? Does anyone recall whether the PHP guys have had any thoughts or decisions around enums?

37 Answers 37

1

Finally, A PHP 7.1+ answer with constants that cannot be overridden.

/**
 * An interface that groups HTTP Accept: header Media Types in one place.
 */
interface MediaTypes
{
    /**
    * Now, if you have to use these same constants with another class, you can
    * without creating funky inheritance / is-a relationships.
    * Also, this gets around the single inheritance limitation.
    */

    public const HTML = 'text/html';
    public const JSON = 'application/json';
    public const XML = 'application/xml';
    public const TEXT = 'text/plain';
}

/**
 * An generic request class.
 */
abstract class Request
{
    // Why not put the constants here?
    // 1) The logical reuse issue.
    // 2) Single Inheritance. 
    // 3) Overriding is possible.

    // Why put class constants here?
    // 1) The constant value will not be necessary in other class families.
}

/**
 * An incoming / server-side HTTP request class.
 */
class HttpRequest extends Request implements MediaTypes
{
    // This class can implement groups of constants as necessary.
}

If you are using namespaces, code completion should work.

However, in doing this, you loose the ability to hide the constants within the class family (protected) or class alone (private). By definition, everything in an Interface is public.

PHP Manual: Interfaces

  • This is not Java. This works in cases where polymorphism / Strategy pattern is not required to override constants in a parent class. – Anthony Rutledge Sep 11 '18 at 4:36
0

My attempt to create an enum with PHP...it's extremely limited since it doesn't support objects as the enum values but still somewhat useful...

class ProtocolsEnum {

    const HTTP = '1';
    const HTTPS = '2';
    const FTP = '3';

    /**
     * Retrieve an enum value
     * @param string $name
     * @return string
     */
    public static function getValueByName($name) {
        return constant('self::'. $name);
    } 

    /**
     * Retrieve an enum key name
     * @param string $code
     * @return string
     */
    public static function getNameByValue($code) {
        foreach(get_class_constants() as $key => $val) {
            if($val == $code) {
                return $key;
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Retrieve associate array of all constants (used for creating droplist options)
     * @return multitype:
     */
    public static function toArray() {      
        return array_flip(self::get_class_constants());
    }

    private static function get_class_constants()
    {
        $reflect = new ReflectionClass(__CLASS__);
        return $reflect->getConstants();
    }
}
  • it's limited in many directions and the existing answers offer far more over it. I'd say this is not really adding anything useful. – hakre Oct 4 '12 at 13:34
0
// My Enumeration Class
class Enum
{
    protected $m_actions = array();

    public function __construct($actions)
    {
        $this->init($actions);
    }

    public function init($actions)
    {
        $this->m_actions = array();
        for($i = 0; $i < count($actions); ++$i)
        {
            $this->m_actions[$actions[$i]] = ($i + 1); 
            define($actions[$i], ($i + 1));
        }
    }

    public function toString($index)
    {
        $keys = array_keys($this->m_actions);
        for($i = 0; $i < count($keys); ++$i)
        {
            if($this->m_actions[$keys[$i]] == $index)
            {
                return $keys[$i];
            }
        }

        return "undefined";
    }

    public function fromString($str)
    {
        return $this->m_actions[$str];
    }
}

// Enumeration creation
$actions = new Enum(array("CREATE", "READ", "UPDATE", "DELETE"));

// Examples
print($action_objects->toString(DELETE));
print($action_objects->fromString("DELETE"));

if($action_objects->fromString($_POST["myAction"]) == CREATE)
{
    print("CREATE");
}
0

I have recently developed a simple library for PHP Enums: https://github.com/dnl-blkv/simple-php-enum

At the moment of writing this answer, it is still in pre-release stage, but already fully-functional, well-documented and published on Packagist.

This might be a handy option if you are looking for easy-to-implement enums similar to those of C/C++.

0

A simpler and lighter version that doesn't use reflection:

abstract class enum {
    private function __construct() {}
    static function has($const) {
        $name = get_called_class();
        return defined("$name::$const");
    }
    static function value($const) {
        $name = get_called_class();
        return defined("$name::$const")? constant("$name::$const") : false;
    }
}

Usage:

class requestFormat  extends enum { const HTML = 1; const JSON = 2; const XML  = 3; const FORM = 4; }

echo requestFormat::value('JSON'); // 2
echo requestFormat::has('JSON');   // true

This gives the advantage of constants and also allows for checking the validity of them but it lacks other fancy functionality provided by more complex solutions given is this question, the more obvious the inability of checking the reverse of a value (in the example above, you can't check if '2' is a valid value)

0

If you want type safety and a bunch of constants that match that type, one way to go is to have an abstract class for your enum and then extend that class with a locked constructor, like so:

abstract class DaysOfWeekEnum{
    public function __construct(string $value){
        $this->value = $value; 
    }
    public function __toString(){
        return $this->value;
    }

}
class Monday extends DaysOfWeekEnum{
    public function __construct(){
        parent::__construct("Monday");
    }
}

class Tuesday extends DaysOfWeekEnum{
    public function __construct(){
        parent::__construct("Tuesday");
    }
}

Then you can have your methods take an instance of DaysOfWeek and pass it an instance of Monday, Tuesday, etc... The only downside is having to 'new-up' an instance every time you want to use your enum, but I find it worth it.

function printWeekDay(DaysOfWeek $day){
    echo "Today is $day.";
}

printWeekDay(new Monday());
-3

I use a construction like the following for simple enums. Typically you can use them for switch statements.

<?php 
  define("OPTION_1", "1");
  define("OPTION_2", OPTION_1 + 1);
  define("OPTION_3", OPTION_2 + 1);

  // Some function...
   switch($Val){
    case OPTION_1:{ Perform_1();}break;
    case OPTION_2:{ Perform_2();}break;
    ...
  }
?>

It is not as conviniet as a native enum like in C++ but it seems to work and requires less maintenance if you later would like to add an option in between.

  • 2
    You are missing the point entirely. Java Enumerations are part of their OOP. The question was whether there is an alternativ in PHP besides constants, and your solution does neither use OOP, nor avoid constants. – Sven Oct 19 '12 at 22:19

protected by NullPoiиteя Aug 23 '13 at 4:12

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